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how much of a hassle are dippers and a trickler?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Soybomb, Apr 20, 2008.

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  1. Soybomb

    Soybomb Member

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    I'm wanting to finish my cheap reloading setup and it doesn't look like the lee autodisk is made to be bench mountable so I'm thinking about just using some dippers and a trickler. How much of a hassle is it to make some loads like this? Will the lee dipper set and a trickler allow me to get pretty much any load I like or will I be like 5 grains off from the dipper and have to work the trickler forever to get up to weight? :D

    If it matters the chrages will be weighed on a 10-10 which I hear might have a little less bounce to it.
     
  2. res45

    res45 Member

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    Thats pretty much what I use 99% of the time but I average about 100 rds. at a time loading. I have a RCBS Lil Dandy Rotors powder dumper I use on some pistol Rds. that really accurate if I'm just wanting to load some plinking ammo. I have an old Lyman beam scale I have used for 20 yrs. it's still producing quality accurate loads.
     
  3. The Bushmaster

    The Bushmaster Member

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    Dippers and a trickler with a scale will work just fine. In fact...It will be just as good as any of the powder dispensers. Just a bit slower...
     
  4. Grandpa Shooter

    Grandpa Shooter Member

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    If you know what the end weight is going to be it is simple to set yourself up to use a dipper and trickler. Find the dipper which comes to within .2-.3 of the desired end weight. If you are close enough you are good to go. If not, you can take up some of the volume in the dipper by putting just a little hot melt glue in the dipper. When it is close enough let it dry completely.

    Dip your charge into the pan on your scale and then trickle the remainder into the pan on your scale. If you trickle slow enough the scale won't bounce and it can be done very quickly.

    Use a loading block to hold your brass and only put them in as you charge the cases.

    Worked for me when I was getting started years ago.
     
  5. Mal H

    Mal H Administrator

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    If you're talking about the trickler that slowly dispenses powder as you turn the little handle, then you might want to hold off buying that. I've found that by using a small Lee dipper, I can trickle powder much faster than the device designed to do it. So a set of the dippers and your scale is about all you'll need.
     
  6. lgbloader

    lgbloader Member

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    A set of Lee dippers belongs on every bench, in my belief. I've used this method and it is a bit slow but very accurate. I like to switch things up and load in different methods depending on what kind of mood I am in and this is one of them. One day, I'll use one of my blue machines, another, I'll use my Classic cast or my Redding T7. Some days, I still load a few rounds of 38 spcl with my Lee Classic Loader and a hammer!
     
  7. Soybomb

    Soybomb Member

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    That was indeed what I was talking about. No problems overshooting just tapping a little out of the small dipper? I wouldn't mind saving $15 on a tricker and putting it toward more bullets if it really is easier to go without the trickler.
     
  8. ClarkEMyers

    ClarkEMyers Member

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    I started with a 310 tool and a scale. With practice almost anything will work for one load - I got pretty good coming up just shy of the load with a saucer and a spoon.

    Sure you can make it work.
     
  9. jhansman

    jhansman Member

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    I use Lee dippers (no trickler) exclusively for my handgun loads, but I always weigh the dip when I begin, just to see if there is any variance with the powder (humidity, that bottle's lot, etc.). When I am satisfied I have a consistent, safe dip, away I go. This is where Lee's powder through expander die really pays off, especially if you are using a single-stage press. For rifle, I weigh every charge, regardless. One day I hope to have an RCBS Chargemaster combo.
     
  10. lgbloader

    lgbloader Member

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    jhansman, the chargemaster is the way to go for rifle loads. I can set it and charge a case and seat a projectile while it dispenses another charge. I am so glad that I got this.
     
  11. Mal H

    Mal H Administrator

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    No problems that I have found. I have the technique pretty much down pat. I can see on the scale that 2 more grains (actual powder grains, not weight) are needed, so I can tap 2 more grains into the scale pan. With the dipper in hand, if you do happen to go over a little (a grain or two) it's as simple a matter to quickly scoop some out of the pan as it is to trickle it in.
     
  12. rickomatic

    rickomatic Member

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    If you're reloading for a MAS, should you use a French trickler? :neener:
     
  13. GP100man

    GP100man Member

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    as long as you have the 10-10 scale it don`t matter what you use to get the powder from storage to pan,i use a cut off case to throw some powder in the pan with a soldered on nail for a handle !!!!

    GP100man
     
  14. Soybomb

    Soybomb Member

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    :D I was hoping that a good scale would make it less annoying when I cheaped out on the powder dispensing system!

    Sounds like I'm ditching the trickler and maybe will get a die set for the .38 special instead :D
     
  15. Ol` Joe

    Ol` Joe Member

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    I use the Lee dippers for the times I load only a box (20 rd) of rifle ammo or am working up a new load in different charge increments. Just dipping a couple charges is faster then setting up the measure. I also "tap" the last couple tenths with a dipper instead of a trickler. The measure comes out when I put up a batch of 100 or more rounds.
     
  16. CU74

    CU74 Member

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    I use a Lee Pro Auto Disk Powder Measure for handgun calibers but I use dippers and an electronic scale when reloading .30-06 - the Auto Disk capacity is too small. I have a trickler, but have found I can just tap the dipper and get my load weight faster that way. Since I never load more than 100 rounds at a time, the extra time isn't a bother.

    (Before someone weighs in to let me know I could use the Auto Disk and just double-charge, I already know that.)

    .
     
  17. ants

    ants Member

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    I like the way you think, soybomb.

    Keep up the good work.
     
  18. Sport45

    Sport45 Member

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    I have a RCBS trickler and it has to be one of the least used gadgets I have. Like Mal H mentioned, it's much quicker to tap powder out of a scoop.
     
  19. TexasSkyhawk

    TexasSkyhawk Internet SEAL

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    Reckon I'm the odd handloader out then. . .

    I have an RCBS powder trickler and it is used on every single rifle round I reload, and most of my bullseye 44 Special loads. To make it even easier to use, I filled the bottom of it with lead from my casting furnace, then sealed it with silicone. This gives it a much heavier, solid feel and combined with the silicone "base," keeps it from moving around during use.

    Soybomb, spend $20 and get the Lee Perfect Powder Measure. Read and FOLLOW the directions (cycle about a pound of powder through it to get it good and broken in), and you'll never look back.

    I've had mine for about twenty years, and after it got broken in, it's never let me down and is one of the most accurate, consistent pieces of equipment on my reloading bench.

    Jeff
     
  20. David Wile

    David Wile Member

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    Hey Jeff,

    Like you, I'm a bid odd too with using an RCBS powder trickler I bought maybe 45 years ago. It is cast aluminum, and I wanted to make it a little heavier so it would tip less easily. I poured lead in the hollow bottom, but as soon as it hardened, it would fall out. I then drilled a 1/4 inch hole on each side, filled the bottom with lead, and the lead filled the holes and stayed put in the bottom. It still works like new after all these years.

    I would have to agree with the others that a trickler is not a necessity. To me it is a convenience.

    Best wishes,
    Dave Wile
     
  21. SDC

    SDC Member

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    At least part of this has to do with what rounds the OP is intending on reloading, and what press he's using; for a single-stage, I think dippers and a trickler would definitely be the way to go for maximum speed and accuracy, but if he's loading handgun rounds on a progressive (including something like a Lee Turret), the Autodisk is fine all by itself.
     
  22. bob kk

    bob kk Member

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    I have a electric powder trickler. That is a easy way to trickle small amounts. Small button switch on top. Just tap it with a finger. Bought it from Midsouth. Don't remember the name of it. Cost about 15 dollars a few years ago.
     
  23. evan price

    evan price Member

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    Lee at one time made an Auto-Disk that used a manual lever to move the disk- it was for bench-mounting. My FIL has one. Never seen another one.
     
  24. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Buy a quality measure, learn how to be consistent with it, and never trickle again.

    I throw powder from my measure and go. I never trickle to get it perfect and can load well under MOA ammo in rifle easily.

    But, if you are going to trickle, just use the dippers like Mal suggested.
     
  25. redneck2

    redneck2 Member

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    If you're going to be loading hundreds of rounds of pistol, a trickler would get old after a short time.

    I've got maybe $2,000 in reloading equipment and still use a measure, then trickle my rifle loads.

    FWIW...I found a Hornady rotary measure in the bargain stuff at a gun shop for maybe $25 a few years ago. I've got it mounted as a free standing measure.

    You can make your own measures by cutting off pistol cases until you get close to the correct charge. Strike the excess off with a business card, then trickle up to weight. Make handles out of wire.
     
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