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How mant thousandth's does one turn of the die equal?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Fatelvis, Dec 8, 2012.

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  1. Fatelvis

    Fatelvis Member

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    I remember reading somebody smarter than me dictating "1/4 turn of a 7/8X14 die equals .00X" die movement" and such, but I cannot seem to find it. Can anyone refresh my memory? Thanks-
     
  2. jcwit

    jcwit Member

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    Using math divide 1,000 by 14 the number of threads per inch. However because of tolerances in both threads it will vary.
     
  3. rikman

    rikman Member

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    I was taught divide 1 inch my 14 threads per inch.

    so one turn equals= .0714"
    1/4 turn = .0178"

    That's why I went to mostly all competition seaters.
     
  4. jcwit

    jcwit Member

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    Same thing, there are 1,000 thousands in 1 inch.
     
  5. Fatelvis

    Fatelvis Member

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    Wow, that was easy! Thanks!
     
  6. medalguy

    medalguy Member

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    When I'm setting up dies, I use a rule of thumb of 1 turn equals 60 thousandths, a quarter turn gives me 15 thousandths, then I start doing fine adjustments and use a micrometer.
     
  7. Fatelvis

    Fatelvis Member

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    Ok, so #3 is mathmatically correct, but I suppose the "slop" in the threads probably account for the variance from your figures and his?
     
  8. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    If you only partially loosen the die lock ring enough to allow turning the die body?

    There is no "slop" in the threads.

    1" = 1.000".
    14 TPI = threads per inch.

    1000 / 14 = .0714" per full turn.
    1/8 turn = about .009".

    It is nearly as accurate as a micrometer die unless you loosen the lock ring completely and let the die threads slop around in the press threads.

    rc
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2012
  9. gspn

    gspn Member

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    Hey...there's not supposed to be any math on this site. :cuss:
     
  10. 1SOW

    1SOW Member

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    .0714 / 360 degs = inches per degree of rotation = (approx.).0002"

    10 degrees of rotation would be (approx.)= .002"

    SOOooo if you printed a stick-on circle with 36 equally spaced dots.
    ANY Mark on the die could be used to change the die .002" accurately.
    HALF a dot would yield .001" increments.
    FIVE DOTS would= .010"

    If I didn't screw up the arithmetic, this is workable and really kinda cool.
     
  11. WNTFW

    WNTFW Member

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    A dial indicator works too. You just need a consistent base and a place to measure on the die. Same goes for dial caliper.
     
  12. Captaingyro

    Captaingyro Member

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    Although previous posters have given you the exact answer (71.4 thousandths per turn) I've always found it easier to remember 72. An added bonus is that 72 is divisible by just about everything (2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 12) so you can usually get within a couple thousandths of the adjustment you need to make.
     
  13. jcwit

    jcwit Member

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    Captain, never thought of that, excellant info!
     
  14. ranger335v

    ranger335v Member

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    Seater plug threads are MUCH finer than the 1-14 of the die body, surely no one tries to adjust bullet seating depth by screwing the body up and down. (Okay, nit pickers need not panic, I said seating, not crimping).

    Die body adjustment is all we have for adjusting sizing, especially for FL sizing to match the chamber. If it weren't so potentially harmful it would be laffable to see many posts 'wisely' telling new guys to make sizer adjustments in "small changes like 1/4 or 1/2 turn" until they get the cases sized right. Goodness, that changes the shoulders in steps from about 18 to nearly 36 thousants; given that most bottleneck cartridges only have a range of about 6 thou, min to max, for headspace, those 'small changes' are massive!
     
  15. Fatelvis

    Fatelvis Member

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    Setting up the sizer die was the reason I asked this question. It seems that with as important as head space is in reloading, there should be a more precise method of setting up your sizing die. I know Redding's comp shellholders are available, but I would like to see a infinitely adjustable sizing adjustment, kind of like the Redding/Forster competition seater setup. Is there such an animal out there?
     
  16. brickeyee

    brickeyee Member

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    Better think about that again.

    They may only be 13.9 threads per inch, or 14.1.

    ALL threads have pitch errors, let alone 'running' clearance between the male and female threads.


    Even the pitch of rifling shows variations over the length of all but the shortest barrels (and those are just get harder and harder to measure).
     
  17. Mike1234567

    Mike1234567 member

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    Please forgive my ignorance but is .7 percent error really enough error to worry about? If so then I'd better stay away from reloading.
     
  18. TexasShooter59

    TexasShooter59 Member

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    This is a great "thread"! :uhoh: :rolleyes:
     
  19. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

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    I really was thinking about this the other day only it was in relation to a bullet seating die knob. I have always just ball parked it until I got close.

    I guess some of the better dies have micrometer settings.

    We need MOD (Minute of Die) charts:)
     
  20. Bart B.

    Bart B. Member

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    Easiest thing to do is download the following, print it out actual size on sticky back paper, cut them out to size then stick 'em on your die lock rings.

    DieAdjustment.gif

    Here's the link:

    http://i860.photobucket.com/albums/ab170/jepp2/DieAdjustment.jpg

    You can also move the lock ring on the die about 1/10th inch in circumference for about .0025" of die height change; close enough for 98.7654% of reloaders. Most folks have about .002" spread across full length sized bottleneck cases for their headspace, anyway.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013
  21. Fatelvis

    Fatelvis Member

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    Wow, that is bad.... yet I laughed! Lol
    Thanks for the cutout Bart!
     
  22. James2

    James2 Member

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    Be that what it may, but lets not worry too much about it. I loaded for many years with no micrometer nor dial caliper. I started out using a factory load for an OAL comparison. Close enough if it works in the piece. My early data didn't give OAL, just powder and bullet weights.

    Why do you need to get critical with the adjustment of the dies? To full length size bump the die with the shell holder.

    To neck size only you need a little gap with the ram full up. If they chamber OK doing this fine, if not, turn the die in a little and try it again till they chamber good.

    You can worry yourself sick about "how many thou, this and that", but it is of not much use. Relax and adjust till it works. That is what matters.

    :)
     
  23. 1SOW

    1SOW Member

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    I made the center one---.002" per line for my seating die--- 36 evenly spaced lines.
    it works as advertised.
    This was my initial draft, later refined, printed on photo paper and placed on the lock nut for the die.

    Die%2520Adjustment%2520%252010%2520degs-002.jpg
     
  24. Fatelvis

    Fatelvis Member

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    I have to admit, I can reload without this knowledge, but I'm a bit of a tooling Geek! As I was slowly turning in the die to allow proper headspace, I was thinking it would be nice to have a micrometer adjustment for that purpose. I guess I suffer from a combo of being lazy and spoiled! Lol
     
  25. bergmen

    bergmen Member.

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    1.000/14 = 0.0714...

    1000/14 = 71.428...

    Dan
     
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