Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

How to use a scope

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by brentn, Jul 18, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. brentn

    brentn Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2007
    Messages:
    870
    Location:
    Canada
    yep, I am 100% green in the art of long range shooting.

    I bought a scope for my 10/22 about a month ago, and although I have not used it I've played with it a little bit.

    There are dials on the top and right of the scope, and obviously they must be for vertical and horizontal crosshair adjustment.
    Peering through the scope and playing with the dials, it doesn't appear to do jack **** to the crosshair, not even when adjusting them full turns a few times...

    Is there a guide on the net with pictures, step by step stuff, for how to adjust and properly use a scope?

    I have a friend who could show me, but he's in school quite a bit, and doesn't have the time to go shooting anymore.

    Minimal laughter and ridicule would be appreciated ;P
     
  2. Dionysusigma

    Dionysusigma Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Messages:
    3,671
    Location:
    Okay City
    BWAAA HA HAAA! :D :neener:

    Sorry, had to be done. ;) Had the same questions as yourself when I first started.

    The click adjustments on a scope move a lens just a tiny fraction of a degree in the direction you rotate the knob. The reason why it doesn't look like anything's happening is that for the most part, it isn't. At distance, though, it'll be quite noticable when you start shooting with it.

    A few helpful links (and folks, you can laugh at me for citing Wikipedia, but the article's accurate *rimshot*).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telescopic_sight
    http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=154213

    The above-mentioned Zak Smith is the THR Patron Demi-God of Rifle Scopes. :)
     
  3. phridum

    phridum Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    26
    Why they don't seem to move...

    The adjustments are fairly tiny per click, usually 1/4 or 1/2 minutes of angle, depending on your brand of scope. It should have come with basic instructions for operation, and probably for zeroing (making the bullet hit where the crosshairs are).

    The dial on the right side will will adjust left and right. The top, up and down. It may designate on the dial which direction goes which way. If you think of it like a screw twisting in or out, that may help. Imagine the crosshairs as the tip of the screw.

    As the dials are adjusted, you have to think in orientation to bullets coming out of the barrel. If your rounds are high, and you want them to come down, you could simply aim equal distance below where you want to hit, OR (which is why scopes are adjustable) crank the crosshairs. Bringing the reticle down closer to the barrel, brings the barrel up, which brings the round up.

    A typical tactic (which is hard with a .22) is to sandbag the crap out of your rifle so it can't move even a fraction of a hair when it fires. Sight in at the bullseye, and then, without moving the rifle, fire 5 rounds. Again, without moving the rifle, adjust the crosshairs so that they are over the hole the bullet made in the paper.

    There is obviously more scientifically advanced and accurate dope-age and what not, but this is the skinny, in a layman thought process. Hope that helps.
     
  4. rangerruck

    rangerruck Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2006
    Messages:
    8,374
    Location:
    Texas, baby!
    most of those measurements that you see on the dials, say something like 1/4 in @100, which means, one click turn will move your bullet strike , on the paper, up or down, left of right, 1/4 inch at 100 yds. so if you are shooting at 50 yds, it will only be 1/8 of an inch, and if you were shooting at 200 yds, it would be 1/2 inch, etc., etc.
     
  5. toivo

    toivo Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    Messages:
    2,468
    Location:
    New York State
    That's assuming your 10/22 is capable of putting 5 rounds into the same hole. (Sorry, couldn't resist...) You might have to center the crosshairs over a group of holes.

    Yes, the only way you'll see the crosshairs move is in relation the target you're looking at. Another way is to get some of those sight-in targets that look like this:

    View attachment sightin.pdf

    Put the crosshairs on the center ring and fire a few rounds. Then see how far you're off horizontally and vertically. Make your adjustments and go again. You won't be looking through the scope as you make your adjustments--there's some trial and error involved; you see where you're hitting and say, "OK, I'm high and to the right," and adjust accordingly. Take a bunch of copies of the target with you. Unless your scope if pretty high-powered (14x or more), a spotting scope or some good binoculars will come in handy, too.

    Doing it this way, you don't have to worry about keeping the gun locked down on the sandbags, starting over again if you bump the gun, etc. You can re-aim at the center ring each time you fire. You might get away with just using a front rest. Make sure your crosshairs are centered perfectly on the center ring, and keep the rifle as steady as possible. It's not quite as technical as the other way, but works well enough for most casual shooters.
     
  6. phridum

    phridum Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    26
    Naturally, toivo. I suppose I should have taken that factor into consideration if I bothered to break it down as I had.

    However, as I eventually learned of my father after being properly trained, not everyone can shoot as well as they think. The sandbag method takes shooter error out of the question...as far as accurate shooting goes, they COULD err in other areas...

    If you have that much time, ammo, or patience, bracketing the bullseye is certainly a possible method. However, if he subconsciously is pulling the rounds down and left, due to inexperience or whatnot, he will zero in favor of this.

    He will be hitting what he wants, but he's reinforcing poor skills and not actually improving his marksmanship.

    It all depends I guess on whether the ends justifies the means :p
     
  7. toivo

    toivo Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    Messages:
    2,468
    Location:
    New York State
    You're right, phridum. Just to clarify for brentn: What phridum is describing is really the right way to do it. I was giving you a "quick and dirty" method.
     
  8. Navy joe

    Navy joe Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,362
    Location:
    VA
    I will try to break it down for you.

    Mount the scope tightly to the rifle. Tightly. The rings must be tight on the base or gun, and the rings must be tight around the scope. Your rings should have come with torque specs, consistently tight is as important as tight.

    Make sure the crosshairs are level when you mount it, as in the vertical is in line with the vertical axis of the gun and the horizontal is perpindicular. This can probably be eyeballed for your purposes, but there are plenty of gadgets out there.

    While you are mounting it tightly, set your eye relief. This is the distance from your eye at which the view through the scope is full. It should be set so that the view is full when your head is on the stock where you will be most comfortable shooting.

    Center the dials windage(horizontal) and elevation(vertical). Do this by turning them all the way one way until they stop. Turn them all the way the other way while counting the clicks. Now turn them back half the number of clicks.

    You cannot use the sandbag sight down the bore method as described because you cannot pull the bolt and see down a 10/22 as can be done with many bolt actions. You can have a gunsmith laser boresight it, but .22 ammo is cheap.

    Start close, say 10 yards. With the crosshairs on the aiming point fire 3 rounds. Note the impact. The windage and elevation knobs are marked in the direction they will shift impact, so if you are high and left turn the knobs for low and right. At 10 yards you should be left and right centered and about an inch low. Once you get there move to 25 yards, fire some good groups and refine your adjustments until Point of Aim(POA) and Point of Impact(POI) are the same.
     
  9. phridum

    phridum Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    26
    Boresighting CAN be used to get you a headstart when zeroing a rifle, which is especially useful if zeroing your brand new AI Arctic Warrior in .338 Lapua Magnum...zeroing in as few rounds as possible would be great when they cost $75 for a box of 20 match grade!

    However, I never mentioned boresighting. I don't know what my technique is called, but it could be referred to as, "The Cement in Sandbags and Adjust Reticle to Where it ACTUALLY Hit" method...just throwing that out there.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2007
  10. Zak Smith

    Zak Smith Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    9,037
    Location:
    Fort Collins, CO, USA.
    If it's safe, the "shoot at the big dirt clod and adjust" method works well too. Just sort-of look down the barrel to sanity check that you won't be shooting over the berm.
     
  11. phridum

    phridum Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    26
    Ha, I'm not familiar with that method, Zak. That would imply a lack of confidence in myself...something I have sought, but never found ;)
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page