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How long do you expect guns, scopes, etc. to last?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by LoonWulf, Oct 19, 2020.

  1. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

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    So one of those questions that pops into my head from time to time, is simply how long does the average shooter EXPECT their equipment to last(before major repair, or replacement)?

    I dont expect anything to last forever, and while I dont intentionally damage my stuff, im rough on it. So my expected life span of an item is usually dependent on how much I spent, and how much use Ive gotten out of it.
    A example would be my little taurus 692. Ive already put something like 200 full power .357s magnums (this number will go up as I just got set up to load .357 again), and 400-600 9mms thru the thing in about two weeks of official owner ship. If that continues I wouldnt be horribly upset it its shot loose in a couple years.
    Like wise, Ive put about 200k miles on my truck, and if it decided to not start tomorrow (i would probably just fix it) id consider the 3500+maintenance and minor repairs, I spent on it well worth it....If id spent 35K(+ the regular maintenance) id be a little miffed.

    Thats just me, so I was curious what other folks think, and how they judge an items expected life span.
     
  2. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    I suspect my Desert Eagle to wear out before any others. Just the whole high performance aspect of it. It has about 2500 rounds through it now, in two years. I have broken a gas piston already and I hear the recoil spring assembly is only good for 3k, though mine seems fine.
    I probably don’t have that many rounds through my PT-92.

    But I see it being rebuilt several times before the main parts are too worn. I’m not sure how many they are usually good for, but I know if I do wear it out beyond repair, I will order another one that evening! I love mine that much!
    Even full-tilt 50A.E. I expect another ten thousand rounds. If I couldn’t do that I would be sad as they are not cheap.
    Hmm, maybe I should order another now, just in case, they aren’t getting less expensive...;)

    But then, 20,000 isn’t very many for a 1911, and a Glock would just be broken in. An AR may need a barrel and an extractor spring, but it will still run.
    I really don’t expect to wear out my rimfire rifles in my lifetime, a Savage is built to last!
    And I never would have thought I would have to worry about getting parts for my 597. Of course, that will be the first to get worn out then.

    That’s kinda what I expect, but have no way to be sure about. I haven’t worn any out yet.:)
     
  3. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    That's a hard one, so many variables.guess brake down the price per year or shot, just a lot of ways to think how long things should last.
     
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  4. Mr. Zorg

    Mr. Zorg Member

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    Well beyond my remaining lifespan, and at least 3 generations after myself for firearms. My WWI P08's & C96's show no sign of crumbling to powder like a vampire exposed to sunlight thus far as one yardstick. No longer being in military service I honestly expect the metal portions to have indefinite life, grips are less robust but more easily replaced.

    Scopes, dunno but I have some Made in Japan Tasco scopes from the 1970's that are still going strong. Electronic stuff like illuminated reticles, maybe my remaining life span.
     
  5. BigBL87

    BigBL87 Member

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    Honestly, I expect most of my guns to last long enough for me to pass them down with only minor maintenance. That being said, they don't see as much use compared to the THR average I imagine so that does skew my expectations.
     
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  6. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    I suppose I expect the majority of my guns to last through several changes of ownership without any need for repair or replacement of any major parts. My three go-to guns, my Beretta Model 70S, Ruger Mk.II, and Browning Hi-Power are durable, solidly built, all steel guns and probably capable of going through many more years of reliable service with little more than routine maintenance.
     
  7. Elkins45

    Elkins45 Member

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    I expect I might have to replace the barrel on my 257 Weatherby, and maybe springs and extractors on the pistols I shoot a lot. Other than that I figure all my guns will outlast me.
     
  8. jar

    jar Member

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    I expect any of my guns or scopes to last at least my lifetime with only minor repair and maintenance.
     
  9. CDW4ME

    CDW4ME Member

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    I'd expect a Glock to last longer than a "less expensive" brand, not naming names. (same caliber disclaimer)
    I'd also expect tool steel small parts on a Dan Wesson to last longer than MIM parts in a more "economical" 1911. (same caliber disclaimer, again)
    Note that I did not say anything bad about MIM therefore there is no need to "enlighten" me about its glorious benefits. ;)

    Not included in above disclaimers of caliber, .... is assumed equal care, maintenance, and ammo power.
     
  10. mcb

    mcb Member

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    I am currently trying to wear out several different firearms and their accessories with varying levels of success. I like to use my guns and most are bought at tools/toys to be used, and enjoyed, and not as an investment or heirloom. That said I do expect most to last several years of hard use with various levels of replaceable parts changed as needed. In most cases the cost of ammo dwarfs even the cost of fully replacing most firearms let alone the cost of maintenance and replacement parts.
     
  11. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

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    I don’t have a large gun collection, so I do shoot each gun, no safe queens. I also buy only first line brands. That being said, I guess I don’t shoot as much as many here.

    So, I fully expect each gun to last my lifetime, problem is, no one to pass them down to. My son is happy with just a shotgun in his closet, and my daughter won’t have a gun in her house.

    My original Winchester ‘73 was made in 1889, so over 130 years old and still going strong. My newer guns with modern steel, well, I see no reason why they won’t last just as long with minimal care.

    Electronics probably have a finite life, but just pure glass scopes, if well made originally, should last quite a while if not placed on a bone crushing magnum, and I don’t have any guns like that.
     
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  12. magyars4

    magyars4 Member

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    I've got a pre WWII S&W revolver that as far as I know is all original.still works with every trigger pull.
    I expect most of my firearms to last 100 years at least..I might have to replace a spring here or there.
     
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  13. Bill Raby

    Bill Raby Member

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    There are plenty of guns out there that work just fine after 300 to 500 years.
     
