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Homebrew holsters made by me,show me what you have made! LONG POST and many pic's!

Discussion in 'Handguns: Holsters and Accessories' started by DasFriek, Dec 21, 2009.

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  1. Smith357

    Smith357 Member

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    So many nice home made holsters here I'm almost too embarrassed to show mine, almost.

    So here it is an IWB appendix carry for a 4" M&P.


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  2. dovedescending

    dovedescending Member

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    The first one I have made, hopefully not to be the last. I've learned a few things about design in the process:

    1. Next time angle the belt slots.
    2. Next time don't use saddle leather.
    3. Next time let the holster dry with the gun in it for more than 12 hours.

    Used a #1 leather punch, an awl, and my daddy's old Barlow knife. Oh, and I used wood glue instead of leather cement.

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  3. bamabiker

    bamabiker Member

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    Hey guys, keep it up. It's like anything else, the more you do it the better you'll get.
    Here's a couple of my latest.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. rayban

    rayban Member

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    Kinda hate to post this right after BamaBiker's, but holsters like his have inspired me to get back to doing a little carving......kinda rusty....no, truth is, I've always sucked at it....time for a lesson.
    But as I continue to play "dress up" with my 442, here tis in "old school".

    [​IMG]
     
  5. bamabiker

    bamabiker Member

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    Hey Ray, I think that looks pretty nice and you've got some really nice stuff on your website.
     
  6. rayban

    rayban Member

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    Bama, you're too kind, and I thank you...but I know enough about it to know my carving is not in the same league as yours....but Ill be working on it:banghead:
     
  7. EVIL

    EVIL Member

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    Rayban, Bamabiker - your holster are works of art! Thanks for suppling the rest of us flegeling leatherworkers with inspiration. I don't carve leather yet (only stamp) - but I need to get started!

    I love checking out all the holsters made by folks on here...keep them comming.
     
  8. Eaglestroker

    Eaglestroker Member

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    Great looking carving guys! A few Christmas presents:

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  9. rccolt.45

    rccolt.45 Member

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    I started out like several of you. Keep at it and you can soon make something like this

    [​IMG]

    This is all hand made. YOu can see more at my web site landsharkleather.com
     
  10. Joel

    Joel Member

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    Older thread I'll resurrect for a bit of insight. I do this as a part-time business but do not consider myself any sort of expert and these are just my humble opinions.

    When designing a holster three things need to be considered and should be considered in this order:
    1) Safety
    2) Function
    3) Form

    Not to pick on Eaglestroker, but when I see a 1911 with a fully exposed trigger, I almost jump back away from the screen. This fits into the safety aspect. Make sure for all but single-action-only cowboy holsters your trigger guards are covered and the leather in that area can NEVER find its way into the guard. Additionally, ensure that the handgun is well retained. Either do this through the molding process or by adding a retention strap.

    Regarding function, the holster must meet the purpose of the handgun. I make leather holsters but often times wear plastic for IDPA. Why? It is what works for me. I carry leather and make sure that at least one practice out of the month I use my carry gear. If you add a thumb-break, you must practice with it. When taking orders, I try and talk customers out of thumb-breaks because I know 90% of them will not practice enough with it to commit it to muscle memory. If the holster is hard to get to or hard to pull the handgun from, it will do you no good when TSHTF. Pocket holsters are popular with the micros and work fine when standing. What about being car-jacked? How about having to take cover before drawing and crouching behind cover? Can you get to it. Some can, some can't. Consider these things when designing.

    Final consideration is form. If I make ugly holsters, I don't sell many holsters so this is a business thing for me, but it does tie into the above two points for you. Stitching and molding are a part of the form. Stitching too close to the holster edge, not using a stitching groove, using thread that is too light-weight, using stitches like chain-stitches (the stitch produced with those stitching awls) will all cause premature wear of the thread. Even if you are using industrial glues (Barge Original comes to mind which you need a tax ID # to purchase in any significant quantity here in PA), your stitching is the lifeline of your holster. I did an experiment with one of my double-layer belts and left it glued with Barge Original and un-stitched. Started separating in 3 months after daily wear. Since most do not own a sewing machine large enough to handle T69 and bigger thread punching through 1/4"+ of leather, hand sewing is your only option. Diamond awl, harness needles and saddle stitching take time, but are easy to master with practice. Get the above tools plus an edge-guided stitching groover, a free-hand stitching groover, stitching spacer (pricking iron or overstich wheel), descent beeswax thread and buy or make a stitching pony. All can be had from either Tandy Leather Factory, Springfield Leather or any of the other leather supply merchants or even on Ebay (which has tools that are made much better than most produced today and will work fine with a little TLC).

    Leather used should be Veg-Tanned sides, shoulders, backs, or bends (or butts if you want to get into horsehide). Belly leather will work for a bit but will soften up over time and loose the retention and drawing properties you need. Best to stick with leather weights between 6oz and 10oz. Smaller weights are to flimsy unless doubled-up and larger weights are too thick.

