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How to identify makers

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by AJumbo, Apr 30, 2011.

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  1. AJumbo

    AJumbo Member

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    I have a '58 Remington repro that I bought used. I'm well pleased with it, but would like to purchase a spare cylinder (or two or three) but don't know who the manufacturer is. What are the earmarks of the various makers? I suspect this one is a Pietta, but I just don't know. Thanks in advance for any help.
     
  2. arcticap

    arcticap Member

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  3. Kaeto

    Kaeto Member

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    That certainly don't help with the Colt Navy kit I've got as the only marking on it is
    "Black Powder Only- Made In Italy" and that type of marking isn't listed in the pdf. I admit it wasn't a very well made kit with all the tool marks on the barrell and it took lots of work to get it smooth. But I'm sure I didn't obliterate any makers marking.
     
  4. junkman_01

    junkman_01 member

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    What do you want......miracles? Take and post lots of pictures of the different areas of the gun and MAYBE someone can identify it.
     
  5. arcticap

    arcticap Member

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    From time to time we have been shown guns that don't have any maker's mark that originated from most of the Italian manufacturers. Sometimes the importer's name will provide a clue.
    Armi San Marco seems to have produced more guns than the others without any maker's marks. But some of those guns were marked with a New York address on the barrel.
    What's ironic is that some reenactors will pay to have the maker's marks removed, which is known as being defarbed.
    Then there's the guns that were exported by independent Italian gunsmiths and no one really knows who manufactured the parts for those guns or which gunsmithing outfit finished them.
    Examining measurements and features and then comparing them to the maker's known spec's of the time period might help, but there's no master list to follow.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2011
  6. Kaeto

    Kaeto Member

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  7. junkman_01

    junkman_01 member

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    Thank God! :scrutiny:

    (but you still don't know who made it! :neener:)
     
  8. Kaeto

    Kaeto Member

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    No, nor do I care who made it as long as I have a source for parts if needed. Oh and Junkman don't be sarcastic, you don't do it very well.
     
  9. junkman_01

    junkman_01 member

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    As a matter of fact...I do.
     
  10. Norton Commando

    Norton Commando Member

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    AJumbo - I'm in a similar predicament. I purchased an 1858 Remington in about 1982 as a kit that had very roughly machined surfaces on the barrel and frame. I spent hours filling and sanding these pieces smooth and in so doing, removed any identifying marks that may have existed. The result is a gun with absolutely no unique marks on it. So the manufacturer of this gun is anyone’s guess at this point.:(
     
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