  14. mcb

    mcb Member

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    I doubt this. Sure there are a few 300+ year old guns still around but very few are in any condition to be fired and due to their condition, age, and rarity most owners would not let you fire them. A 500 year old gun predates the flint lock as we know it today and the match lock was just coming into its own.
     
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  15. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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    It all depends on how much things actually get used. I think most things dont get "shot" as much as they might get "used", and carried around.

    And thats assuming they are actually even being used, as opposed to played with and enjoyed.

    Most people I know who are hunters, arent really shooters, and the wear on their guns is usually cosmetic on the outside, as oppsed to parts wear on the inside.

    I have or have had a few guns that are/were at least 100 years old, that looked like they had less use and rounds through them than guns I bought new a couple of years ago, and shoot regularly.

    I have a Glock thats been getting 3-500 rounds a week through it, every week, for over a decade now, and it took around 8 or 9 years before "something" broke (a couple of trigger springs), and a little over 10 years before something more serious went and I had to send it in.

    Ive had NIB guns that didnt work out of the box, and the majority of those, werent "cheap" guns either.

    I guess the only way to find out, is take MCB's advice, and try and wear them out and see. :)
     
  16. WisBorn

    WisBorn Member

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    I'm one of those people that feel everything has a life.
    With firearms it is a combination of: rounds fired, cleaning, maintenance, storage, moving parts, and build quality.
    Of course we also need to look at the type of ammo that is used.

    Shoot them they are tools and replace them when there life is done:thumbup:
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2020
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  17. AK Hunter

    AK Hunter Member

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    It would depend on how much it gets used.
    I have some guns that don't get out of the safe very often & I have some that go to the range every time I go.
    I bought a cheap blem AR upper that the gas port hole was drilled in the wrong spot for under $200. It was my plinker just for spending the long shooting time at the range. I put in a light trigger pull trigger & found it would bump fire. It wasn't long I noticed the patterns start to widen, then it started keyholing. Yep the barrel was shot out but I put about 3K to 4K worth of junk steel case rounds through it. I bought it for fun & that's what I got out of it.
     
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  18. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

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    I expect to outlast only a few of my guns.

    My Phoenix hp22 is a great gun, but the slide rails were already in bad shape after 12000 or so. I polished them up and removed galling but they were showing signs of the wear continuing after another 8000 or so. After the last time I polished the slide rails there are sharp spots that I suspect will go quickly and I haven’t shot the gun much. It supposedly is warrantied, but I doubt that I would send it in. It was my first handgun and I have worked on it quite a bit. I think I would prefer to retire it and just buy another one to wear out. My shooting has slowed down a lot though. It was not unusual for me to burn a couple thousand 22s a month between my guns when I was single (and had nobody to check or limit the ammo budget). I suspect if I bought a replacement gun today then it would outlast me.

    Some of my antiques are barely in shootable condition. I shoot them though, and won’t have one if I feel it’s dangerous. That may change because I enjoy just looking at them now. My 32 safety hammerless (1910) has a soft sear and it will wear until it needs replaced. It may get retired then. My 38 safety hammerless (1898) has a problem with breaking cylinder stops. I think I fixed it with my last attempt, but I’m frustrated with it. If it breaks again it’s retired. My baby Russian (1878-1880) is a bit loose. It’s got some life left but not much before the latch is too loose to be safe, so I shoot VERY reduced loads in it to preserve it. I don’t honestly think I will ever get my Colt New Line working right. It was too far gone when I got it.

    Everything else can be repaired easily enough. The parts are scarce on the antiques, and a frame is kinda the gun itself so I wouldn’t call frame replacement a fix, sooo... that’s pretty much it.
     
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  19. theotherwaldo

    theotherwaldo Member

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    The greatest hazards to my guns aren't time, wear and tear... .
     
  20. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    I grew up using the guns my great grandfather bought new. Economy brands for the day too like Stevens and the various hardware store branded guns we are all familiar with. Nothing fancy or high end.

    I have high expectations for Guns. That’s why things like Ruger’s customer service make me snigger.

    Scopes I don’t think too much about. They should last longer than my lifetime the way I use them.

    If someone is shooting three gun every week I would definitely have different expectations. I don’t. So I don’t know how to gauge that level of use.
     
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  21. marksman13

    marksman13 Member

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    Depends on the gun, honestly. I expect my Ruger No. 1s to outlive my grandkids. They are well made with quality materials, and have few moving parts. I’d figure the same lifespan out of my bolt action rifles, revolvers and most of my semi-auto pistols. ARs are a little more complex and I expect some parts breakage here and there, but overall, I’d expect all of my guns to be more than serviceable for a few generations.
     
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  22. mmb617

    mmb617 Member

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    At my age I certainly expect my guns and scopes to last long enough to be passed on to my son.
     
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  23. Tommygunn

    Tommygunn Member

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    About 25 years ago after I'd gotten a good start in blackpowder, a friend showed me a family heirloom; a Colt 1860 Army revolver in .44 caliber. It lacked maybe 2/3rds of the bluing and while obviously well used, I could have loaded it and safely fired it had the friend permitted it. He'd never fired it himself; only his father had maybe about 1960.
    That was 1860s metallurgy. Today's guns are 2020 metallurgy. Much tougher.
     
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  24. Tommygunn

    Tommygunn Member

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    The greatest hazard to guns are POLITICIANS!!! :cuss::evil:
     
  25. wiscoaster

    wiscoaster Member

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    Oh, boy, when I read this thread's topic title on the forum list, the first thought that popped into my mind was: "how long will guns last before every dealer is out of stock of everything?" I guess that comes from having spent late last night before bedtime searching the web for who might have a particular rifle I'm looking for in stock. So, to respond to the actual question posed by the OP: they'll last a whole lot longer than you will. I have some guns (both rifles and pistols) that are over 100 years old and still work just fine.
     
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