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Hunting boot advice

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by BrainOnSigs, Oct 20, 2009.

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  1. BrainOnSigs

    BrainOnSigs Member

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    I realized that I needed to upgrade my gear for future cold weather hunts out west. I am set for clothes. The last piece of the puzzle is a pair of dedicated hunting boots. I keep seeing Irish Setter boot products (part of Red Wing Shoes) getting great reviews.

    This is the one I was looking at.


    Irish Setter Mountain Claw hunting boots

    Any thoughts or brand reviews?
     
  2. schlockinz

    schlockinz Member

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    Go to a store, try on every boot, go to more stores, try on every boot, buy the most comfortable one.
     
  3. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Down here, if it ain't waterproof and snake proof with knee high tops, I ain't interested. :D The snake proof thing has already paid off a couple of times. Buzz worms are thick in the spring down here.
     
  4. dakotasin

    dakotasin Member

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    i run meindl's and am happy w/ them. i mostly got them because they weren't made in china, and ended up being happy. a pair of ultimax wool socks and i'm good w/ these boots to sub-zero...
     
  5. okierifleman

    okierifleman Member

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    Exclusively Danner, they will last forever and are the most comfortable boot I have ever worn.
     
  6. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    I think it's important to recognize that different boot companies use different lasts and have different design philosophies. They fit different people differently.

    Danners might be the best boots in the world, but they dont' fit my feet. It's unfortunate, but it's so. The same might be true for you with Irish Setters (a Red Wing brand BTW, and Red Wing has a solid rep), Brownings, Wolverines, or whatever you can name. Opinions will vary, and some last longer than others, but objectively, they all make perfectly good boots, especially for a Floridian that won't be wearing them daily for half the year. It's not like you'll wear them out real soon. Irish Setters are great boots -- IF they fit you.

    I often go out in my Asolo TPS 535s. Those and the Gore-Tex versions are IMO some of the best boots around -- if they fit YOUR feet.:)

    But they're not insulated. I have 600 gram Thinsulate, Gore-Tex Wolverines that have worked well for me in the cold.

    Note that there's a huge difference in what your feet need if you're sitting or standing in cold wind, versus hiking around actively while it happens to be cold outside.

    Meindls are good boots, too, of course.

    This company in Montana isn't cheap, but they've got what you need: http://www.kenetrek.com/

    I'd go try some on, if I were you. That's step 1.:)
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2009
  7. Fremmer

    Fremmer Member

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    I hear good things about Irish Setter brand. I think you really need to buy the boots from a store, so that you can make sure they fit (not too tight!) before you buy. Some brands will fit your feet better than others. I'd love to buy Danners, but they are just too narrow for my toes. So I'd buy them in person and not over the internet.

    One factor is weight. You want a lighter boot if you are going to be hoofing around a lot. You can go heavier if you are going to spend most of your time in a stand. For really cold weather (it gets cold here in the Midwest, too), I wouldn't go less than 800 grams of insulation. 800 to 1000 grams for standard hunting (some still, some stalking), more insulation if you're going to be sitting motionless in a stand most of the time. But you won't want tons of insulation if you're going to be doing some walking around.

    Goretex is a must, very waterproof and, more importantly, it will breathe. Use a light polyester inner sock (dress socks work, lol) as first layer, heavy wool or wool/polyester mix as outside sock. You need enough room in the boot to be able to move your toes pretty freely with the socks on, which is why you'll bring them when you go to the store and try on boots. Lighter boots will be a blessing if you're walking around, so it's worth it to pay more for a lighter boot.

    JMHO, lol.

    Edited to add: Geez, me and Armed Bear almost posted the same thing at the same time. LOL!!!
     
  8. highorder

    highorder Member

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    I wear Matterhorns with 200g of Thinsulate. They are great for walking, but I wouldnt want to sit for 8 hours in sub-freezing temps. I used to have a pair of Sorels with 800g of insulation, and my feet were sloppy sweaty by the time I reached my blind.
     
  9. Fremmer

    Fremmer Member

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    Yep, it depends on the feet. Some people sweat more, some less. And it always depends on how far you have to walk, too.
     
  10. Ed Harris

    Ed Harris Member

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    No one winter hunting boot is best. Which type of boot you need depends upon the terrain and type of hunt and mode of transport. Do you need to walk in cold-dry-rocky terrain, slog through wet snow, dry snow, ride a horse, snowmobile, work on snowshoes? Use cross-country skis?

    For foot travel in rocky, cold-dry country a mountaineering boot and gaiters are a good choice.

    For foot travel in the cold-wet Pacific Northwest a Pac-boot with removable boiled felt liner and traction sole is better.

    If you must travel on horseback or in snake country your needs will be entirely different.

