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How do you charge cases?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by ohihunter2014, Nov 1, 2018.

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  1. Shimitup

    Shimitup Member

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    That's how I started and still do, old habits die hard.
     
  2. Robert101

    Robert101 Member

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    When using my RCBS single stage Rock Chucker I too use a loading block. Simply rotate the block around to get to all the cases. No problem. Since I've been loading on my Dilion 550B there is no need for a separate powder fill as a station in the progressive press does that for you automatically. I waited way too many years to get my progressive on.
     
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  3. George P

    George P Member

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    I used a single stage (and still do) for over 35 years. Had a Dillon for a year or so about 15 years ago, and finally went back and got a LnL for pistol.
     
  4. Dwb1957

    Dwb1957 Member

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    I made and adjustable bar so I can slide it in and out to work with any loading generally I just slide it out enough to just charge the frist thirty of a fifty round loading block. image.jpeg
     
  5. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    I have both of these in the garage somewhere

    31-5MVAVvWL._SX466_.jpg

    p_749004511_1.jpg

    I was originally taught to bring a tray of empty cases to the measure and charge each of the cases, then glance into the cases to insure uniform powder level.

    Sure you can. Just pick cases in the block, at random, to check the charge
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018
  6. PWC

    PWC Member

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    I don't worry about speeding up. Safety is more important to me.

    I use a loading block for prepared, primed cases on the left of the press. One case at a time, drop powder charge, seat bullet, move the completed cartridge to another loading block. Repeat.

    A charged case does not leave my hand until the bullet is seated. It is too easy to get distracted (wife calls, phone, company, grsnd kids....). Where did you leave off in the block? Too easy to get a double charge. I know you can look in each case to see, but why? You just lost whatever speed advantage you had. I can check weigh at any interval I choose.

    In 30 yrs, I've never had a squib load or fail to fire except for 2 bad primers. I enjoy my time at the loading bench, so 'hurry' isn't in my loading procedure.

    Fotgot to say I use a single stage press, first and only one I've ever had.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2018
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  7. Dudedog
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    Dudedog Contributing Member

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    I hear the wife's Visa works well but is dangerous:)
     
  8. Kp321

    Kp321 Member

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    Before I bought my first Dillon, I used a RCBS Little Dandy powder measure for pistol loads. It is small enough to hold and move from case to case in the loading block. Much more convenient than moving the loading block under the mounted measure and no chance of dropping the entire block of cases (don't ask).
     
  9. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    Lee #90597
    90868.jpg
     
  10. Toprudder

    Toprudder Member

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    Bringing the block to the measure is the fastest way, but usually when I am dumping powder for rifle, I am using my Chargemaster. The Chargemaster is the bottleneck. I only use one loading block, but start out with all the brass primed and neck down. This lets me see that all the primers are in the case. (Please don't ask why I do it that way ;) ). I take one case out, wait for the Chargemaster, verify it dumped the right amount (occasionally it goes 0.1 over), then take the pan out and use a funnel to dump it into the case, put the pan back on the Chargemaster and let it start weighing the next charge. While that is happening, I place the case back in the tray and get another case. Since all the cases are either neck-down and empty, or neck up and full, there is no chance of a double charge.
     
  11. JimKirk

    JimKirk Member

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    31-5-MVAVv-WL-SX466.jpg




    This RCBS stand is what I modeled my powder stand after .....notice that it also has the slot for the micrometer stem to pass through the stand ....

    IMG-20181102-163326190.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018
  12. rjbmjb
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    rjbmjb Contributing Member

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    I charge pistol cases on my LnL AP, and use a powder check die to detect over/under charges. For rifle, I use my Lyman dispenser and charge one case at a time and seat the bullet before going to the next. That way, if I get interrupted, I don't have to worry about skipping a case or double charging. With my turret press, I can flare (if necessary) and seat the bullet while I am waiting for the dispenser to meter the next charge.
     
  13. George P

    George P Member

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    I do that for rifle rounds; I weigh each charge and trickle; but since I shoot so little rifle any more, that isn't an issue. If I went that route for 38, 9mm or even shotshell; I'd quit reloading and just buy factory......:cool::thumbup:
     
  14. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

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    When I first started hand loading in the 70's I used the mounting bar that put the dispenser under the die on the press. This way as I charged the case it went straight into the press to seat the bullet, or weight check then to press. I still do it the same general way but I use a RCBS 1500 Powder Dispenser to dispense the powder, then to the press for seating the bullet. For handgun rounds, I use the LNL-AP auto powder dump with a powder cop die and never touch a round from start to finish. I only use ball powders in the LNL-AP, all extruded powders are dispensed via the RCBS 1500.
     
  15. Skgreen

    Skgreen Member

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    It's interesting to hear more about individual/block charging.
    Did some block charging myself when I first started a year or 2 ago. Never have charged an individual case '1 at a time',,,
    As mentioned earlier, block charging is no longer a part of my routine.

