Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

I always thought of myself as a "Colt" guy

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by gmh1013, Mar 17, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. gmh1013

    gmh1013 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Messages:
    414
    Location:
    Phoenix AZ
    With the snake guns thay I love so much and the 1911 ...whats not to like?
    But with all the new revolvers and Autos Ruger is putting out and keeping the price down has turned me into a Ruger Guy.
    The SP101 is what brought me down this path to guns I just cant say no to
    In the past 2 months .....6 new Rugers.....I cant help myself!
     
  2. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    7,348
    Ain't nothing wrong with a Ruger. I often carry a SP101.
     
  3. Remllez

    Remllez Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    980
    Ruger makes good stuff at a good price, always have always will. The only fly in the ointment is triggers, which is easy to take care of yourself with the modular design, which makes them easy to clean/work on.

    The fit and finish has always been good to excellent, and the lockup is crazy good. The new designs are appealing to a wider demographic and sales seem to be strong. I've been shooting Rugers for 40+ years now and currently own 2. They will serve you well for years to come.....
     
  4. Coyote3855

    Coyote3855 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    1,936
    Location:
    Wyoming
    I have Ruger .22 Autos and like them. My only beef is they are heavy and hold 10 rounds. I carry a Speed Six stainless 2 3/4" in the woods. I shot a pair of old Vaqueros in SASS competition until they broke. So Rugers can wear out, but these were an easy fix.
     
  5. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    23,908
    Location:
    Arizona
    I too like Colt's, but they have to be older ones because the current selection isn't very good. The current corporate management (not that in the handgun part) have taken a major manufacturer and made it into a small semi-custom shop. A lack of new parts and qualified repair 'smiths doesn't help the situation, nor in some cases collector-level prices. Still once and awhile lightning strikes and the quality workmanship they are famous for is unlikely to ever be seen again.
     
  6. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    13,129
    As someone already posted there's nothing wrong with a Ruger. I'm particularly fond of my Single Six, my Vaquero, and my Blackhawks. Now if only they would bring back the Security Six series.
     
  7. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,346
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    could not agree more.

    However, why doesn't Ruger do a better job on their trigger?

    Sure, you can buy a Wolf kit and install it easily, but why should you have to?
     
  8. Remllez

    Remllez Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    980
    Guillmero,

    Reliability......Lawyers.....my best guesses.
     
  9. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,346
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    Remllez,

    Being smoother should not raise liability.

    And Wolf springs are not known for affecting reliability unless you get really light.
     
  10. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    14,252
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    Most factory sixguns are oversprung to overcome the inherent roughness. I install lighter springs in all my guns but only after polishing the innards.
     
  11. PabloJ

    PabloJ Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2010
    Messages:
    4,997
    Ruger is smokin hot with many nice products to offer: LCP, LCR, LC9, 1911, .308 scout bolt carabine,...... quite honestly I didn't think Colt made guns to the public any more.
     
  12. Remllez

    Remllez Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    980
    Got me there Guillermo,

    Ruger was late to the game and all the good action designs were used up by Colt and Smith. The modular design is the simplest of the three and if you gave my granny an Arkansaw stone or two and Iowegan's guide she could smooth one out.....LOL

    Ruger single actions are usually very comparable and I've had double action Rugers that are as good as Smith's without any further work. I've got an SP that came from the factory buttery smooth. I rarely change springs in any gun. However on occasion I've opened and smoothed a Ruger or two and was amazed at the pull afterward even with factory springs.

    It really doesn't bother me to do it and I know I have saved money over any comparable Smith. I own many Smith guns and overall they do have better triggers but a Ruger can be just as good.
     
  13. oldfool

    oldfool Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2009
    Messages:
    2,026
    Location:
    Thomasville, Georgia
    only thing better than one brand is 6 or 7 brands
    everybody ought own a Ruger or two or more

    gotta' 2nd that one 'weakness', the DA trigger, notably on the SPs
    They could do it better, if they wanted to, and I don't buy the too oft cited "lawyer thing" excuse myself

    I think Craig C nailed it
     
  14. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,346
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    Gunsmithin' granny

    Sounds like a "reality" ("reality" = "poorly scripted and acted") show.

    It would surely be better than Sons of Guns or American Guns.

    I would give it a chance.
     
  15. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    14,252
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    Ain't that the truth!!!
     
  16. drunkensobriety

    drunkensobriety Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2012
    Messages:
    52
    Location:
    Illinois.
    Ruger's -able- to "make good stuff at a good price" because they're not shy or even hesitant about dumping money into their R&D for the purpose of advancing production techniques.

