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How many load books is too many?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by douglas_knott, Oct 15, 2019.

  1. berettaprofessor

    berettaprofessor Member

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    Online is fine...I have only a few books unless you start counting the Hodgdon's annual (which I do). Those annual's start to take up space after awhile but I can't dump them because of the great articles in each one.
     
  2. Ironicaintit

    Ironicaintit Member

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    My oldest is the "Complete Guide to Handloading" by Philip B Sharpe, circa 1953.

    Just one more....
     
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  3. bfox

    bfox Member

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    . How has the data changed over the years for the same loads ?
     
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  4. Ironicaintit

    Ironicaintit Member

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    I think there's definite value to the online resources. So much data....

    But, have you ever found yourself looking for a load at 3am during a blizzard, loading by the light of a coleman lantern cuz the power's out?
     
    Demi-human likes this.
  5. horsemen61

    horsemen61 Member

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    The limit does not exist
     
  6. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    I have a bunch of manuals and the free loading manuals they give away at the stores.
    I occasionally buy used manuals on ebay.
    I keep all mine on book shelves for easy acess. When i have spare time I like looking through the new to me manuals.
     
  7. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    I keep all the old loading manuals that I have acquired over the years. Sometimes information is not available in the newer manuals that is available in older manuals.

    But, as Hondo60 has said, you have to be careful working up loads with old data as powders do change a bit over time as manufacturers improve their products.

    Besides, the old manuals have some interesting history associated with powders and cartridges.
     
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  8. 35 Whelen

    35 Whelen Member

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    Unless you're a new handloader needing to learn the steps, there's not much need to purchase loading manuals IMHO-

    www.loaddata.com

    Search/print only the calibers/powders/bullets you want.

    35W
     
    JeeperCreeper likes this.
  9. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    This link was posted recently:

    http://marvinstuart.com/firearm/Manuals/Reloading/Reloading Manuals/

    and I want to thank the individual who posted it, and Marvin Stuart. I was able to down load a number of manuals I tossed out, particularly the Hornday manuals, because I did not have room, and much of the data was obsolete.

    I don't know when manuals started pressure testing, but my 41st Lyman, and the 1967 Lyman that Marvin posts, do not have pressure tested data.

    GpBUEvu.jpg

    My Speer #5 is not pressure tested either. And about half of the powders in my Speer #5 are off the market. HiVel #2 loads people? Really?! Norma powders were heavily promoted in the 60's, lasted in data books till the 80's, but they are gone from the market. I only keep my Ackley reloading handbooks for the giggles and laughs, and as a reference for discussions with Ackley fans. I would never use his data, I have read too many comments about reloaders using Ackley data and priming their rifle cases afterward, with shot gun primers!
     
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  10. hdwhit

    hdwhit Member

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    When you own them all and you've started buying duplicates, it's time to stop.

    Seriously, I have a couple dozen manuals, but I pretty much rely on my Hornaday Handbook #9 (along with a Hercules pamphlet from the 1980's that has loads no longer published).
     
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  11. gudaki

    gudaki Member

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    I personally don't think I'll ever have too many load books.
     
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  12. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    The thirst for knowledge is unquenchable. The breadth of my curiosity unfathomable. The education is unending...

    But the dimensions of my closet are finite!:D
     
  13. brassbullets12

    brassbullets12 Member

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    Never enough! , I have some back to 50's, and new ones too! I have found some at flea markets for a couple of bucks
     
  14. Jesse Heywood

    Jesse Heywood Member

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    How many storage units does your friend have rented?
     
  15. Archie

    Archie Member

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    I'm of the 'more is better' opinion. I have a bunch of load books from the past, including Phil Sharpe's book.

    But, I use only about five or six regularly. I try to keep up with recently printed information. I tend to stay away from the one cartridge specific books, as they are generally simply an anthology of already printed information and likely dated at that. (Current powders lag behind and some older questionable pressure testing methods.)

    I keep older loading manuals but in a different section of my 'library'. A great overlooked (far too often) resource in loading books is the explanatory section before the load data. There is good information on the 'evolution' of bullets, powders, primers and concepts behind loading procedures.

    BFox asked "How has the data changed over the years for the same loads ?"

    Yes. Powder changes in burning rate over time, new powders are developed and the pressure testing methods have changed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2019
    Slamfire likes this.
  16. BCR#1

    BCR#1 Member

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    I have one, second edition Lee. If I need more information, I'll look online. I'd rather spend money on components than books.

    Bill
     
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  17. Erief0g
    • Contributing Member

    Erief0g Contributing Member

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    Once you realize you don't need any more bullets ever again
     
  18. kcofohio
    • Contributing Member

    kcofohio Contributing Member

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    I prefer print over online data. They both have their place though. And both are good tools.
     
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  19. Jack B.

    Jack B. Member

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    I mostly try to use manuals or on line info that have data for the components that I use and have on hand.
     
  20. mdi

    mdi Member

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    Online data is fine, although I'm not fond of Alliant's format. Call me a dinosaur if you will but I have quite often had 2 or 3 manuals open to a certain cartridge comparing data. With on line data I would have to print out the data to compare, no big deal just a bit more time consuming, and my computer and printer are in the house, my reloading is in the shop out back...

    There is way more to a reloading manual than load data...
     
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  21. lightman

    lightman Member

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    How many is too many? Its a personal choice but most of us have several. I like to look at a few different ones when I start loading for a new cartridge or change powders.
     
    1976B.L.Johns. likes this.
  22. Dudedog
    • Contributing Member

    Dudedog Contributing Member

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    Ah, when you run out of space to store them. (I don;t have that many)
    I'm single but I suppose to many could also be when SWMBO tells you no more.;)
     
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