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Hog hunt 10-10-09

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by tnieto2004, Oct 17, 2009.

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  1. mstirton

    mstirton Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
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    Location:
    Manchaca, TX
    Why do you want a Mossberg when you have the R1? I've heard the Mossberg is nice and should easily get you 5cm groups @ 100m. I think I'd rather have the Savage 11 for an inexpensive 308. The new ones have a better trigger and stock (Accutrigger, Accustock) than the Mossberg and might only be $100 more.
     
  2. Fernando

    Fernando Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
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    A friend of mine was importing a pile of rifles and asked me if I wanted one because they were cheap. I said that I was going to think about it and that I would get back to him a few days later with the answer, but he then said: if you order later, I cannot guarantee you a good price. So I said: how much is the rifle? And He said: real cheap. And I said ok. I chose the caliber .308 (different from what I currently have – 30.06) and he told me what brand was it (Mossberg), lol.

    The Mossberg will cost less than half of the meopta (that spend the days stored in the closet), less than one third of the R1 and less than one forth of the zeiss, so why the hell shouldn’t I get one? I just need it to shoot straight at 100 or 150 meters.

    The R1 is very accurate but is a pain in the ass to keep it clean. The gases are corrosive and the accumulation of the carbon can make it jam when expelling the cartridge. The chromium from inner parts will go away very fast if you don’t clean the mechanism after shooting few rounds. The dealer in Portugal says it’s normal, lol.

    At night I usually need one shot only. No need for a semi-auto or a bigger caliber if I don’t expect close encounters or if I am planning to take home a little fellow (the boars with 50 to 60kg are the best, because you can drag or carry them without having to call friends to help you, lol - more than 70kg and you are screwed, not only because it is dark but you may have to cross streams or hills to get to the car with the bloody pig).

    I had bolt action rifles before and they were pretty accurate (had a mannlicher sbs 96 classic). And need no demanding cleaning. Don’t expect the mossberg to be as much accurate but I trust it can hold as much dirt, lolol, because I don’t want to spend my days with a brush and oil.

    When hunting in daytime fast moving pigs, will use the R1 30.06 (most people here uses 9,3x62). At nigh (from growing quarter of moon to full moon), will use the Mossberg .308, unless I expect the presence of a big and old boar. The R1 will keep using the all other scopes, including the night vison, and mossberg will use the meopta 3-12x56 RD with fixed mounts.

    2rep8o6.jpg

    Don’t know about you, but here we can hunt boars at night, standing still (the process is called “waiting”), in the 8 nights before full moon until the night after the full moon (total of 10 nights). There are few things as beautiful and exciting as hunting wild boars at night. And they are smart, I tell you (especially the older ones). They can get next to you without you knowing they are there, or they can be still in the same spot for 3 or 4 hours without dragging a foot or make some kind of noise, just trying to smell or hear something. And they can grow big, lololol

    30rxv8z.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2010
  3. Fernando

    Fernando Member

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    Messages:
    158
    I forgot to say thanks for the info on the mossberg

    Thank you, Mstirton

    Try to imagine this at night, with the sky full of stars and the moon over your head. And then some noise, a black shadow… and baaaam, lololol.

    313nbet.jpg

    i4hbi9.jpg

    5eimvp.jpg

    Photos in hdr, taken with canon 350D.
     
  4. Fernando

    Fernando Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    158
    Something like this but with less horizon light:

    wlxagk.jpg
     
  5. Fernando

    Fernando Member

    Joined:
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    I’ve heard about the savage rifles, but if I order something from a catalogue, the gun would probably be imported alone, and the price would be higher. Every gun that enters the country must be inspected by the police, and high taxes are due. If a gun enters alone, it will pay those taxes alone, because most of them are fixed taxes. If the gun comes with other, the total of the taxes is dissolved by each, and the importer can sell them cheaper.

    We are a small country and there are not many rifles in stock at the stores. If a store needs one to sell to a customer, many times even the distributor (central dealer of the brand for Portugal) has to order it from the States, or other European countries, because he also doesn’t have it in stock. It’s the same thing with the ammo. Every lot of ammo imported has to be inspected, samples are taken, and costumers wait months and months for everything that is not in stock. And pay a fortune.

    The Mossberg will cost half than a CZ 550, and the CZ is our less expensive bolt rifle. A R1, semi-auto, or a browning bar (also semi auto), will cost almost twice the CZ. A browning x-bolt costs more than the double of the Mossberg. A bloody set of EAW pivot mounts (rings and bases) cost as much or even more than the Mossberg (if imported in a lot, with others).

    This is the other side of the Atlantic, lol. We don’t have much guns walking around. We cannot even advertise our used guns if we want to sell them, lol. The fine is about 1000 euros. Only dealers can advertise guns and only in speciality magazines.

    But we are different in many ways too, because we don’t hunt what you hunt. We pursue mostly wild boars. In daytime, we make a circle or a line with hunters, and then force the boars with dogs to that line or to the edges of the circle - we call that process “Batida”: the hunters stay still (at more or less 100 meters from each other) and wait for the dogs to find and make the boars run out of their hidings. The dogs are grown and trained to do that so they are very good at. In night time, we can wait for the boars in the woods (10 nights a month) – the process is called “Espera”.

    Boars are very resistant animals (made of heavy muscle and bones), so we have no use for calibres smaller than a .30 caliber. In fact, in “Batida”, most people uses 9,3x62, 9,3x64, 375h&h or even higher and heavier bullets, and practically no one uses the .308, because it has no stopping power with adult boars (if the boar doesn’t stop in front of you, the next guy in line, about 100 meters to your right or left, will probably get a chance of killing it, and you don’t want that lol). In semi-auto rifles we can only use 3 rounds (one in the chamber and two in the magazine), so we have to aim real good at a fast and unpredictable target. And some boars take 4, 5 and more shots until they drop dead, even if hit in mortal areas – a boar can run more than 100 meters with pierced lungs and I’ve seen them run for more than 40 or 60 meters with heart shots.

    So, the smaller calibre used in “Batida” is the 30.06 (no one risks using less), and usually with heavy bullets (200 or 220 gr). Some use .300 win magnum, and that is a powerfull round, but pierces the boars too fast, not causing as much damage nor having the same stopping power as a 9,3mm bullet. Some use .338, but because it is not so common, bullets are much more expensive and difficult to find.

    At night, in “Espera”, we can use .308 and 30.06 without major problems, because the boars are not running but standing still. We can aim real good, use a tripod or bipod, wait for them to present us with a good position to shoot. We can also lose a boar really easy, though, if we choose a wrong bullet type, or if we precipitate the shot. And it is dark. And there is a muzzle glare. And sometimes the boars were in a group of 9 or 12 and after the shot everybody runs, and although one is mortally shot you don’t know which way he went, lol. And you have to track it at nigh, sometimes with few or no blood. And they have teeth that can open you up real fast, or make a hole in you before you can see it coming.

    That’s why we don’t use anything less than 180gr bullets, lolol
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2010
  6. Fernando

    Fernando Member

    Joined:
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    Calibers :scrutiny:

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