Hornady One Shot Primer Sealer

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by tink77, Oct 30, 2013.

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  1. tink77

    tink77 Member

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    Anyone used this stuff, If so what did you think of it?
     
  2. jwrowland77

    jwrowland77 Member

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    Never used it but if I was to seal my primers with something, I'd probably just use some of my wife's fingernail polish. You could actually color code them that way as to the load. Or you could just use clear. Probably be cheaper that way, and my wife would probably think she's going through her fingernail polish. LOL :D
     
  3. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

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    I use pink:D

    Never sealed a primer but as above I hear fingernail polish works just as well. Buy some cheap stuff. Paint it on and wipe off so it's just in the groove.
     
  4. tink77

    tink77 Member

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    Not sure I need to seal the primers, but I saw this stuff and wanted to learn more about it. But fingernail polish sounds easier and cheaper.
     
  5. Comrade Mike

    Comrade Mike Member

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    Unless it's for very long term storage (I buy factory ammo for that) I don't bother with primer sealing. My reloads are made to shoot.
     
  6. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

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    No reason to seal them unless maybe some hunting loads that may be exposed to rain or snow Unless you are a "prepper" and plan on burying them:uhoh:
     
  7. MtnCreek

    MtnCreek Member

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    I've not used Hornady sealant. I have another brand (I think it's George & Roys?). It paints on like fingernail polish, but I think it's a lot thinner than fingernail polish. Just a little bit where the primer meets the case and it flows around the primer. Thinning fingernail polish may give the same result.
     
  8. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

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    Years ago I used some of my wife's nail polish. But I only did that a few times and haven't found a need to go that far since.

    I have had loads without sealed primers that have been submerged in water, more than once. I came home one day and found a bunch of my reloads, high powered rifle stuff, handgun loads, and a huge stash of shot gun shells. All had been completely submerged in water for hours. I dried them up and put them into new ammo boxes. Some didn't get used for a good year or two, and all went bang.

    GS
     
  9. tink77

    tink77 Member

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    You never know, with the way this country is going, lead may become the new precious metal.
     
  10. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

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    I've loaded tens of thousands of rounds.

    Never "sealed" even one primer.

    Before you go to all that trouble to seal primers, you could load a half-dozen rounds and throw them in a pan of water for a day. Take them to the range and test them.
    See http://thefiringline.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3602284&postcount=9
     
  11. Potatohead

    Potatohead Member

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    What are youz guys' wives going to think about all of you playing with their makeup???:neener:


    I hope nail polish isnt the "gateway" makeup. If so, you all will be moving on to the hard stuff next! Mascara, blush, lip gloss....so it goes.
     
  12. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

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    So? You gave a problem with that? It matches my outfits!:neener:
     
  13. BruceB

    BruceB Member

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    Over the decades, a number (maybe twenty?) of my loads have found their way into the washing machine for a full cycle. EVERY ONE of those rounds fired normally when tested. Ergo: sealant is not necessary.

    However, I DO find color-identification of some rounds to be a valuable idea. I load several different "levels" of load in .44 Magnum brass. The first uses a clearly-different 200-grain bullet. The other two use the same bullet, the RCBS 250KT.

    The hotter load gets "hot" colors...red, yellow, pink, orange.

    The "cooler" load gets cooler colors.... blue, green, black etc.

    I use a model-paints kit from Walmart. A single bead of paint from a toothpick will run all around the primer, and after the paint has had time to set-up a bit a wipe with a solvent-dampened cloth will clean up the appearance nicely. (This works best with all the rounds held bullet-down in a cartridge box.)

    This paint treatment also has the side effect of sealing the primers...even if it IS un-needed.
     
  14. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    This!
    Sealing primers on reloads is a waste of time & money.

    I started reloading in 1962.
    And have hunted in every kind of wet you can imagine.

    I have even fished reloaded shotgun shells out of the bottom of a flooded duck blind at the end of the season, and they all fired just fine.

    When hunting in monsoon rail, I keep my extra ammo in plastic ammo boxes or a zip-lock bag anyway.


    (Unless you are a Navy SEAL, and plan to have to swim three miles, 60' under water to reach your objective on the beach.)

    In that case?
    The Navy will issue you sealed & waterproof mil-spec ammo to swim ashore with.

    rc
     
  15. tink77

    tink77 Member

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    I not really going to seal my primers, just seen this stuff and want to know more. I do like the paint idea to mark test loads. Use a different gr. by using different colors. Thanks, BruceB.
     
  16. Robert101

    Robert101 Member

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    If you want to use finger nail polish (which is great stuff for primer sealing) cut it with 40% acetone.
     
  17. powell&hyde

    powell&hyde Member

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    I can only remark is why? Never needed to seal primers since 1972, only 10 years behind RC.
     
  18. kimbernut
    • Contributing Member

    kimbernut Member

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    Primer sealer

    I went thru a stage where I sealed everything after a "phizt" instead of a bang on a rattlesnake in a Georgia rain with factory ammo. Tapered off to only sealing hunting rounds. Now I do not seal anything. If I knew I was going into a wet invironment for a hunt I would seal enough for the hunt. It's not like it takes a lot of extra time.
    You can actually make your own primer/bullet sealant with gunpowder and acetone. IIRC it is in the archives here on THR but really just mix to consistency.
     
  19. Swampman

    Swampman Old Fart

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    If sealing ammunition is such a waste of time, why is it done by every reputable military arsenal?

    Why have all the police duty rounds that I've ever seen been sealed?

    Why are there companies specializing in sealing ammunition?
    http://ammo.hernon.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=13&Itemid=7

    Just because you choose not to take the time to perform a particular step in order to increase the reliability of your ammunition doesn't mean that it's foolish or a waste of time.

    As for expense, 18 to 22 grains of single base powder (I use old 4895 pulled from WWII AP rounds) in an ounce of pure acetone (not the oily stuff sold to remove nail polish) makes an excellent primer sealer and it's about as close to free as you can get.

    If you like to use different colors to help ID your loads, just pull the guts out of an old, dried out magic marker and pour your acetone through that for color before you add the powder.

    I'm not advocating that everyone should seal all, or even any of their ammo. I will say that immersion tests I've done on unsealed ammunition didn't give near the 100% sure fire results that others here have reported.

    On the other hand, when primers are sealed with nitrocellulose and case mouths with Alox, I've had almost 100% percent fire rates with ammunition stored underwater at 5 psi gauge pressure (equal to @ 11 feet deep) for a week.

    I only seal a small percentage of the ammunition I load, mainly large game and SD loads, but there's no doubt in my mind that doing so substantially increases the reliability of rounds that might be exposed to significant amounts of moisture.
     
  20. howlnmad

    howlnmad Member

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    Maybe because the military doesn't have the option to only shoot in fair weather?
     
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