Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

How do you go about making a custom stock?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by Rusty Luck, Aug 10, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Rembrandt

    Rembrandt Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2003
    Messages:
    3,368
    I'm no professional at this, have done a couple over the years. This one started as a blank of "Pakkawood".....same material used on knife handles, pistol grips, and cleaning rods. It's a resin impregnated laminate that is cured in a microwave. Density is nearly that of aluminum. The blank ran over $400 twenty years ago....no idea what it would cost today. Since my background is auto restorations, many of the tools of the trade were applied. Finish is a catalyzed clear automotive polyurethane. If I were to do it again, in-letting would be done on a mill for sure.

    10-22f.gif
    Stock2.gif
    Stock1.gif
    VoquartsenSniper.gif
    Pakka3.gif
     
  2. hey_poolboy

    hey_poolboy Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    Messages:
    316
    Location:
    Central Ill.
    Wow! That's beautiful.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2
     
  3. Rusty Luck

    Rusty Luck Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2011
    Messages:
    349
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Wow! That's amazing!! Beautiful work.
     
  4. Zeke/PA

    Zeke/PA Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,299
    Location:
    Southeastern Pa.
    O.K. , I'll admit defeat!
    Lot's of info available on line and if one is talented enough to use it so be it.
    Some real nice " shooting" rifles have shown and if the "Stockmaker" is satisfied and he has a good shooting rifle, who am I to criticize?
     
  5. Jasonmackuk

    Jasonmackuk Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2012
    Messages:
    55
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    finished

    Took about 30 plus hours to convert a logun air rifle stock into a Ruger 1022 stock
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Jasonmackuk

    Jasonmackuk Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2012
    Messages:
    55
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    this is how it started

    The start 1 sec
     
  7. Jasonmackuk

    Jasonmackuk Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2012
    Messages:
    55
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    the pics

    The pics are earler in the post . i said 30 hours to covert the stock but after thinking it was more like 50 hours over 3 weeks
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2013
  8. Khornet

    Khornet Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    1,861
    Location:
    NH
    Stocking a rifle

    I'm a doctor, with few woodworking skills. For my Winchester 52B which I bought used with a butchered stock but great metal, I bought a rough blank from Wenig custom stocks. Just the rough outline of the stock, no inletting, a slab of walnut. Using Jerow's inletting black and sharp chisels and scrapers (scrapers are maybe your most important stocking tool), little by little I let the action into the wood. Of course to do this I had to rout out the barrel groove partially, then inlet the action some, then deepen the groove etc. Then using rasps, very little chisel work, SCRAPERS, and a spokeshave I shaped the contours of the stock. Inlet the sling swivel bases. Next I drilled holes for the action screw and the swivel bases. I drilled the holes oversize, filled them with Acraglas, seated everything and then inserted the screws and positioned them so the slots all line up with the long axis of the stock, called 'timing' the screws. Now when they're tightened home they all line up. Glass bedded the action in such a way as to have the screws timed there too. Made a buttplate from a piece of ebony scrap I got from a violin maker. Mounted that and timed the screws. Then I took everything off and did a rubbed oil finish using Pilkington's oil finish. I know how to checker, but my daughter stopped me from checkering this one saying it looked fine as-is.

    About six months' work altogether, taking my time. You don't have to be a pro, just read a lot and take your time. If I were doing this for a living it would be a very different matter.

    Brownells has a set of great book called "Gunsmith Kinks" full of very helpful tips. Monty Kennedy's "Checkering and Carving of Gunstocks" is invaluable. Pilkington finishes come with great instructions for getting a professional oil finish. In both books as well as in some comments above, you will note how many guys make some of their own tools. I wound up doing that too. I say give it a shot!
     
  9. Khornet

    Khornet Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    1,861
    Location:
    NH
    Model 52B restock

    A few pics of the result.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Khornet

    Khornet Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    1,861
    Location:
    NH
    That stock

    is left-handed on a standard right-handed action. The finish is IN the wood as well as on it. All the pores are filled by 'sanding in'. 6 or 7 years of squirrel hunting and target shooting and the finish is holding up fine.
     
  11. Rusty Luck

    Rusty Luck Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2011
    Messages:
    349
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Very nice work! Why left hand stock and right hand action?
     
  12. Khornet

    Khornet Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    1,861
    Location:
    NH
    Model 52B restock

    Because there are no left-handed Model 52s and I'm a lefty. Once, just once, I wanted to see how it feels to have a cheekpiece and palm swell on my side of the stock.
     
  13. 788Ham

    788Ham Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2010
    Messages:
    3,206
    Location:
    Hills west of Denver
    Doc,

    You've done yourself, and everyone else a favor for sharing this with us, you've done a beautiful job on that rifle. The "timing" of the screws I'd read about probably 30 years ago, had forgotten about it until your mentioning. Beautiful rifle, very nice rifle to hunt with also.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page