Quantcast

How much are you willing to spend on a knockaround rifle?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by KsSkaEnthusiast, Jan 22, 2021.

  1. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Messages:
    16,835
    Location:
    Elbert County, CO
    Define "knockaround".

    I use a 700 BDL C/D with a $700 Leupold scope for most big game hunting. I try not to damage it, but it's a tool, so stuff happens, and I would rather scratch a more expensive rifle than not get the animal I'm after due to cheap equipment on a hunt that is, at minimum, costing me several days of work and another few hundred in fuel and supplies.

    Something to beat around in the truck for coyotes and the like? A $300 Mossberg Patriot with a $200 Vortex scope is what the doctor ordered.
     
  2. KsSkaEnthusiast

    KsSkaEnthusiast Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2020
    Messages:
    82
    To reference as knockaround I intended for a rifle that you are willing to beat up in a rather broad since so that it could encumber things such as truck guns, hunting rifles, varmint/pest rifles and all of the such. It is a personal sense to each one as to how much they'd spend on a rifle they would beat up. It just so happens that for myself and some others hunting rifles are what would classify as knockaround the most.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  3. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Sixgun Nut

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    19,902
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    Well, rifles that I hunt with have very different lives from those that spend all year riding in a vehicle. My hunting rifles don't get "beat up".
     
    .308 Norma and LoonWulf like this.
  4. DM~

    DM~ Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    Messages:
    3,086
    Location:
    upper mid west
    This is my around the house, "knock around gun", for a while now,

    standard.jpg

    standard.jpg

    BUT, on my S&S I have a Henry lever 22, it's held up perfectly, even though it's an original model with the dreaded plastic sights and plastic bbl. band! (actually nylon)

    BTW, the sights are still just fine, and I've knocked more than one crow out of a tree at over 100 yards with them. I couldn't even guess how many coons and possums I've eliminated with it! OR how many thousands of rounds I, and others have sent down the bbl..

    It still eats everything I feed it, mixed or otherwise, even though it hasn't got it's first cleaning yet but over the years I DID wipe it off a couple times! orig.gif

    I bought it because it was "cheep for the quality" to just leave it on my S&S to go to work with me every day, and it has proven to be a true statement!

    DM
     
  5. Mosin77

    Mosin77 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2019
    Messages:
    360
    Your post illustrates my previous point perfectly. I’d be happy to carry a fine custom flintlock afield. It might be expensive but there’s no shortage of custom makers and beautiful guns out there should the worst happen. And an ordinary ding would be “character,” imparted by me or my family or my friends, to my gun. I’m not sure, however, if I’d feel so free to carry an original from the 18th century. Maybe I’d shoot it on a beautiful day while handling it carefully and transporting it in a padded case, but risking a slip and fall and cracked original stock? I’d feel terrible.
     
  6. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    13,255
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Like others have said, I don't intentionality beat up my equipment, but its gonna get used.
    My most expensive rig is my Christensen Ridgeline and Zeiss Conquest HD5.
    Its got a bunch of nicks and dings, and scratches. I hunt on lava rock about 3/4 of the time. Cant hunt lava rock without some dings and dents, and its gonna go hunting or all that money I spent would be a waste.
     
    benEzra, BreechFace, adcoch1 and 7 others like this.
  7. z7

    z7 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2014
    Messages:
    1,131
    I am an anomaly of sorts, but I had a custom rifle out together and it doesn’t bother me thst it got scratched

    it has a polymer and aluminum chassis, cerakote over a stainless barrel and a vortex gen ii razor scope. It weighs 16lbs with the bipod and magazine

    I shoot it as often as I can, shoot local prs matches, but also deer hunt with it. Scratches don’t bother me. The barrel will get changed in a few years anyway

    what does bother me is rust, and I am very disciplined with Rust prevention

    my other guns get hard used (3 gun, duck hunting)

    I buy them to use them and take care of what matters, aesthetics don’t concern me
     
    benEzra and LoonWulf like this.
  8. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Messages:
    8,649
    Location:
    South Eastern Illinois
    I have knockabout rifles. They are truck/atv/tractor guns. Basically coyote guns, generally speaking.
    20201220_150226.jpg
    This .204 handi-rifle rode behind the air seat in my combine one fall. Little did I know that a bolt rubbed through the rifle case, and knawed into the wood on the forend. I had to take the belt sander to it to smooth it out.

