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How to CC when hiking?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by BBQLS1, Jun 11, 2012.

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  1. BBQLS1

    BBQLS1 Member

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    I'm looking for different options for carry when hiking. It's very hot, humid, and you get very sweaty here in South Louisiana. I'm planning on carrying a small snub nosed revolver in .357 Mag. I have a blued Taurus 605 that works well except for the blued bit.... I'm thinking about buying a SP101 for this purpose.

    But the real question is: How to comfortably carry this gun when hiking? I'll have a pack with a Camelbak.... and it will be very hot and humid.

    Thanks for your suggestions!
     
  2. Upstater

    Upstater Member

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    I would go with a waist pack (fanny pack) type of system sweat and high humidity should not affect this system but will leave your gun at the ready.
     
  3. psyopspec

    psyopspec Member

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  4. Steel Horse Rider

    Steel Horse Rider Member

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    If you are hiking away from civilization why not open carry with a traditional holster on your belt?
     
  5. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    Shoulder holster. When you squat to defecate, your gun isn't on the ground.
     
  6. Snowdog

    Snowdog Member

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    I don't open carry as I don't care for the attention it often brings and I enjoy knowing the element of surprise is in my favor if it's ever needed.

    I still use the same tuckable holster while hiking in warm weather as I do for CCW. On occasion, I do use the .357sig barrel in the M&P40c, but at least the platform remains the same.

    I used to wear ThunderWear when when hiking and carried as large as a Steyr M40.

    I've seriously considered the SP101 with 3" in .327 mag just to have. I'm sure it will serve well for trail use.
     
  7. ForumSurfer

    ForumSurfer Member

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    It's hot and humid here in NC, too. I carry the same glock 26 in the same position I carry everywhere else (appendix, 3-4 o'clock OWB or 4 o'clock IWB). I carry it because I'm worried about those pesky two legged predators. If I were worried about animals, I'd be carrying a larger caliber in a revolver or a 10mm glock. It isn't comfortable, but it is comforting. :)

    I've tried thunderwear and I'm not a thunderwear guy, never will be. I find it annoying and uncomfortable to the point where I'd honestly rather be unarmed if that's my only method of carry. To each his/her own, though.

    I sweat profusely, more than most folk I do believe. No matter what I carry in, I'm going to get the weapon drenched in sweat as I am a very active guy. I'll sweat over, around or through sweat guards. I just deal with it and clean it accordingly. Its a glock, so I usually just wipe the outside down and the sights. A bunch of sweat isn't going to ruin it or make it fail.

    Fantastic advice. If you don't heed that advice, at least make sure your pants/firearm rig don't end up downrange from the firing line when you drop trousers.
     
  8. NavyLCDR

    NavyLCDR member

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    Open carry, drop leg holster. Otherwise you are severly sacrificing accessibility for the sake of concealment.
     
  9. 56hawk

    56hawk Member

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    Hip holster with a baggy shirt works well. I carry a 500ES in a cross draw when hiking.
     
  10. BBQLS1

    BBQLS1 Member

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  11. Ex-MA Hole

    Ex-MA Hole Member

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    I use a serpa holster and a J-Frame 637.

    The gun is light, and I can put a t shirt or bandana over it if I want it covered.
     
  12. psyopspec

    psyopspec Member

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    A J-Frame in a drop leg? A drop leg holster will not be faster than a belt holster for most people. The point of the drop leg is to get the weapon clear of body armor, which may be a requirement hiking in RC-E but generally won't be a concern in LA (I hope). I suppose the "get clear of gear" advantage could also apply to a large framed backpack with a kidney pack, but I have to say drop leg holsters can get very uncomfortable over long distances and add unnecessary weight/bulk for hiking. Instead, throw a safepacker (or any other holster of your choosing that will mount there) on the kidney belt. Go 12 o'clock, or appendix carry, or even strong side depending on the pack.
     
  13. Mainsail

    Mainsail Member

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    You don't want a drop leg holster for hiking, unless your definition of hiking is walking few hundred yards away from your car. The Bianchi flap holster can be clipped around most pack belts.

    EDIT: After rereading some of the responses, it might help if you define ‘hiking’ as you intend to use it. If you’re hiking with a belt through your blue jeans under your pack belt, you have a lot of options. If you’re going to engage in some serious hiking, wearing quick-drying hiking pants, and covering many miles with elevation changes, then that won’t be an option because those pants have no belt loops. Generally, hikers don’t wear a belt under their pack belt; it causes hot spots and pinches you. They don’t wear jeans either, but that’s another whole topic by itself.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2012
  14. BBQLS1

    BBQLS1 Member

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    Thanks for the feedback..... I'm starting slow, but some day I want to do what you are doing in the picture. I've got a long ways to go. :eek:
     
  15. ForumSurfer

    ForumSurfer Member

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    Good point, I never cover more than a few miles so I admittedly don't carry a large pack or specialized gear.
     
  16. Captains1911

    Captains1911 Member

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    I usually carry in one off these while hiking, and I too carry a camelbak pack. It is very discrete, looks more like a camera case really. Access is very quick with a little practice. I carry a G23. I sometimes carry in a Serpa around 3:30 to 4:00 but it doesn't conceal very well with the camelbak. My hikes typically range from 3-15 miles.

    http://www.hawkepaks.com/prod.itml/icOid/133

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2012
  17. JPG19

    JPG19 Member

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    My problem with carrying IWB at 4 o'clock (my edc position), is the belt on my backpack puts too much pressure on the weapon when secured. I like the idea of the drop leg holster. Can someone expand on why you don't want to wear one for long distances? I typically wear Mountain Khakis.
     
