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Hotter than a two dollar pistol?

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by WhiteKnight, Aug 19, 2005.

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  1. WhiteKnight

    WhiteKnight Member

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    I'm a little confused as to where the phrase George Jones uses in his song "Hotter Than a Two Dollar Pistol" originates?

    I would assume it to be from the nature of an inexpensive (two dollar) pistol being one that would yield significantly higher chamber pressures (hotter) than a more expensive counterpart.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. larry starling

    larry starling Member

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    Im thinking he is refering to a stolen pistol? :cool:
     
  3. joey93turbo

    joey93turbo Member

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  4. TexasRifleman

    TexasRifleman Moderator Emeritus

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    Yes I'm sure George Jones is discussing chamber pressures..... :evil:



    Nope. "Hot" as in "stolen". 2 dollars as in fenced cheaply and quickly
    to the nearest pawn shop.
     
  5. TarpleyG

    TarpleyG Member

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    Ain't from around here, is he???

    Greg
     
  6. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Around a century ago (long before that song was written), cheap revolvers sold for $2 or less. They were often thin and poorly made, so firing them tended to make them heat up faster than a heavier gun with more metal in it.

    So, the phrase "hot as a two-dollar pistol" came into use, often referring to, let us say, a level of emotion indicated by a certain physical reaction. Sort of related to Mae West's famous quote, "Is that a pistol in your pocket or are you just glad to see me?"

    Jim
     
  7. RoyG

    RoyG Member

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    Location:
    Once upon a time a town called Rabbit Hash
    Hotter Then A Two Dollar Pistol

    I stopped off at the Quick-sack
    for some beer and cigarettes
    the old man took my money
    as he stared at my Corvette
    He said I had one just like her son
    in 1963
    'Til a man down at the bank took her from me

    Chorus:
    Oh, she was hotter than a two dollar pistol
    she was the fastest thing around
    long and lean every young man's dream
    she turned every head in town
    she was built, and fun to handle son
    I'm glad that you dropped in
    she reminds me of the one I loved back then

    So I handed him my keys and said here take her for a spin
    the old man scratched his head, and then he looked at me and grinned
    He said son, you just don't understand
    it ain't the car I want
    It's the brunette in your Vette that turns me on

    Repeat Chorus

    She reminds me of the one I loved back then ​
     
  8. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

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    Jim Keenan has nailed it.

    I've heard the phrase "hotter than a two-dollar pistol on Saturday night" a time or two.
     
  9. JoeHatley

    JoeHatley Member

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    Stolen gun..

    Joe
     
  10. Hardtarget

    Hardtarget Member

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    ...and a gentleman would respond to Ms West..." Ma'am, thats a Smith and Wesson, not a stiffened johnson"
    hotter than a two dollar on Saturday night...shots fired into the air in celebration of...whatever. If you shoot enough they all get hot.
    Mark.
    ...I used the Mae West response at the office Christmas party last year. She grinned like she understood...but I'm not sure she knows who Mae West is.
     
  11. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Ms. West had another claim to fame. During WWII, the inflatable life vest used by Navy fliers was almost universally known as the "Mae West". Since it was distinguished by two large inflatable bags at the front, I don't think there is any doubt where the inspiration for the nickname came from.

    Jim
     
  12. GunGoBoom

    GunGoBoom member

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    That's what *I* thought it meant. Getting physically hot to touch, due to being thin/cheap metal. Not its status as being stolen. Certainly not having to do with cheap guns shooting hotter loads, because if anything they must shoot lighter loads, to not kill their user.
     
  13. 1911 guy

    1911 guy Member

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    Meaning of "hot".

    In this context, I'm fairly certain the word is being used to mean stolen. The slang has been around for a long time, "hot" merchandise. A pistol going for two dollars when that song was written would certainly be stolen and fenced for quick cash.
     
  14. dfaugh

    dfaugh Member

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    Well...

    I've always used it to indicate something very hot to the touch....Have used the expression for years, bit have no idea where I first heard it.
     
  15. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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    Around home the expression was "Hot as a two- dollar pistol on the Fourth of July." In deepest Dixie the holiday is in the hottest part of the year, and is usually celebrated with lots of noise. In days gone by that included celestial salutes from whatever firearms were handy.

    To me it has always meant hot as in heat, not stolen...

    Reference to _Brewers Dictionary of Phrase and Fable_, the 1898 edition of which is online at Bartleby.com, provided no illumination re. this particular phrase. Checking the library for a newer edition might provide some insight as to the origin of the phrase.

    lpl/nc
     
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