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Holster To Tight

Discussion in 'Handguns: Holsters and Accessories' started by 0ne3, Dec 28, 2016.

  1. 0ne3

    0ne3 Member

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    Probley talked about this before, but for us newbes, may we talk about it again. My revolver is a bit tight fitting in my leather holster. What is the best way you have found to loosen the holsters tightness so the revolver slides in and out fairly smooth.
     
    RetiredUSNChief likes this.
  2. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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    Last edited: Dec 28, 2016
  3. drunkenpoacher

    drunkenpoacher Member

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    My leather holsters have loosened up after some use. I have one for a 1911 that was really tight when it was new. I put powdered graphite in it, a little messy the first few days but it draws and re-holsters nicely now.
     
  4. Malamute

    Malamute Member

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    I find most leather holsters are too loose. I prefer them to hold the gun in place when turned upside down and gently shaken, without the straps fastened. It should release the gun with a firm pull when needed. You can tighten some of them up with a leather cord in the right place to snug up the welt below the trigger guard. Ive found that a holster made for a slightly smaller gun often fits like I prefer, such as one for a Colt SA can often fit a Ruger just about right. If the gun is loose in the holster and moves around I think it wears the finish more than one that's snug and doesn't move.
     
  5. Red Cent

    Red Cent Member

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    "(do not! I repeat, do not!! wet or spray the holster with any solution to aid in the stretching process)." Water?

    I routinely SOAK a SASS holster in water and stuff a blue gun in the holster for sizing. I do not mold a SASS holster. Try to come out fast of a detailed molded holster. I brush on a very light coat of Aussie Cream when dry. The leather will last for years.

    I also make holsters jet black with vinagroon. Talk about getting them wet. PS: Vinagroon has been used on holsters for over a hundred years.

    Most any revolver has retention because of four points of contact. Sometimes five. 3:00 and 9:00 on the cylinder, same positions on the barrel, and the top of the front sight (not always). A semi-auto is a totally different animal.

    The easy way is to place a damp rag into the holster at the points of cylinder contact or simply press the rag with your finger to the indentations only. Place a strip of scotch tape on the cylinder at the two aforementioned points (slick and just thick enough). Push the revolver firmly in the holster and put in a good warm (if possible) place to dry for about an hour. All that is needed that you increase the depth of the indentations just a tad. Take the revolver out and let it dry overnight.

    If the front sight is dragging, then get a big file..............just kidding. Hold the holster in such a way that when you pour warm water into the holster it will soak the sight channel. Cut a pencil and place between the front sight and the top strap. Secure with, what else, duct tape. Gotta be a tad taller than the front sight. Stuff the revolver in the holster. :) Let it dry.

    Miss RC Model.
     
  6. 0ne3

    0ne3 Member

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    Please, do not get upset. You mentioned vinagroon. I never herd of vinagroon, so i tried to look it up, all I found was Some kind of bug.
     
  7. JohnnyFlake

    JohnnyFlake Member

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    Over the years, I have found that the best way to fit a gun to a holster, is to holster the gun and then put the holstered gun into a large zip lock bag and seal it. Then put it away for a few weeks, or even longer if you can wait. I have found that after a month or so, the gun and holster seem to meld together and the fit will be perfect.
     
  8. doubleh

    doubleh Member

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    I don't soak them like Red Cent but I do dunk them in water and then stuff the protected gun in the holster and then place it out of the way and not in sunlight to dry for a couple of days if it's warm weather or for a few days when it's cool. So far it's worked every time.
     
  9. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    "...Water?..." Yep. Plain, warm, tap water. Holster needs to be wet, but not dripping. Then wrap in Saran wrap, stick the firearm in and set the whole aside to naturally air dry. About 24 hours is enough. No ovens, hand dryers or anything else either. Leather stretches a bit when wet then shrinks.
    Put a leather holster in a warm oven(lowest setting) and it'll shrink to itty and bitty in a couple hours. Know a guy who was making a leather bottle who did that. The bottle went from 1 litre to less than 1 ounce capacity. Do it with a firearm in and you'll have to cut it out.
     
  10. guyfromohio

    guyfromohio Member

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    I've gotten about a dozen Holsters from TT Gunleather in the past year or so. Every one of them is tight when I open the package. I take the ziplock bag it comes in, stick the intended gun in it and then stick it in the holster. Every single one is good to go by the next AM.
     
  11. guyfromohio

    guyfromohio Member

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  12. DT Guy

    DT Guy Member

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    I would hesitate to wet a FINISHED holster to change its fit; once the acrylic finish goes on, it should not absorb any water, and if it does it's likely going to be damaged by it, IMHO.


    Larry
     
  13. Red Cent

    Red Cent Member

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    Too many cracks and holes (needles). It will take water.
     
  14. Red Cent

    Red Cent Member

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    Vinagroon.