  18. psyopspec

    psyopspec Member

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    Reasons I don't use a drop leg for hiking:
    -It can be uncomfortable on the legs over longer distances. The straps can cause chafing, and they require periodic readjustment as they work their way down, vs. a good holster on a gun belt which will generally stay put even with a lot of movement. This won't be a factor for most day hikes, but moving over 10 miles on foot through mountainous terrain over a period of 72 hours while wearing over 50 lbs of gear is what I'm talking about. If you're not doing that, you don't need a drop leg. Even in that case, many will choose a chest-mounted rig on their plate carrier or body armor.

    -Many people mistakenly believe that a drop leg is a faster rig. They can be comparable to belt carry for speed with practice, but will not be faster for most folks, even with training. The beltline is closer to the endstate of a good shooting stance and is inherently faster because of it.

    -Just because it bears repeating, the purpose of the drop leg is to get your pistol clear of your body armor.

    -Very subjectively, if I see someone wearing a drop leg without a reason, that person's going to get a second glance. It's similar to if I show up at the range to find a group of acne-ridden teens dressed in black trench coats blowing ammo downrange. It may not be fair, but it conveys a black belt in mall ninjitsu. The reason I've honed this generality is that folks in and out of uniform downrange who habitually wear drop legs when they have no reason to, and other options are available, tend to be a dangerous sort - highly motivated and enthusiastic, but in an uninformed way because they don't get outside the wire much if at all. Not as bad as the ones who wear a shoulder rig down to the knee, but still worth keeping an eye on.

    Having said all that, if you decide to do it:

    -The most common newb error with a drop leg is to wear it out of reach. The pistol should still ride where you can grip it without having to lean heavy to one side. In fact, it should be adjusted to get clear of whatever you need it to get clear of, and no lower.

    -Practice your draw.

    -Like most holster types, the cheap ones that will fit any pistol tend to be of lower quality, less comfort, and either slower on the draw or lacking retention. If you're going to do it, spend the money and get a Safariland, 5.11 Thumb Drive, or Blackhawk Serpa that's designed for the gun in question.

    -Have a thick skin, and understand that the odd glances you're getting from others on the trail may have nothing to do with the fact that you're carrying a gun, and everything to do with your chosen method of carry.
     
  19. galena

    galena Member

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    I second psyopspec...........try the SafePacker..........very unobtrusive and very fast Keep shootin' and check 6
     
  20. splithoof

    splithoof Member

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    The Safepacker is a great outdoor method of low profile carry. To folks who don't do guns, it looks like a PDA or other electronic gadget case. I have seen them in the city, and likely nobody else but the person wearing it and myself know whats inside. It is a very durable, well made case that will last a long time.
     
  21. Lex Luthier

    Lex Luthier Member

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    OWB. It is the great outdoors, and the home of traditionally dangerous outdoor critters.

    I like to carry a wrist rocket and throwing knives also. It is fun sometimes to stop and pop.
     
  22. Dr.Rob

    Dr.Rob Moderator Staff Member

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    Safepacker. Doesn't look like a holster, can be put on your hip belt of the pack.
     
  23. HorseSoldier

    HorseSoldier Member

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    +1. That's what I use for hiking. I like the very nondescript but readily accessible format, as well as being able to belt carry, rig it on a rucksack weight belt, or sling it from a strap.

    Another +1. Though the FOB I'm on in A'stan (and every other FOB on the planet) is full of dolts who never got the memo, drop leg holsters are for carrying a pistol just low enough that your body armor doesn't interfere with a functional drawstroke. They're certainly not for strapping a pistol to your knee when wandering over to the Green Bean for a latte (again, that memo seems to not have made its rounds with staff officers, fobbits, and other people without significant weapons training). For hiking/rucking, the retention straps that go around your leg will start to annoy the hell out of you pretty quickly on a drop leg.

    [/soap box mode]
     
  24. tech30528

    tech30528 Member

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    I hike the AT and carry. I did a lot of research on this years ago, at the time I wasn't in to guns (oooh how times change) and just needed something light, durable, and with enough knock down power for the purpose. Keep in mind at the time I wasn't a shooter so I wanted something that could be inactive for long periods of time but work when I needed it. around here we have black bear (not very dangerous under most circumstances) and wild boar (always an unpredictable threat but not known for their stealth. If they are in the area you'll know it).

    My research showed that 9mm wasn't enough. Something in the .357sig/ 40 cal/ 10mm range is commonly used here for hunting boar. Of the three I went with the model 33 Glock because the .357 round is higher velocity than .40, and I run solids as opposed to hollow points for max penetration or alternating solids and HPs. The pistol loaded and a spare mag runs 2 pounds in the fanny pack and will work no matter what, which was really important to me. The nice thing about the carry arrangement is that if I'm in a suspect area I can carry around front and it doesn't alert other hikers, or if I'm in a populated area with lower risk I can spin the pack around to my back and it supports the weight of my backpack taking the load off my shoulders. Granted my 3 day summer pack is only 17 pounds, but we pound out 15-20 miles a day here on the AT in Georgia so light is key.

    I understand the revolver stance. I went with the Glock because it doesn't seem to matter if you find yourself armpit deep in quicksand, it's still going to work. It's usually in the fanny pack in a clip type soft holster that is tied to the bottom of the bag with about 3-4 inches of cord so it pulls free easy but travels with the trigger covered loaded with the slide locked back. All it requires is to pull and knock down the slide lock with your thumb and you are ready to go.
     
  25. Mainsail

    Mainsail Member

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    I've never heard of carrying in that configuration. I don't see much reason to do so, but whatever blows your kilt up. I carry my G20SF loaded with a round in the chamber and nine more in the magazine (downloaded to save weight) ready to go. If I need it (which admittedly is remote) I want it ready, not hoping the round chambers with whatever might have gotten inside the open slide/chamber.
     
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