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Help in ID of Rifle Stock "Style" ! Pic!

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by tractorshaft, Dec 23, 2008.

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  1. tractorshaft

    tractorshaft member

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    Hi,

    Can anyone identify this "Style" of gunstock for me? Is it referred to as a "Slim Line" stock? Any help or suggestions greatly appreciated!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    I refer to it as a "British sporting rifle stock" since the slim lines and short foreend are characteristic of English bolt action rifles of the old safari days. This might be a new gun in the style of 60 years ago; I'd like to see the other side to identify the safety.

    By the way, the picture is flipped unless you have a Wells custom lefthanded Mauser.
     
  3. tractorshaft

    tractorshaft member

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    Jim,

    Thanks for the reply! I would bet you are 100% correct on this sir, that is predominately where I have seen them. It looks like a cut-off "Classic" style stock with an ebony tip (sharply curved) capping it off. Was there a "Functional" reason for shortening the stock like this? I like it and am going to build one very similar to this only using a CZ 527 action in 7.62 X 39 or 6.5MM Grendel for a "Walking Rifle". Nice stick of wood on this piece.


    Here is the link to the entire series of pictures, the gun shown here is a "Mini-Mauser" action in .223 of recent manufacture by Martini and Hagn Gun Makers, they sure do nice work. I got a quote for a little gem like this; $8000.00 CAN, 18 month delivery.


    http://martiniandhagngunmakers.com/projects.htm

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    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
  4. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    I figure the function of the short foreend was that those safari rifles were meant to be shot almost exclusively offhand and a longer stock to lay over a rest or even to space a front shooting sling swivel properly was not a consideration. The ones I have seen had less pointy ebony or horn tips, though.

    Either M&H flipped their pictures or they really did build a lefthanded bolt action. A .223 in the style of a buffalo rifle seems a little, well, precious, wouldn't you say?

    Wonder why they built the matching 7mm R.M. on an Argie military action? Got them commercial grade machine work and a sporting type floorplate release, but I have read those 1909s might be a little soft. No reason they could not have retempered it at those prices, of course.
     
  5. tractorshaft

    tractorshaft member

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  6. tractorshaft

    tractorshaft member

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    Jim Says; A .223 in the style of a buffalo rifle seems a little, well, precious, wouldn't you say? Ha Ha

    Yeah, you got that right. But for me the style and functionality of it just plain works. I like the AK round, especially in a bolt action with iron sights for short range hog and deer hunting. I know, its awful pretty, maybe it will be my new "BBQ Rifle" Ha Ha. Thanks for the note and comments, lots of great history in this "Style" for sure...
     
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