    Also interesting to understand the different amounts of time folks are willing to expend to pursue the hobby of reloading.
    Some have a lot of time. Others don't.
    At this point in my life, 'dropping singles' and/or using a single stage press would seem very restrictive and painstakingly slow.
    (Reloading the 250 rifle and 600 pistol rounds I shot last weekend would have taken quite a bit of time,,, Far longer than it took to shoot 'em,,)

    I also realize there may come a time when 'breaking out the single stage' and doing things 'that way' may seem attractive,,,

    I've always been intrigued with machines, and a desire to know exactly 'how they work',,, (Farm-boy who constantly got in trouble for taking things apart that didn't need fixing!!! LOL!!!)

    A progressive 'scratches that same itch' and saves me a lot of time. 'Works for me' is how I'd put it.

    Likewise, if someone has a certain way they like to do things, and it 'Works for them', then by all means, carry on!

    Either way, there is always something to see or learn in this hobby,,,, Glad to be able to experience it!
     
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  16. Bartojc

    Bartojc Member

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    For pistol and .223 FMJ (plinkers) I load on my Lee Turret.

    For all other bottleneck rifle I measure one at a time on the scale and the dump to the case one at a time.

    -Jeff
     
  17. bullseye308

    bullseye308 Member

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    Most of my time loading is on a Lee Reloader press. I usually have an ammo can or 2 of prepped brass waiting to be loaded so I just stand up a few hundred in front of the Hornady LnL electronic powder measure. Drop a handful of bullets on the bench and at the beep, pour powder in a case, grab a bullet, seat bullet, and drop in an ammo can. I could use the Loadmaster, but I have plenty of time
     
  18. otisrush

    otisrush Member

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    It never occurred to me to bring a block full of cases to the measure. And I don't think I could do it....for a number of reasons.

    I have my ready-to-load cases in a small plastic tub. (They're not standing up or anything. Just thrown in there in a bunch.) So I pick up a case, look inside to ensure it's empty, charge it, then put it in the loading block. I want a very clear and very deliberate change from "uncharged" to "charged". (I also once had an errant piece of corncob media get stuck in a bottleneck case and I almost charged it that way....so I developed the habit of looking in the case right before charging.)

    I am one of those fortunate ones where I have the time to load and I get pleasure out of using that time. I know what the craziness of life is like when in the throes of working, raising kids, etc. So I'm not saying charging-in-the-block shouldn't be done. But between my availability of time and tendency to over-worry about stuff I couldn't do it.
     
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  19. Catpop

    Catpop Member

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    You made that Jim? Very nice looking machine work!!!!!
     
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  20. Catpop

    Catpop Member

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    61FBC6D3-5D4C-47B3-9E82-C19DB801F9A1.jpeg
    Ah stop signs! You wouldn’t believe what I built out of stop sights!
    Above is an uw welding helmet (minus lens) I made for a job 3-4 years ago! Bless that DOT!
     
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  21. kidneyboy

    kidneyboy Member

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    I size and prime then use this assembly line. Sized and primed cases in the blue bin on the left. Powder drop next and then onto the LCT to finish. This allows me to recheck primers, check powder drop every 10 or so, look at the powder in the case twice.
    IMG_3344.JPG
     
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  22. George P

    George P Member

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    That Inline Fabrication stuff is really good, isn't it? I have some of their stuff too and it is really well-made
     
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  23. tightgroup tiger

    tightgroup tiger Member

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    I'm glad you told us what that was. I was starting to think it was a mask off of the Devil's Rejects.

    For something down, dirty, and quick I used two by fours for loading blocks when I was poor.
    loading blocks.jpg

    I still use these blocks today for all my hand loading, I pick the cases up one at a time and fill them with the powder from my AutoCharge powder dispenser. I used to use a RCBS Uniflow on a stand but it was never accurate enough for me so I moved on to the electronic powder dispenser.
    Doesn't matter what type of powder I run through it.

    The Uniflow doesn't get much use anymore, I don't know why I leave it on loading bench.
    uni-flow and Auto Charge.jpg

    That uni-flow is from the 80s and stand is from the 90s. The uni-flow and the rockchucker are the same age.

    I used to sit at the kitchen table with an old Redding #1 beam scale and a homemade trickler, that uni-flow was infinitely faster and the electronic powder measure runs as fast as I can seat bullets and inspect, one at a time of course.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2018
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  24. Ole Joe Clark

    Ole Joe Clark Member

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    I have been charging shells in the loading block for years, didn't know it was such a novel idea. I don't use this method with my LCT unless I am single staging.

    I just drop powder in a lot of 50 hulls in a block, weigh one or 2 from each row and then look in each one using a flash light. Nothing to it.

    Have a blessed day,

    Leon
     
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  25. George P

    George P Member

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    As is my Uniflow and stand; both still doing the job perfectly.
     
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