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Hex nuts on scope mounts?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by MarkDido, Jul 9, 2006.

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  1. MarkDido

    MarkDido Member

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    Maybe I'm buying more "inexpensive" scopes (mag and red dot) but what is the rationale for using hex head nuts? If I have to tighten down 6 hex nuts to mount a scope, at least one of them will become "rounded" to the point of making it impossible to get a good purchase on it to sufficiently tighten it down. Is there a "fix" for this, like stainless steel replacements?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Clipper

    Clipper Member

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    Do you mean socket head cap screws? Hex head are six sided and use a wrench. Socket head cap screws use an allen key. SHCSs are generally hardened and will take much more torque before failing than most hex head bolts. My new Leupold mounts use Torx head screws, which are pretty much the equivalent of standard SHCSs.
     
  3. gezzer

    gezzer Member

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    Because most Bubahas screw up the slots in real screws using the hardware screw drivers.
     
  4. Koobuh

    Koobuh Member

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    I'm pretty sure he's talking about the female type screws that require an Allen-wrench (or 'hex-key' or 'angle wrench') to turn them.
    You should be able to find replacement ones at a well-stocked and competent hardware store. Good luck at a big-box store. Just bring the particular screw with you when you go and they should be able to figure it out.
    Also; I have found that if you tilt the key a bit while it's in the head of the screw you can get a bit better of purchase on it.
    Getting a high-quality set of metric and SAE hex keys wouldn't hurt either; they'll last longer and are less likely to round-out your screws, just as a correctly sized and properly shaped screwdriver won't round out heads as easily as a cheapo one.
     
  5. entropy

    entropy Member

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    The better quality mounts use Torx head screws.
     
  6. cowboy77845

    cowboy77845 Member

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    Mounting Srews

    I prefer them to slotted screws. I never have the correct size screwdriver for them. Have replaced all my slotted screws. Do not most rings use a standard screw? I think you can get replacement assortments from Brownells.
    My gunsmith seems to always have a bunch in a platic container.
     
  7. mrmeval

    mrmeval Member

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    Allen or torx are superior to stupid slots or phillips.
     
  8. Mal H

    Mal H Administrator

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    "Do not most rings use a standard screw?"

    Yes, in general, a set of 6-40, 6-48 and 8-40 will fit 95% of US made scope rings (the other 5% have had their screw holes buggered up beyond all hope). I'm not sure what the metric fine-thread equivalent would be, but since most rings bought here are US made anyway, the screw sizes listed will usually work no matter what brand the scope is.
     
  9. hoghunting

    hoghunting Member

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    If you are tightening the screws so tight that you're stripping the Allen head screw, you are overtightening those screws. Those are small screws, just lighten up on the Allen wrench.
     
  10. Zak Smith

    Zak Smith Moderator Emeritus

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    +1 hoghunting

    Use the right size allen bit or wrench to not strip the bolts.

    Ring cap screws don't need very much torque, less than 30 in*lbs usually.

    -z
     
  11. Clark

    Clark Member

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    I like Torx when I can get them.

    I bought an assortment from Brownell's

    I made some 6-48 nuts with a tap.

    I grind the screws to length while the nuts are on the screw.
    It helps hold them and straightens out the threads at the end as the nut is taken off.

    http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/catsearch.aspx?k=torx

    The 12 pack is about $0.50 per screw, so don't drop them:)
     
  12. RogersPrecision

    RogersPrecision Member

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    There are always going to be a few that truly require a 4 page instruction sheet with a hammer.
    :confused:
     
  13. brickeyee

    brickeyee Member

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    "...tilt the key a bit while it's in the head of the screw you can get a bit better of purchase on it."

    A correctly sized hex key should not have enough play to tilt at all in the socket.
    Do not buy or use ‘no-name’ hex keys. Almost invariably they are not sized correctly or hardened correctly.
    Bondhus & Allen are two good makers that are usually available if you look.

    When working at a friends house reconditioning a milling machine he handed me a 3/8 hex key for a cap screw. It now has a 90 degree rotation in the short arm from the bend to the tip. No ‘cheater’ just hand force. It cost less than $2 at the local hardware store and did not have a brand marking on it.
    I had to drive home to get a Bondhus set to finish the job.
     
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