Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Hunting in Juneau, Alaska

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by mjb, Jul 4, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. mjb

    mjb Member.

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2004
    Messages:
    324
    Location:
    Florence, Kentucky
    I had a job offer in Juneau. I want to know how much it would cost to fly out to the Tongass National Forest to hunt. You cannot drive a vehicle out of Juneau. I do not want to move to a place thinikng that I am in a great hunting area only to not be able to afford it once I am there.
     
  2. Towboater

    Towboater Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2009
    Messages:
    66
    Location:
    Texas
    Don't know bud, but I fly in September for a black bear trip. I'll keep you posted :)
     
  3. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2005
    Messages:
    25,270
    Location:
    The end of the road between Sodom and Gomorrah Tex
    Well, Sarah Palin says they have a negative tax rate up there, no property taxes. WOW, NO PROPERTY TAXES! My GAWD, that sounds nice! Not that you'd have to own any property to hunt in Alaska or anything. You get paid for living there. I'm thinkin' about it, just not sure I can stand 40 below. I'm sure the cost of living up there is steep, but then, there are the outdoorsman's perks.
     
  4. BFE

    BFE Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Messages:
    116
    -40 is not as bad as it sounds being it's a dry cold instead of a wet cold. I hunted Alberta in -42 deg for most of a week and would not mind living in it at all.
     
  5. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2005
    Messages:
    23,171
  6. saltydog452

    saltydog452 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Messages:
    1,705
    I seem to recall that there are (were?) about 40 something miles of paved roads there.

    Check members on this and other forums for a gent with the handle 'float pilot'. He has posted regarding wind drift for .223 at sub zero temps and a serious cross wind.

    salty
     
  7. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2005
    Messages:
    25,270
    Location:
    The end of the road between Sodom and Gomorrah Tex
    Well, coldest I was ever in was 45 minutes inside the peroxide freezer at work at 20 below. I was DANGED glad to get back out in the heat, LOL! Of course, you dress for it. It's over 100 today, so actually, a trip into those freezers doesn't sound that bad, today.

    I do remember walking around in shirt sleeves in camp at 17 degrees in New Mexico in the snow. It's very dry out there, too, so I get your point. 17 degrees here and I'm wearing everything I have to wear just to go to the danged mailbox. :rolleyes:
     
  8. SHvar

    SHvar Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    648
    Not that I enjoy very cold, in fact it takes a while for me to get used to it, but if I dress for it Im ready, so are my 2 buddies.
    Picture368.jpg
    Picture366.jpg
    And one of their girlfriends.
    Picture364.jpg
    Note, these pictures taken above, all 3 are in their summer coats, not their winter coats, Ive already disposed of a few trash bags full of fur.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RofokCr99HQ
     
  9. stevelyn

    stevelyn Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2003
    Messages:
    3,290
    Location:
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    It doesn't get that cold down in southeast. Those are Fairbanks and interior temperatures. A cold temperature for Juneau would be single digits above 0* F. It's a maritime climate that moderates temperatures to a fairly narrow range. Be prepared for rain........Lots of it. Gore-Tex and polar fleece are your friends. A heavy duty set of Grundens, Helly-Hansen or Dutch Harbor Gear heavy rain gear and a pair of Extra-Tuffs boots are your friends too.

    A better way to hunt the area IMO would be from a boat. There are a lot of coves and islands to hunt. You just cruise the beach from off-shore and chop the power and shoot or land a skiff and stalk from there.

    There are several places up here that have no property taxes, (I'm actually buying retirement property in an area specifically because of no property taxes) but the City and Borough of Juneau isn't one of them. Juneau tends to be more leftist than the rest of the state with the exception of districts within the gravitational pull of the universities.
     
  10. caribou

    caribou Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    1,618
    Location:
    North West Alaska
    What are "property tax's?"~~LOL!!~~ (we have a local 4% sales tax, thats it)

    Next to the ocean, your temps are rather mild, rather than the interiors etreams of cold and hot. Dont get very hot either.

    Stevelyns right on the spot, Save $$$ and hook up with guys that own boats, a much more "Doable" hunt than findin landing strips on mountain sides or beaches.

    Mom and the rest of my family are nearby in Sitka, and from where Ive hunted with my brother, Boats are a chaeper more efficent hunt.

    Either way, you are in good grounds.

    Good luck
     
  11. Keb

    Keb Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2005
    Messages:
    326
    Location:
    Colo & WA
    You can take the Alaska Ferry to nearby places to go hunting.
     
  12. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2005
    Messages:
    25,270
    Location:
    The end of the road between Sodom and Gomorrah Tex
    That's familiar, state capitals are always the magnet of leftists. Austin is the San Francisco of the south.

    If I moved there, probably be on the southern coast somewhere. The climate seems better and I'd prefer to have forests around, not out on the tundra like Caribou. I might could even use my bow there. LOL
     
  13. stevelyn

    stevelyn Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2003
    Messages:
    3,290
    Location:
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    You wouldn't like it out here on the AKPEN either. It's alder bushes, grass and moss.

    I prefer the interior myself.
     
  14. weezak

    weezak Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    i've lived in Juneau for more than ten years now and other than the left wing hippies that live downtown and the cost of living, its a great place for the outdoor enthusiast.

    Yeah winter, spring and fall are all very damp to say the least and the state bird is the mosquito but you learn to deal with it. Lots of deer hunting, sheep to the north and south, moose north and south, bear (black and brown) are everywere.

    using a boat to get farther from town than your average weekend warrior deffinitely improves your chances of success. I've also had extremely good luck just hiking back into the woods from town or using the extensive network of hiking trails to get back in a ways then going my own way.

    if your gonna hike, wet, steep and slippery are words that all together or in any combination could be used on any given day. Extremely thick underbrush and a lovely plant called Devels Club are one of the high points of hiking also. At least no one will be able to say you took the easy way out though.
     
  15. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Messages:
    23,648
    Location:
    Los Anchorage
    Juneau is a long way from Alaska in some respects ;-) My bro lives down there and like a lot of folks in SE he has more contact with Seattle than Anchorage or the rest of the state. It's a panhandle on the rain coast. The climate is very distinct from the rest of the state. The politics are also distinct, as SE tends to be left of center.

    But on the plus side, you can take a boat or plane ride out of there and be in excellent GMU's very quickly. It's wet and steep. The Devils Club is a treat that has thorns just like shards of glass.
     
  16. moose fat

    moose fat Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Location:
    Overlooking the Yukon R. delta
    And don't forget Spruce Hens aka Hooters. You can wander around up and down the Forest Service trails hooting on a beer bottle, or pop bottle, with a .22. I always got a crick in my neck looking up in the trees.:D

    A boat/skiff the winter snows push the Sitka Black Tail down to the saltwater. Or before winter hike up to the alpine medows.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page