Quantcast

HELP! What is this Colt Revolver I Have?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by skidooman603, Feb 15, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. skidooman603

    skidooman603 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    ColtDA41001.gif

    I inherited this Colt. It is marked DA 41 and as you can see is in cherry shape. I am a rifle guy and certainly not a Colt expert. The bore shines like the sun and has minimal handling marks. I know it's gotta have age. The serial # is 210...Yes 210. All of the parts are marked 210.. What have I got here? Thanks experts.
     
  2. o Unforgiven o

    o Unforgiven o Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2010
    Messages:
    598
    Location:
    Central FL
    It looks like a Colt 1889 Navy that been nickle plated. The 41 is for .41 LC.
     
  3. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,346
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    1889 that is missing the lanyard loop and chromed.
     
  4. JellyJar

    JellyJar Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2009
    Messages:
    1,295
    Location:
    Alabama
    Guillermo. I don't see a hole in the bottom where I think the lanyard loop thing would be screwed in. So are you sure of that?
     
  5. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Messages:
    59,076
    Location:
    Eastern KS
  6. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    25,462
    Surely a commercial model, the Navy did not issue .41s.
    The hard rubber grips are right for a commercial model, too.
    The 1889 was available in factory nickel plate. It is worth expert examination to tell if yours is factory.

    Is the number 210 on the bottom of the butt? Colt used assembly numbers not connected to the serial number in other locations.
     
  7. skidooman603

    skidooman603 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    I did have a Colt expert in my town look at it late this PM. He showed me where the serial number was on the butt. Thought holy crap 210 serial..Ha Ha I guess a guy can wish. Also he said it is factory nickle finish. I am glad it wasn't chromed after market..Thanks Guys
     
  8. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    6,256
    Assuming your New Navy Model 1889 is original nickel and in the nice shape it appears, value could be as high as $2000.
    Nickel is rare, and one in that high of condition would be a collectors find.
    It appears to have the original heat blued trigger as original.

    Treat it gently. These old guns have very delicate, intricate actions that break and get out of order easily.
    There are almost no parts available and almost no gunsmith will touch one.

    Colt invented the double action swing-out cylinder revolver in 1889 as the Colt New Navy Model of 1889.
    In 1892 the Army bought it too, and the name was changed to the Colt New Army and Navy.
    Colt put the design through a rapid series of improvements and each improvement got a new model number. These were the Models 1889, 1892, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1901, and 1903.
    Production ended in 1907.
    These were made as both military issue and commercial sales guns.
    Original calibers were the .38 Long Colt and the .41 Long Colt.
    It was the military issue model chambered in .38 Long Colt that failed in the Philippines and led to the adoption of the Colt 1911 .45 Automatic.

    These are considered to be display guns today due to the availability of ammunition, and the chances of damaging the action.
    They are a historic gun being the first modern revolver with a swing-out cylinder.
    If all original, a collector would be very interested.
     
  9. skidooman603

    skidooman603 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    Wow..That is a wealth of info. Thank You so much. All I've done to it since it came into my possession is wipe it down with a jewelers cloth and run some kroils through the barrel. I will have to find an expert of a bit higher degree to confirm what I may have here. I surely don't want to do any damage to it..or even shoot it now for that matter. Wonder whom I could send detailed photos to for confirmation?
     
  10. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,346
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    Jim, Dfaris and RC are certainly members of the THR braintrust.

    Nothing like a great old gun to bring them out.

    :)
     
  11. skidooman603

    skidooman603 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    I can't thank you gents enough for the help. RC has helped me out times uncountable....:) As I mentioned earlier, rifles are my love but I think this revolver may get a special place in my safe. The relation that left it to me was not a close relation but knew I have a love of old firearms. Probably figured I would figure out what I had. Wish the old boy was around to tell me how he came about owning it...
     
  12. Jim K

    Jim K Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    17,848
    I hate to say this, but there is something wrong there. Colt started production of the Model 1889 on a Navy contract for 5000 guns, and no civilian models were shipped until that contract was completed, so the lowest civilian serial is 5001. The 210 in various places is certainly the assembly number and should not appear on the butt; if it does, the original butt serial was removed and the assembly number put on.

    The gun is certainly a Model 1889 since it has the locking notches in the back of the cylinder while the Model 1892 and subsequent models in the series had them on the side.

    In addition, it is my belief that the gun has been refinished and that it was probably not plated originally, although nickel, silver and gold plating were available.

    The butt length, combined with the .41 caliber, indicates the gun is a civilian model, not a worked over Navy contract gun.

    Jim
     
  13. Kernel

    Kernel Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2003
    Messages:
    2,004
    Location:
    77 Square Miles Surrounded by Reality (Madison), W
    Ain't never noticed one done like that before. Different.
     
  14. skidooman603

    skidooman603 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    No the serial # on the butt is not 210...It is a 5 dig #. Not sure what, as it is at my place of business. I am going to post some more detailed photos when I get to work.
     
  15. skidooman603

    skidooman603 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    ColtDA41015.gif
    Had to go get it.

    This is what the butt looks like. Is this a 5 dig or is it just the 914 #? This pistol is driving me nuts...
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012
  16. skidooman603

    skidooman603 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    ColtDA41009.gif

    Some more internals


    ColtDA41013.gif
    bbl

    ColtDA41016.gif

    ColtDA41021.gif

    Pic from reverse side of pistol

    ColtDA41007.gif
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012
  17. skidooman603

    skidooman603 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    pix757446365.gif

    Saw this one in a .38 on GB. Looks very much the same...
     
  18. skidooman603

    skidooman603 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    Any additional opinions with the added photos? Thanks Guys
     
  19. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,346
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    Jim K knows his stuff and as usually, nailed it
     
  20. skidooman603

    skidooman603 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    Well Damn...I don't have refinished historical pieces in my safe..Don't figure I will start now :(
     
  21. Iggy

    Iggy Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    3,378
    Location:
    Wyoming
    Definitely refinished. Is that the remnants of a serial number on the butt?
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012
  22. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    17,769
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    I agree it's a refinish but it looks like they did do a very good job. Not the overpolished mess that most old refinished Colt's are. Color looks more like nickel than chrome.
     
  23. evan price

    evan price Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,485
    Location:
    http://www.ohioccw.org/ Ohio's best CCW resour
    You can tell that they broke all the sharp angles when they polished it, so it's a refinish, I agree. Looks to mel ike they polished the frame and the sideplate while they were not installed together hence the ripples around the seams of the sideplate.
    41 Colt ammo is hen's teeth. It can be loaded, iirc Starline makes the brass. However these had a reputation for being finicky inside and nearly impossible to fix nowadays since there's no Colt gunsmiths to speak of.
     
  24. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    6,256
    These models had the serial stamped on the butt in two lines.
    I can't make out the top two numbers, but here's a site where you can determine the year made:

    http://proofhouse.com/colt/
    Look under the 1889 Navy model
     
  25. Jim K

    Jim K Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    17,848
    As dfariswheel says, the serial number is two lines; that one looks like 23924, which would be 1893 production.

    I noticed an error in my original post. I said the Model 1889 has the locking notches on the back of the cylinder. My booboo! It has the same kind of hand setup as the Model 1878 and really doesn't have locking notches at all; the hand both turns and locks the cylinder.

    (A sidelight of that regarding the Model 1878 is that when the 1878 was discontinued, Colt had left over cylinders. Since "Colt never threw anything away" (old collector saying), they cut notches in them and used them in the SAA. Those are the so-called "long flute" SAA cylinders.)

    Jim
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice