Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

how much did reloading used to cost?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by hardheart, Nov 22, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. hardheart

    hardheart Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2004
    Messages:
    161
    Searching old threads online, I saw one that mentioned Academy was selling 9 for 3.86 a box back in 2005. I can't remember exactly what I was paying, since I had a long stretch of not shooting. If reloading cost what it does now back then, I would think only competitive shooters would have bothered. Have components and equipment risen as much, less, or more than factory ammo?
     
  2. medalguy

    medalguy Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    3,208
    Location:
    New Mexico
    No idea really but I would guess prices have risen about the same, percentage-wise. I don't know how you could compare the two.

    Forgot-- I was looking at a friend's stash of brass yesterday and he had a box of 20 .303 British Winchester factory ammo marked $3.97. I'm guessing it was 30 years old? Wish I could even reload it for that today.
     
  3. James2

    James2 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    878
    Location:
    Northern Utah
    Yes, components have risen in proportion to ammo over the years. I remember buying primers for $7.00 per 1000. Ya, guess that dates me. I started loading in 1957.
     
  4. Krogen

    Krogen Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2010
    Messages:
    302
    I got started in the mid 80's. I still have some powder that was $9.95 / lb and primers that were $10.95 / 1k. But, my paycheck was less in those days too. What really strikes me, though, is ammo prices. I think they've gone up faster than handloading components. It hasn't been over 10 years since Lake City 5.56 was ~ 16 cents per round. Now 40 cents is a good deal, with 45 or 50 cents not uncommon. That has led me to re-start handloading for 5.56 mm, 9mm and 45 ACP. In days past, it wasn't worth handloading; now it is.
     
  5. Cleftwynd

    Cleftwynd Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2011
    Messages:
    74
    I used to but 7mmSTW factory rolled for 40-50 per 20, now I see it as high as 140, and brass at 70 per 25 pack!
     
  6. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Messages:
    14,465
    Location:
    Elbert County, CO
    Powder hasn't jumped temendously. Brass & Bullets have gone up significantly. Primers are what really took a hike.

    If I were to hazard a guess, these are the approximate percentage increases over the last decade or so:

    Powder: +10%-20%
    Brass: +50%
    Bullets: +50-70%
    Primers: +200%-250%

    Reloading equipment: +10%-20%

    Now this would be for common stuff. A lot of the higher end or obscure components were always expensive, and have not changed much.
     
  7. angus6

    angus6 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    206
    Location:
    N.E.MO.
    looks like I was at around $1.30 to load them then and now at $2.00 a box as free w/w are pretty much gone
     
  8. highlander 5

    highlander 5 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    2,325
    Location:
    lynn,ma
    I started loading in the early 70s as 44 mag ammo was $5 a box of 20. I believe I got it down to around $2 a box of 20 and that was with the original Lee Loader.
     
  9. blarby

    blarby Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,144
    Location:
    Calapooia Oregon
    It was basically free.

    You apparently used to be able to chew primers back into shape, grind powder off the end of the stove, and pluck bullets off the trees.

    Any lead shot you needed could apparently be picked out of the toilet, thanks to the amount of lead floating around and through everyones body- and you could roll your own shotgun hulls out of dark shade grown Virginia tobacco.

    Happy thanksgiving.
     
  10. Magnum Shooter

    Magnum Shooter Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2012
    Messages:
    406
    Location:
    Just East Of Cleveland, OHIO
    I have a box of 100 Speer 158g JSP for 38 bought back in the early 80s, it’s priced at $ 5.49. Powder was about $12/lb and primers about $10/K back then.

    Most competitive shooters want/need the best performance from their guns and the only way to get that is to hand load, regardless of price.
     
  11. wv109323

    wv109323 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2009
    Messages:
    59
    Location:
    Lenore , WV
    I think where reloading has the biggest advantage is in "specialty" ammo. That would include ammo like Federal Gold Match and some of the game ammo loaded with partition or bonded bullets.
    Federal Gold Match runs like $36.00 per box of 50. You can reload a compatible load with a cast bullet for $6.50 to 7.00 for 50. Ammo with jacketed bullets would be about $12.00 per box of 50.
    The same thing applies with FGM in .308 Winchester.
    It is hard to buy new brass and load some of the more common calibers and even break even with promotional ammo. This would include 9mm, .38 Special and .223/5.56.
    Primers and Bullets have risen much faster than inflation . This is due to the recent wars, panic buying and the demand for raw materials such as copper and lead.
     
  12. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2009
    Messages:
    7,397
    Location:
    Central Arkansas
  13. rodinal220

    rodinal220 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,298
    Location:
    USA
    I remember being able to buy Win231/HP38 from HSM for $8 a lbs back in the early mid eighties. primers like $10 a thousand.It wasn't that long ago you could buy mil-surp 5.56 brass for $10-12 a thousand.Its insane now.Lead is both a precious and unwanted by some metal.
     
  14. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Messages:
    15,710
    Location:
    Hot and Humid FL
    I used to buy 5000 209 primers for 85.00; but then I also bought a case of Remington .22 (6250 rounds) for $95.00 at the same show
     
  15. VINTAGE-SLOTCARS

    VINTAGE-SLOTCARS Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    450
    Location:
    San Gabriel Valley
    Reloading cost

    I have a bottle of unique priced at $7.99 a pound, a tin 8 0z of Red Dot at $1.88 and CCI primers at .97 cents a hundred also early 80's. Cast bullets were done by a friend for $20 dollars per 1k lead cost included. I still have several thousand .45 acp, 45 long colt, 44 mag, 357 mag, 9mm, and .380 I used for a mac 11. My buddy always needed money and I bought what I thought was way too many bullets at that time.
     
  16. JLDickmon

    JLDickmon Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2012
    Messages:
    665
    Location:
    Comstock, MI
    Today, I broke open a brick of WLP primers I bought in the late '80's or early '90's.. sticker said $16.50
     
  17. CZ57

    CZ57 member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,533
    Location:
    Heart of Texas
    A lot less! The biggest price increases have been with bullets and primers. ;)
     
  18. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2008
    Messages:
    9,832
    Location:
    SW Arizona
    Wll, I started out with Shotshell loading back in the mid 1970's and at that time some shops would offer powder in sample size quantities, like 1/8 or 1/4 lb.baggies as I remember it. The standard 1 lb. container of Red Dot was like $6 or $7. chilled shot was probably around $8 per 25 lb. sack, AA wads were $2.50-ish per 250 ct. or mabe it was 500 ct., 209's were like $12- $13 per K, and hulls could be found in vast quantities for .03 each. That was back when Blue Magics could be found every where, I always thought those hulls were a tad better than AA's, and paper hulls were also widely available too. I might be low balling it though cause I think a box of 1-1/8 oz trap / skeet loads cost about $1.50 per box to load and that was using the more expensive AA wads.

    I started loading metalic like 1979 I think. Primers were easy to find @ $16 per K, powder was in the $8-$10 per lb. range, high end jacketed rifle bullets were $6-$8 per 100, and I don't remember what I was spending on brass. I know that on occasion when I couldn't find brass factory high powered rifle ammo for like .270 win, 30-06, and 7mm RM could be found for $8 per box for Rem, win, Federal, and the economy brands like PMC were about $6 per box. Ya, those were the days my friends and I sure do miss them.

    I bought my first RCBS "O" frame aluminum press for $60 from Longs Drug store in Flagstaff, Az.., it is an RS2 or Reloader Special 2. Bought a Rock Chucker for $20 also at a yard sale. Bought my RCBS 5-10 scale at a yard sale for $5 and it was in perfect condition and still in the original box. I remember the guy had a $10 price on it and I talked him down. Bought my first Mec 600 JR for $89 or less brand new. Then in the mid 1990's I bought my second 600 JR on sale at Cabela's for $189 if that sounds accurate.

    Bought my first several Rem. 700 ADL's for $180 or $190 from Kmart, Rem. Wingmaster 870 was only $225. or so, and the economy model 870 was $150 or $160 I think. Ya, things have deffinietly gone up a smidge you could say.

    GS
     
  19. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    7,239
    Location:
    East TN
    I kind of remember around 1980 being able to reload 38 Special cast wadcutters for a bit more than the cost of quality 22 long rifle.
     
  20. Sheldon

    Sheldon Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    Messages:
    764
    Location:
    La Puente, CA
    I would venture to guess you'de save about half of retail for your reloads versus buying factory ammo if you get components in bulk quantity.....at any given time. Ammo manufacterers make a profit over what they have invested in the combined components used to make their ammo and for the most part that is what the reloader saves in doing it himself.
     
  21. 340PD

    340PD Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2007
    Messages:
    1,359
    I just used up an old can of Green Dot from the 70's. $1.79/lb in grease pencil on the can. Most of my reloading costs were under $2.00/box for handgun calibers.
     
  22. cpt-t

    cpt-t Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2011
    Messages:
    570
    Location:
    South Central Kansas
    hardheart: I started reloading on my own in 1963. I bought a 218 BEE and a 50 round box of WIN 46gr HP`s for it were $4.25 a box. I bought 2 boxes a week to build my brass supply. At a Gun Show a few weeks ago I saw and old box of the same WIN 46gr HP`s for $90.00 plus. I was looking thru an old 1964 reloading manual and found a rececite, from Gunning Wholesale in Wichita Ks from for a 1lb can of 2400 powder for $2.69, and 2 boxes of 224 Dia 45gr Sierra bullets, They would have been a 100 bullet`s in a box for $4.28 for 2 boxes. and $00.21 taxs for a total of $7.18. Primmers Don`t quote on this but the figure .25 to .35 cents a packet of a 100, comes to my mind.
    ken
     
  23. RandyP

    RandyP Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2009
    Messages:
    1,275
    Location:
    Illinois
    Most everything costs more today than it did "X" years ago though the actual value of a dollar fluctuates across many different standards - while reading some of the ads from 60's might make a person drool over the great 'buys' to be had, in the context of the times and workers' wages, they were not really great deals, just normal prices. Inflation is a strange thing indeed. lol
     
  24. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Messages:
    14,465
    Location:
    Elbert County, CO
    Ammo has more than doubled in the last decade. Home prices, new cars and average wages have not gone up anywhere near that. It's not just normal inflation.
     
  25. hardheart

    hardheart Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2004
    Messages:
    161
    I use the rule of 72 for doubling prices. At 3% average inflation, prices from the mid eighties should be about doubled now. So I guess primers are about 50% higher than they would be if inflation was the only upward pressure on price.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page