Help with 1924 Mauser - Made for the Mexican Army.

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Charly2020!, Nov 12, 2020.

  1. Charly2020!

    Charly2020! Member

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    Howdy!

    I am being offered this 1924 Mexican FN Herstal (Belgium-made) Mauser. However, I need help identifying the precise model and caliber (I suspect it is a 7x57 Mauser). Can I please request your help identifying these variables? Also, how much do you expect this Mauser be worth?

    P.S. I noticed that the cleaning rod is no longer with the rifle. Is this a major issue for someone collecting it? Is this part easily replaceable?

    Thank you for your help and I hope you enjoy the picture.
     

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  2. indy1919a4

    indy1919a4 Member

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    My suspicion it is 7mm, but there is a bunch converted to different calibers.. So it will need to be checked to make sure.

    Missing clean rods can be purchased pretty cheap..

    I have seen them sell for 500 - 600.. I see some setting at 600-700 unsold on gunbroker right now.

    I do like the identification disk on the stock, is it marked..??? Those rack number disks are a nice touch.
     
  3. Dave DeLaurant

    Dave DeLaurant Member

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    Like indy says.

    Mexican actions were popular for sporting conversions, though since this one is still in original military trim it is likely unaltered. Speaking only for myself, I would feel reasonably confident that it's in the original 7x57 if you confirm the bore diameter at the muzzle with a 7mm bullet -- it doesn't appear sporterized, and if a 7mm bullet doesn't drop down the barrel, you'll at least know it hasn't been arsenal converted to 30-06 like some Mexican military rifles (most commonly the Model 1936s). You can also check the magazine box for conversion indications, but of course a chamber cast is definitive.

    By the way, if I had a shot at it and the scratch, I'd buy it in a heartbeat regardless and confirm chambering after I got it home, particularly if the bore looks as good as the exterior. Mexican service Mausers in original configuration are pretty scarce and very good quality rifles.

    Here's what Robert Ball has to say in the 5th edition of Mauser Rifles of the World:

    MexFN1924.jpg

    BTW, I just purchased a replacement Mauser 98 cleaning rod through Amazon of all places -- not sure whether it would be compatible with a 7mm though.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0722MD1Q9/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2020
  4. Charly2020!

    Charly2020! Member

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    Hi @indy1919a4, Yes, the plate on the stock has the name of a General of the Mexican Army. I did some research on Wikipedia and it seems this General was also the Governor of the state of "Queretaro".....interesting story.
     
  5. Charly2020!

    Charly2020! Member

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    Hello Dave,

    Thank you very much for your insight. If I may, I have a couple of additional questions I'd appreciate your help answering:

    1. Is this Mauser a FN Model 24? FN Model 24 series? Can you help me narrow down the precise model?
    2. How can I verify the firing pin is working? I've tried searching for a good tutorial (video) but haven't found one. ​
     
  6. wiscoaster

    wiscoaster Member

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    Do you have a bullet-puller? Remove the bullet, empty the powder, insert the emptied cartridge (without bullet) in the chamber, close the bolt, pull the trigger, fire the primer (observing good muzzle discipline & consideration for what neighbors might think). Note #1: it's still pretty loud, so use hearing protection. I've done this for multiple rifles in multiple calibers with no problems. Note #2: some rifles you risk damaging the extractor manually chambering a single shot, so be aware of that. Not a problem with Mausers, as far as I know.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2020
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  7. Dave DeLaurant

    Dave DeLaurant Member

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    Yes, yes and FN Mexican contract of 1926-27. The Mexican crest and receiver ring date makes the specific contract pretty clear, and the features are consistent with the photos in Ball:

    MexFN1924a.jpg MexFN1924b.jpg

    You'll likely find Belgian proof marks under the stock line, but if I recall correctly there are no date-specific clues from FN or the proof house during this period of manufacture.

    Post-WWII, FN went to a stamped date code indicating the year and quarter of manufacture.

    A simple inspection of firing pin protrusion won't really indicate whether the spring is adequate, so the most positive method is to take a cartridge (preferably one of recent make), pull the bullet and dump out the powder, point the rifle in a safe direction and try snapping the action on the empty primed case. If it doesn't go bang, there may be a problem. Check afterward for depth of firing pin depression on the primer and any appearance of unevenness.

    BTW, if you have to do this using an old military cartridge, clean the bore and action with some Balistol mixed with water (moosemilk) or just plain soap and water -- old cartridges often have corrosive chlorate primers. Dry thoroughly and inspect the next day for any hint of rust before oiling, and repeat the cleaning as necessary. Dealing with old corrosive primers is another conversation, and a problem I prefer to avoid entirely.
     
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  8. indy1919a4

    indy1919a4 Member

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    Heck forget that pulling bullet noise... :) take it to the range and put some rounds through it...

    A MANS GOTTA SHOOT... A GUNS GOTTA BE SHOT....
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2020
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  9. indy1919a4

    indy1919a4 Member

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    I have seen a fair number of MExican FNs modified to other calibers and still retain the unaltered look... One example in 7.62..

    https://www.gunbroker.com/item/880594199

    I Have seen a few of them in 308.. and look unaltered. I have never pinned down if this was just an abundance of 7.62 mauser barrels on the market and guys changing them or if this was something done by an army somewhere.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2020
  10. indy1919a4

    indy1919a4 Member

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    dup
     
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  11. Dave DeLaurant

    Dave DeLaurant Member

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    Now I want one of these too!

    I still regret passing on a pristine Chilean Mauser (Steyr M1912, I think) converted to .308 that I handled at a gunshop back in the early 1990s -- for some reason I had a prejudice against straight bolt handles then.
     
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  12. Crunchy Frog

    Crunchy Frog Member

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    I saw one of these short rifles at a local gun show. My research said that surviving specimens are often in poor condition. Your photos show a rifle in a little better condition than the one I examined.

    I thought the combination of FN manufacture with the Mexican crest on the receiver was neat.
     
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  13. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    This is worth a Buy recommendation.
    But, please get a chamber cast and/or a gunsmith to verify the caliber with go/no go gauges. As noted above, modifications are very common with these (Mexican law does not allow civilians to own "military" ammo).

    Condition on this one suggest it may have been sticky fingered and spent its time en la pared sobre la chimenea.
     
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  14. indy1919a4

    indy1919a4 Member

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    The Mexican Republic Mauser crest is a real beauty.. But to be fair most (all?) South American Mauser crests are beautiful.

    pix762717114.jpg
     
  15. Crunchy Frog

    Crunchy Frog Member

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    Agreed;
     
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  16. Charly2020!

    Charly2020! Member

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    @indy1919a4 Do you know how to interpret the stamps/markings on this Mauser? I was reading that although it has a 1924 stamp under the Mexican crest, it may be a M30. I want to double check ;)
     
  17. indy1919a4

    indy1919a4 Member

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    The best way is to measure the receiver. Measure the tang to the front of the receiver. If its a Fn model 1924 the receiver should be 8 1/2" long.. FN model 1930 the receiver is 8 3/4" long. My guess its a model 24... But that is without me measuring tape.
     
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  18. Charly2020!

    Charly2020! Member

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    Hello @Mr. Zorg,

    I came across some of your responses on another Mauser-related blog and thought you may have an opinion regarding my post :)

    I'd really appreciate any feedback about the markings, the history of the rifle itself, etc. Here's a new question. If this is indeed a 7x57 Mauser in, will you use Partizan 139gr ammo?
     
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