    Again, these are my opinions based on my experiences so take the advice for what you paid for it and YMMV.
     
  11. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    I agree. I call my holsters for the .45 "Four Safety Holsters." That includes the grip safety, the manual safety lock, the covered trigger and the leather cam that keeps the safety lock positively engaged.

    As for single action revolvers, the uncovered trigger was basically for fast draw. While some 19th century holsters had uncovered triggers, most didn't. Ironically, when you look at the ultimate "fast draw" holsters, you see they were so insecure, they needed a leather thong over the hammer -- a prescription for suicide in a real fast draw situation!

    I make my SAA holsters with covered trigger guards. Draw a line from the hammer to the back of the trigger guard, that that describes my SAA holster. A holster like that, well moulded to the gun, has no need for a safety strap -- and that includes carry on horseback.
     
  12. Eaglestroker

    Eaglestroker Member

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    Joel, you obviously have no problem throwing my designs under the bus but I will keep this factual. Can you in fact show me a case involving a 1911 going off because of an exposed trigger? How, exactly, do you propose that the gun would go off because of an open trigger guard when you have a safety molded into the on position AND a grip safety that must be depressed before firing? I've tried and can't get the hammer to drop in one. I prefer to think of my most important safety feature as the one between my or my customers ears. This obviously isn't for everyone.

    You won't ever find a Glock holster with that style of holster and there is a reason for it.

    I will ask as it is a bit perplexing, what scenario is created where an exposed trigger on a single action revolver caused one to fire? This would require not only the hammer to be cocked (never seen a SA revolver carried cocked and locked) and someone fired in the holster? I don't make single action holsters but am curious.
     
  13. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    Yes. As you shove the gun into the holster, you hold it in the firing position -- often depressing the grip safety. If the safety lock is disengaged and your finger is on the trigger, BANG! I know of one instance where an M1911 went off under those circumstances -- it was being carried in a locally-made buffalo leather holster in Viet Nam that was designed like a "fast draw" holster.

    Not at all uncommon to have an ND with an exposed trigger SAA holster -- Sammy Davis, Junior had one during the "fast draw" craze of the '50s and '60s. What happens is the finger enters the trigger guard while the gun is still in the holster. At the same time, the hammer is cocked. You can wind up holding a cocked SAA, finger on the trigger, and the gun still partially or wholly in the holster.

    In fact, SAA "fast draw" holsters of that era had steel stiffeners designed to allow the cylinder to rotate (and the gun to be cocked) while still completely in the holster.
     
  14. Eaglestroker

    Eaglestroker Member

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    Thanks Vern, for the informative post. I should also add that I have never made an open trigger guard for anyone other than myself. I like a minimalist holster when working that doesn't take up a lot of real estate. Notice I stated that the best safety IMO is the one between our ears? I don't trust everyones' and that is why I have and never will sell a version of that holster to the public. Thanks for your honest concern and upfront explanation.

    -Robert
     
  15. rayban

    rayban Member

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    Robert, I started out with that same Al Stohlman design but went off it a little.....well, maybe a lot.......but I elected to cover up more of the trigger guard, next time, maybe a wee bit more.
    I really like the looks of yours.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Eaglestroker

    Eaglestroker Member

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    Glad someone else recognized the pattern, Rayban. Nice looking rig. Let's get this thread back on track:

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  17. leatherworker

    leatherworker Member

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    I thought I would try and revive this thread. Here is a little black and white XD Gear..

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  18. kenjabroni

    kenjabroni Member

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    very very nice holsters there leatherworker. There are some very talented guys out there
     
  19. bamabiker

    bamabiker Member

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    leatherworker that is some very professional looking goods you have there. What stitching method do you use?
    Beautiful work!
    The last two I made.
    For a M19 snubbie
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    For a Highway Patrolman
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    I guess this flower pattern has become my favorite. Not necessarily because I like it the best but it does seem to come out pretty good.
    Keep up the good work all you leather workers.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  20. rayban

    rayban Member

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    Leather worker, I've never been a fan of white stitching on black leather.....until I see your work...beautiful!

    Bamabiker....yes I see that floral pattern has become your signature...and along with the pancake style it really looks great.
     
  21. leatherworker

    leatherworker Member

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    Thanks Rayban and Bamabiker,
    Bama I use a Tippmann Boss for my stitching with 277 thread on top and bottom with a angled chisel point needle. You have some beautiful carving there Bamabiker.
     
  22. smalls

    smalls Member

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    Leatherworker, that's some very nice looking leather. Very classy looking :). I feel like I'd need to wear a suit with that, haha.
     
  23. saitek

    saitek Member

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    holsters

    here are a couple that i made to fit 2" web belt's or big leather belt's one for my 1911 and the other for my amt long slide . just tooled up some leather and laced it up .
     

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  24. SniperStraz

    SniperStraz Member

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    ^^^
    Nice work!
    Do you carry a 1911 with the trigger exposed?
     
  25. saitek

    saitek Member

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    holster

    no unfortunitly i do not carry,just for the range.
     
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