    20190117_084825.jpg
    I bought this short little Ruger American Ranch in 7.62x39 because of its compact size and its ability to eat my supply of 7.62x39 ammo.

    20160124_154341.jpg IMG_0327.jpg

    For me, the king of knockabout rifles is the AR15. Im not particularly fond of them, but their ruggedness and firepower is undeniable.
     
  9. tubeshooter

    tubeshooter Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Messages:
    1,642

    I think this is a good point. Knockaround could mean an inexpensive general purpose kind of a rifle, or maybe it could mean a rifle that is semi-specialized and rather optional but by all means NOT a general purpose rifle as traditionally defined.

    If you collect long enough, you will probably get to a point that you have a number of the former and start concentrating on the latter.



    The more disposable income you have, the more $ you can throw at either type of purchase. Our situations are all different, so therefore anyone's exact dollar figure is meaningless outside of their own shooting budget.
     
  10. .308 Norma

    .308 Norma Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2016
    Messages:
    3,036
    Location:
    SE Idaho
    Exactly. In that thread called "Break Barrels" I posted a picture of the plain Jane NEF 32 HMR with a Weaver 4X that stands in a corner by the back door. We use it for pest control in our garden and currant bushes. That's what I call a "knockaround rifle." I don't even remember what I paid for it, but I'm sure it was less than $500, including the scope.
    On the other hand, I've said before that I paid for my custom built, Montana Rifle Company 308 Norma Magnum with my first two Social Security payments - better than $3,000. And by the time I got it slung and scoped (a 3X9 Weaver) I had part of a 3rd Social Security payment into it. Even though it's stainless and wears a synthetic stock, which might be ugly to some people, it's not a "knockaround rifle" to me. To me, it's the hunting rifle I'd dreamed of owning since I was 16 years old.:thumbup:
     
    adcoch1, DustyGmt, 3Crows and 4 others like this.
  11. stillquietvoice

    stillquietvoice Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2016
    Messages:
    1,800
    Location:
    Upstate ny
    I don't mind older used rifles, I've bought several that have honest wear, usually they have been carried afield L apt and shot little. Lots of life in them.
     
    chicharrones and LoonWulf like this.
  12. Bartojc

    Bartojc Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    Messages:
    912
    Location:
    Michigan
    I don’t look at it as a dollar amount necessarily. I don’t own a rifle that I paid over $600 for, but they may well be worth more that that now.

    I use a rifle for it’s intended purpose. For a knock around rifle I wouldn’t spend more than $600 for something I’m going to throw around in a Jeep or let ride behind a tractor or combine seat. That’s me though. I also would not hesitate to take a 1000 dollar rifle hunting in the mountains in a snow storm either.

    Jeff
     
  13. DustyGmt

    DustyGmt Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2016
    Messages:
    1,455
    Location:
    Green Mountains Vermont
    Sounds about right. You can get a really good, accurate, reliable rifle for $500 nowadays. I treat all my guns and knives the same pretty much. Sometimes the honeymoon phase lasts a lil longer with more expensive items but eventually all my stuff gets used and treated the same, pretty much. I wouldn't go out of my way to scratch and bugger up a gun whether it's $200 or $2000. I view guns as tools, keep em in good working order and they will last forever.
     
  14. adcoch1

    adcoch1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2015
    Messages:
    2,782
    Location:
    Centralia Washington
    500 or less, 200 if I'm lucky. But again, if it does the job best it goes with me, no matter what it costs. As @Armored farmer said, this is what the ar15 is for...
     
    stillquietvoice and LoonWulf like this.
  15. Rexster

    Rexster Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2007
    Messages:
    3,592
    Location:
    SE Texas
    I bought my recent AR15/M4 uppers and lowers separately, the brands being BCM, LMT, and Colt, so, I am willing to spend in the mid-teens to about $2000 on a hard-use rifle, for hunting people.

    The complete Colt AR15A2 Govt Carbine, that I bought in 2002, with PD letterhead, to use as a duty patrol rifle, cost between $800 and $900. (I later sold that one to a colleague with younger eyes.)

    I have treated my rifles better than my duty shotguns. My actual “knock-around” guns have been shotguns.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  16. StrawHat

    StrawHat Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Messages:
    4,329
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    My two hunting rifles are both custom built. The one by myself and the other was an upgrade by a local gunsmith.

    62988ABB-0D82-498E-990C-B91FE5CE8CD8.jpeg C9B5EF66-31C4-432E-B934-3E576C8931E8.jpeg

    The reason I built them was to use them. Same with the muzzle loaders or any of the firearms I own or have owned.


    Kevin
     
  17. magyars4

    magyars4 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    411
    Location:
    Indiana
    At today's prices. Or for what they were bought for originally?
    My top walk around rifle is my 1894 Winchester, pre safety in 45 Colt that I probably paid around 500 for way back when......I also have a Savage 24, 223/12 that's been modified and ceracoated (sp) as my canoe gun.... around 250 ages ago.
     
  18. Bfh_auto

    Bfh_auto Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2016
    Messages:
    4,270
    My knock arounds are a r-92 in 357 and an Anderson AR that I put together. The first is about 500 the other varies from 800 to 1000 depending on whether it's wearing NV or not.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  19. tarosean

    tarosean Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2010
    Messages:
    7,212
    Location:
    TX
    6 figure guns are made to "knockaround" in the bush. 6 figure shotguns are made to "knockaround" the field. As others stated, I do not intentionally beat my guns up. I am not using them as hammers or chopping wood with them or whatever your trying to convey. I use them and shoot them.
    Over the course of decades and decades hunting, I have slid down scree fields, slipped down arroyo's, fallen in streams and lakes. Crap happens, I am not going to cry about a scratch or 20 no matter the cost of the equipment.
     
  20. JCooperfan1911

    JCooperfan1911 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2020
    Messages:
    404
    I use a Soviet SKS carbine as a knockabout gun. Bought for under $100 a couple of decades ago. It is heavily worn from sliding around on camping trips etc. I wouldn’t use any gun with much value for that especially since it could get stolen being carried in a vehicle.
     
    BreechFace and LoonWulf like this.
  21. Thomasss

    Thomasss Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2020
    Messages:
    304
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    You would be surprised what can be found on the cheap and be really good firearms. Pump shotguns are now ignored like Stevens 520 (Browning design) for $200. How about a Pattern 17, Enfield chambered in 30.06, $150 or a Thompson Center .50 cal Hawkins for $100.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  22. StrawHat

    StrawHat Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Messages:
    4,329
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    The two rifles I show in post 41 are special.

    The Winchester Model 1895 came to me as a 30 US. It is now a 405 WCF with a 27” barrel. I have found that for cartridge rifles I prefer that length and get them when possible. The smith who did the work argued with me to cut it shorter. He lost.


    The black rifle has had an interesting life. It started as a Model 1861 musket. It was converted sometime between 1867 and 1869 to become a Model 1866 Springfield chambered in 50-70. After it was removed from service it was sold to Francis Bannerman and cut down to become a short rifle. It may have been sold overseas. When I got it, it was merely a barreled action. I had hoped to restore it using original parts. Too pricey for a newlywed! My best friend suggested a replica 1861, also pricey. Stopped into my favorite ML shop in Lodi Ohio. During the course of conversation and BS Dan says, “Take a look at this poor old thing” and handed me a replica 1841 Mississippi Rifle with a trashed barrel. While we were all lamenting how anyone could do that to a rifle, I was seeing my next project. It took a bit of bargaining but it came home with me. Eventually I was able to let the action and barrel into the stock and alter the hammer to make contact with the firing pin. After some years, I grew to dislike the new look so stripped the wood and using various stains got the color you see.

    All told, I like and use both.

    Kevin
     
    Rexster, Demi-human and LoonWulf like this.
  23. Legionnaire
    • Contributing Member

    Legionnaire Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    7,353
    Location:
    Texas
    @CraigC, that flintlock is gorgeous!

    Don't know that I have what y'all are referring to as a "knockabout" rifle. I have some "walkabout" rifles, but they are all in pretty good shape. Probably the least expensive rifles currently in the safe are the two Henry Single Shots in .357 and .44 magnum that I bought before the current price inflation.
     
  24. bigmike45

    bigmike45 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Messages:
    1,089
    Location:
    Texas
    The thing about it is you don’t have to settle for an older rifle if you don’t want to because almost all of the manufacturers offer a sub $500 centerfire rifle that will pretty much handle 90% of all hunting situations.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  25. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Sixgun Nut

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    19,902
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    To me, relatively cheap used levergun always seemed like the perfect knockabout/truck/ATV rifle.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice