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How tight when neck sizing

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by notchup, Dec 6, 2012.

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  1. notchup

    notchup Member

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    I am fairly new to reloading. I have done some .38 special and used the crimp to judge how tightly the bullet was held. I am just starting to reload some 7mm-08 using the 162 gr. A-max which doesn't have a cannelure. I have watched a couple of videos on youtube by ammosmith and I think I am pretty close. I can't seat the bullet by hand and I can't remove it by hand once it has been seated by the die. A couple of light raps in the bullet puller will unseat it, though.

    How do you gauge if the bullet is seated tight enough when neck sizing?
     
  2. kingmt

    kingmt Member

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    If you can push it against the desk & it doesn't move your good.
     
  3. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    It really depends on the purpose of the loaded round. Some target loads use such light neck tension there is a chance of leaving a bullet in the throat if the loaded round is extracted before firing. Most use a little more neck tension than that. The very, very, light neck tension needs to go with bullets seated into the lands to get good start pressure. For a round where the bullet is going to jump to the lands you need more neck tension. For a hunting load that absolutely needs to function, and is prone to being extracted unfired, you need enough neck tension so the bullet isn't easily moved when pushing against something.

    What is the purpose of the loaded round?
     
  4. 45lcshooter

    45lcshooter Member

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    Where you have it now is excatly right. A few knocks of a bullet puller and it pops out. Just follow your manuals for cartridge overall length for your specific grain bullet and you will be fine.

    Crimping, i crimp mine so the bullet doesnt wiggle or move around. Some people crimp the crap iut of their cases thus the life of the case is deminished alot. A light crimp so the bullet doesnt fall out or wiggle will work.
     
  5. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

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    As for revolver type handgun cartridges, or more specifically those that have a canelure, those need to be roll crimped to prevent the bullet from jumping out of the case mouth as it progresses toward battery allignment. I crimp these types just forward of the bottom of the canelure. A nice firm roll crimp is needed or one will very likely experience bullets jumping completely out of the case mouth, this is especially true when loading stout performing hand laods and magnum hand loads. Back when I first started reloading these type, my first cylinder reulted in my cylinder locking when the bullets came out of the case mouths, and powder every where.

    For auto loading handgun cartridges such as 9mm, .40 S&W, 45 ACP types, those don't rely on, nor utilize the crimp for neck tension purposes, at all. Those types head space on the mouth, so using more crimp than needed, as decribed below causes excessive head space, deformed bullets, and decreased neck tension, and mis-fires. The crimp on those types cartridges is only utilized as a means of removing the mouth belling used to make seating more consistently straight, and to prevent shaving of the bullet during seating. A taper cirmp is the proper crimping die for this purpose.

    Bottle neck cartridges do not need to be crimped at all except under very limited cirucmstances. Such actions that need cirmping include those with tubular fed magazines, 30-30 lever actions and other lever action rifles. And for auto loading actions, it is usually best to first check your rounds in the magazines to see if they are experiencing set back or forward jump before deciding to use any crimp. For instance, say you have a 30 round magazine, measure the OAL of the last 1 or 2 rounds in the magazine, then shoot all but those last 1 or 2 rounds, then measure their OAL checking for set back or jump. FYI, trying to cirmp bottle neck cases will more often cause you more problems than could even be solved. It is absolutely unnecessary to crimp any cartridge intended for a bolt action. There are very rare instances in which a bolt action would absolutely need to be crimped, 600 nitro magnum would probably be one of those necessary applications, as would the need for a physician to be at your side when discharging one of those beasts to treat your shattered shoulder.

    GS
     
  6. Fatelvis

    Fatelvis Member

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    I agree with that. Pushing the bullet into the side of your loading bench to see if it sets back into the case, works well. Also measure the outside of your case neck after sizing, but before seating a bullet, and measure the outside of that same neck after seating a bullet. If the seated bullet is .001"-.003" larger, you're doing good. Like Walkalong said, if its going to be used in a semiauto or tube magazine, maybe .002"-.003" range is best.
     
  7. FrankB1948

    FrankB1948 Member

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    I've never crimped any bottle neck cases, and have never had a problem even with my 300 win mag which has fairly stout recoil
     
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