    If you will be on snowshoes or skis, you will need still something else.

    If you haven't been on a western hunt before, follow the advice of your outfitter.
    Get your boots early enough to wear them alot, so they are thoroughly broken in and be sure they are comfortable.

    Also have a comfortable pair of lighter weight shoes to wear around camp while your hunting boots are drying out.

    Also recommend a boot bag for carrying the boots, to keep the rest of your pack and gear clean.
     
  11. Blue Brick

    Blue Brick Member

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    I use Coleman, sold at Big 5.
     
  12. ~z

    ~z Member

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    I have tried several over the years and have been very happy with my new Rocky Blizzard Stalkers. http://www.rockyboots.com/Product-D...Rocky_BlizzardStalker_Waterproof_Winter_Boot/
    I spend about equal time walking and sitting to glass. These boots are a happy medium for that. They would be too hot to walk all day in. But again as said, feet are different. Try on as many as you can, but em big and carry extra socks on the hunt. Another piece of advice: throw them in the bottom of your sleeping bag overnight. Makes the mornings much nicer.
    ~z
     
  13. f4t9r

    f4t9r Member

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    Go try those boots on. Like the fit, BUY THEM.
    I like both Irish Setters & Danner
     
  14. highorder

    highorder Member

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    Absolutely.

    "approach" shoes, or "camp" shoes are crucial so you can get out of your boots, and dry them out.
     
  15. paintballdude902

    paintballdude902 Member

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    id look into lacrosse i have a set with gore-tex liners and they have never let me down, i payed like 80 bucks for them on sale from cabelas. they now have atleast 100 miles on their soles since i hike 10 miles a week during hunting season and now that im in the mountains ive been hiking atleast 5 a week since i got here so just since i moved here ive done over 40 miles in them

    im goin on 2 years now and the only time ive gotten water in them was when i wore them whitewater rafting (i know stupid but i dont own tennis shoes) and the water filled up the raft
     
  16. bad_aim_billy

    bad_aim_billy Member

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    ditto on Lacrosse, and ditto on trying lots of different models in a store
     
  17. RoostRider

    RoostRider Member

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    Take the advice of experienced hunters in your area....

    What works GREAT here as a hunting boot in MN might very well be HORRIBLE in FL... It's pretty cold in Northern MN during hunting seasons (it snowed, and stuck, here two weeks ago), I bet it's LOTS warmer there... just a hunch... lol... same goes for your swamps vs ours (depth, temp, amount of bog vs water, etc...)

    A guy who has been through what you are heading into will have a better idea for you.
     
  18. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    I have and use 2 pairs of boots...USA-made Danners - one with 200 gram and one with 800 gram insulation. Have had one resoled by Danner. I'm not a big fan of Chinese boots - I prefer the siing of US-made boots. If I could manage it, I would also look at Gokey hand-mades from Orvis or Russel's. Boots are more important than your rifle when climbing those Western mountains
     
  19. bswiv

    bswiv Member

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    "especially for a Floridian that won't be wearing them daily for half the year."

    Don't know exactly what that means? Bow season starts in Sept. & Turkey season ends in May.......we can hunt hogs all year......? And while we do not have the rocks and it surely does not get as cold you do need good boots to keep the water and the snakes and the briars off of you.

    What was said about "different lasts" is correct. I've high insteps and narrow heals and some boots just do not cinch up snug comfortable. Mine end up always being ones with a lot of laces so that I can adjust them.

    As stated you need to try a bunch of them on, and do it with the socks you will be wearing.

    And if waterproof is a big deal Gore Tex has a longer warrenty than most of the other stuff..............but none of it will last more than a couple of years at best if you use them a lot.......like we do here in Florida.
     
  20. atblis

    atblis Member

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    danner

    Can you still get USA made Danners? If so, where?
     
  21. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Yes.

    However, you don't want the same boots for cold Winter hunts in the West. Trust me, you really, really don't.:)

    I'd spend the most money on boots I was going to wear several times a week for much of the year (durable, waterproof-breathable snake boots, uninsulated, it sounds like for you).

    I'd just make sure that the Western Winter boots are appropriately insulated, comfortable and fit right. Decent, warm boots that are plenty durable enough for a week here and there can be found for a much more reasonable price than boots that last through hell and high water.
     
  22. Rembrandt

    Rembrandt Member

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  23. gunmn74

    gunmn74 Member

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    I have great luck with Rockies and Brownings.
     
  24. Fremmer

    Fremmer Member

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    I like the Brownings I have. warm and dry.
     
  25. kentucky_smith

    kentucky_smith Member

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    I've got a pair of Irish Setter upland boots. After 3 seasons, still love them.
     
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