Help identifying Smith and Wesson revolver

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Zachary Keith, May 23, 2018.

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  1. Zachary Keith

    Zachary Keith Member

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    Can anyone help me in identifying my Smith and Wesson revolver?
    upload_2018-5-23_7-26-14.jpeg
    upload_2018-5-23_7-27-58.jpeg
     
  2. NIGHTLORD40K

    NIGHTLORD40K Member

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    S&W Fourth Model, made 1898-1902
     
  3. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    That is a little bit vague.

    It is either a 32 Double Action, or a 38 Double Action, depending on the caliber. I cannot quite tell from your photo.

    I also cannot make out the Serial Number.

    This is a 38 Double Action 4th Model:

    38%20Double%20Action%204th%20Model%2001_zpsukpbkle7.jpg
     
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  4. reddog81

    reddog81 Member

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    I'm not sure the caliber matters a whole lot in this scenario. Id'd be hesitant to shoot it either way. Value will be around $25-$50 depending on the condition of the internals.
     
  5. KYregular

    KYregular Member

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    Cant remember the model, but had one once. Believe its a 32, black powder rounds only.
     
  6. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Looks like a .38 Double Action, if it were a .32 the cylinder would be shorter in proportion, its front face behind the front of the trigger guard.
    I don't know what happened to the OP's revolver, the sideplate screw is just gone and the pins appear peened over and flattened. Not a shooter. Not valuable.
     
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  7. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    The caliber matters because the 32 Double Action and the 38 Double Action are two different models.

    Jim Watson is correct, it is a 38 Double Action, similar to the one I posted, with the front face of the cylinder in front of the trigger guard.

    Thanks, Jim, always something new to learn about Smith and Wessons.

    Seeing as the front sight is forged onto the barrel, rather than pinned on like mine, it is a 5th Model. Serial Numbers ran from 539001 through 554077, 15,000 manufactured between 1909 and 1911.
     
  8. Riomouse911

    Riomouse911 Member

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    In the bottom drawer of the old gun cabinet my Grandfather had a rough 4th model .38 S&W that was nickel plated that I remember as a kid in the 1970's. The story was that he found it on the side of a dirt road back in the hill country of Texas many, MANY decades ago. He said it had four live rounds and one fired cartridge case in it when he found it, and I don't think it was ever fired again because when I cracked it open it still had 4 live R-P LRN rounds and a singe fired cartridge case in the cylinder (All were nickel plated cases, if I recall correctly).

    I'll assume it was probably used in some sort of crime and tossed out of a car during the getaway, but I have no idea what happened to it (He died in August of 1990, the gun was probably given away after that).
     
  9. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Howdy Again

    If we are going to be telling stories about old S&W 38 Double Actions, this one was on display in a museum next to one of the lakes in Central Park in New York City. It had apparently been found when the lake was being dredged at some point. I always assumed it had been thrown into the lake after a crime.

    The last time I visited that museum, the pistol was no longer on display. Probably not Politically Correct.

    Central%20Park%20Smith_zpsfwmuo8rn.jpg
     
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