    The recipe is to take one gallon of white vinegar and pour into something you can cap. Can't be airtight. Drop two 00 steel wool pads in the vinegar. I use a plastic kitty kitter bucket. The reaction will produce a little gas (not toxic) so it needs to bleed off. After a couple days stir lightly. About a week, take a piece of leather and lower it into the mixture a couple of inches. Should turn dark very quickly. This is not a dye. It is a reaction with the tannins in the leather. I cut a cowboy holster pattern and dip the whole thing in the vinagroon. I like to get the vinagroon all the way through. I then take it next door to the washroom and run a couple of inches of water in the big deep square sink. Sprinkle about a 1/4 cup of baking soda in the water and stir. Soak the piece of leather about the same amount of time you had it in the vinagroon. This cancels the acidity of the vinegar. RUST!! Rinse decently and hang to dry. When dry, buff with an old towel. Aussie cream will make it a deeper black. When the holster is finished, spray your favorite sealer on it and it will be beautiful.
    The vinagroon can be rejuvenated once in a while. Drop in another wool pad. Let it set for a day or two and stir.
    Point: It will not make your skin black. BUT, any piece of leather you touch before you rinse your hands, you will leave permanent fingerprints/smudges.
     
  15. Red Cent

    Red Cent Member

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    Chuck is famous for his leather work.

    /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    Chuck Burrows posted this in 2010:

    VINEGAR BLACK
    For giving color to the grain of leather there is no blacking that will at all compare with the well known vinegar black. This may be made in various ways. The simplest, and, without doubt, the best, is to procure shavings from an iron turner (note: some folks get the turnings from brake drums) and cover them with pure cider vinegar; heat up and set aside for a week or two, then heat again and set in a cool place for two weeks; pour off the vinegar, allow it to stand for a few days, and draw off and cork up in bottles. This will keep for a long time, and, while producing a deep black on leather, will not stain the hands.

    How I do it most times:
    I use de-oiled 4/0 steel wool: dip in acetone, squeeze out the extra and hang to dry – then tear or cut into small pieces. Add one pads worth of the de-oiled steel wool to one quart of white or cider vinegar – I use those plastic coffee “cans” and punch a single small hole in the lid to let of any gas buildup. Let it set in the hot sun which will speed the reaction. I let it set for about two weeks until there is only a light vinegar odor left and/or the bulk of the steel wool has been dissolved. I also keep a new batch “cooking” all the time so I have a constant supply.
    For the deepest black, apply a bath of strong black tea first (this increase the tannins) and let it soak in good, then apply a generous amount of the vinegar black. Let set for about a half hour and then rinse with a mix of baking soda and warm water, about a 1/8 cup soda to a half gallon of water, apply let set for a few minutes and then rinse off. While still damp apply a light coat or two of your favorite saddle oil. Once dry top coat as normal
    Experiment – I test a piece of each new side without oiling to see how well it takes the blacking, if need be I’ll do a second black tea mix to darken, then apply the oil which also helps darken.

    Instead of steel wool you can use chopped up bailing or fence wire – the smaller the better since it will dissolve in the vinegar bath faster.

    1) Does the ‘rooning process change the color of natural thread? No
    2) Should I sew before or after I apply the vinegaroon? either way – your choice
    3) For the ‘rooning process, how do you apply it? Dip the item, dauber it on, brush it on, etc? Could the vinegaroon be kept in a spray bottle and sprayed on the item? all of the above – which ever way works best for you and the item you are working on. I prefer dIp dying since it is simply the easiest for me, but I also brush it on for larger pieces – a spray bottle should work fine, but you would need to filter it good to prevent any clogging
     
  16. Cowhide Cliff

    Cowhide Cliff Member

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    Best batch of Vinegaroon I've made is with rusty nails. It looks like a nasty mess but turns leather really nice black.

    Also a lot of steel wool has a oily coating on it. If you use steel wool take a torch to it first. Works much better.
     
  17. Dog Soldier
    • Contributing Member

    Dog Soldier Member

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    You don't use water or vinegar. We are not making Dill pickles. Any saddle or tack maker will tell you to use rubbing alcohol. Just rub some 98% alcohol on the inside of the holster. Wrap the gun in plastic wrap. It will form and not damage the leather. Follow up with saddle soap.:)
     
  18. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    I just put the gun in the holster and wear it a while.
     
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  19. DT Guy

    DT Guy Member

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    Well, it will 'take water' but I don't think it will be uniform enough to correctly change the fit of the holster; and for those of us who acrylic-dip our holsters, it won't actually take on much water from the stitch (or other) holes.

    Larry
     
  20. drunkenpoacher

    drunkenpoacher Member

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    Very effective but nowhere near complicated enough.
     
  21. AZAndy
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    AZAndy Member

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    I put the gun in a freezer bag, jam it in the holster, and leave it for a day or so. Just went through that with a Sig 1911, as the slide is a bit oversized.
     
  22. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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    For what it's worth, they make holsters specifically designed for the SIG profile slides, if that was the problem you encountered.
     
  23. Cooldill

    Cooldill Member

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    Place the well oiled revolver in a plastic bag. Wet the interior of the holster with rubbing alcohol. Insert the gun firmly and leave overnight to dry.
     

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