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Henry or marlin

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by TUBBY1, Jul 10, 2009.

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  1. TUBBY1

    TUBBY1 Member

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    Looking for advice on which one to get. Marlin1894 in 357 or henry big boy357? Tell me please, pros and cons
     
  2. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Marlin 1894

    It's a much lighter gun than the Henry, really easy to clean completely and from the breach, loads from the side, and mine shoots .38 LSWCs really well. Accurate, zero recoil.
     
  3. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    Marlin
     
  4. exdetsgt

    exdetsgt Member

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    BUT - sometimes heavier is better?
     
  5. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Sometimes heavier is better. I wouldn't want a 5 lb. 10 Gauge shotgun.

    However, I don't want a 9 lb. pistol-caliber lever gun, either.:)
     
  6. Greybeard7

    Greybeard7 Member

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    Heavier is better if someone else is doing the carrying. As ArmedBear pointed out, heavier isn't necessary in a pistol caliber lever action.

    A Marlin .357 lever and a good .357 revolver is a good combination IMO. For a walk in the woods, or some emergency situations, I think it would be a versatile and reliable option.

    GB7
     
  7. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Note that hot .357 loads still don't kick much in a light carbine. And my .38 fun loads make the 1894C feel like a 39A -- groups are similar, too.:)
     
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