    Most companies have engineers who do little else than try to cut corners to lower costs by finding things they can skimp on. This can be made of mim, that can be subcontracted out, this piece or part can be made of substandard materials, this or that doesn't need polished, this way can have lots of chatter marks because it's rarely seen, etc. etc. -

    Ruger has an entire engineering team which does nothing but think up ways to make production cheaper by continually updating or advancing production techniques so that they can make the gun or part a little faster and a little cheaper without skimping on fit / finish / part quality. Unless you're a gunsmith: you're probably unaware, but 90% of what Ruger produces is cast.

    It just so happens that they've developed casting technology which is ridiculously superior to any other example of casting. You can drill and tap their receivers, blue them, case harden them, put a 2000 polish - whatever you want. You'll never find weak spots, cracks, voids, free floating carbon: no flaws of almost any kind. All the materials are almost always listed as "alloy" and that's because it's cast. Receivers, pistols, everything but barrels and stamped parts. It's cast.

    It just so happens: their castings are so good - you can't tell.

    When you invest time and money into continually updating and increasing your production capability: you can continually lower your cost of production without lowering your quality control measures. It's a short term loss and long term gain business model: and I wish the rest of the US based corporations would pay the &^%$ attention to it.

    When all you do is cut corners in order to lower production cost: you create a short term gain in terms of production cost but you'll eventually have less and less customers buying from you. Which creates a downward spiral in which you're laying people off to lower production cost - while simultaneously lowering production capability. Chasing a short term gain with a long term loss will eventually bankrupt you: thus Winchester's current state. Started with the "post 64's" and continued a downward spiral, now it's not even an American company.

    Ruger follows a -WORKING- business model which should theoretically ensure continued success in the market place, because they go out of their way to appease and appeal to both their customer base and their investors.

    From the -old model- super blackhawks to the new model super blackhawks: there is no decline in quality. A hawkeye today is just as good as one from 40 years ago. Point of interest: on most of their inventory they've continued to develop newer designs of older product lines and they've only INCREASED the quality, capability or reliability. Hawkeye mark I v.s. Hawkeye mark II - case in point, a few definite advantages and improvements.

    Ruger is an "American Success."
     
  17. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    14,252
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    Absolutely, great post! Ruger has turned a profit every year since its inception. They are debt-free and operate on cash. How many other American gunmakers can you say that about?
     
  18. MMCSRET

    MMCSRET Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Messages:
    2,961
    Location:
    North Central Montana, across the Wide Missouri
    Ruger has made some good ones but, I'm still on the back order list for a new XGI!!!!!!!!!!!
    Been on that list about 30 years now. I call and verify that I'm still on the call list for when it comes in, make sure they have my current address and telephone number.
     
  19. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    23,908
    Location:
    Arizona
    It's obvious that Guillermo isn't in the gun manufacturing business. :neener:

    He and others are lamenting that Ruger revolvers don't come with hand-polished lockwork and reduced tension springs. Well so far as polishing is concerned, "back when... " they used to do a lot of that - Colt in particular.

    Today the only revolver they still make is the Single Action Army, with a MSRP well over one thousand bucks. For all practical purposes they are out of the business.

    Ruger isn't.

    Bill Ruger's goal from the beginning was to design and engineer firearms that were nearly (or actually) better then those of his competitors, but retailed for less. He knew full well that if his products sold for the same money as say, a Colt or Smith & Wesson that most buyers would buy the latter. To do this he used innovative manufacturing methods that allowed him to eliminate a lot of machining operations. Internal surfaces and inside the cylinder window of investment cast frames are left as they come out of the mold where Colt and S&W frames, that are made from forgings are machined. The difference is minor and makes no practical difference, but it is noticeable on the price tag.

    You may want somebody's Granny to polish your lockwork, but I for one don't. Any gunmaker that has a service department can tell you horror stories about some of Granny's work that comes across they're work benches. If you really want a case of heart failure look inside a fine older Colt hand ejector (such as a Detective Special or Official Police) that someone who didn't have the slightest idea about what they were doing tried to "tune the action," or "adjust the timing."

    The springs Ruger uses are intended to insure absolute reliability under any and all circumstances," If you want to lower the tension that's your business, and if you speak to "someone with authority" at the company in private they may tell you that non-factory springs and polishing jobs don't upset them too much because they provide an iron clad defense if the gun doesn't work and someone tries to sue them. It also relieves them of any responsibility to fix the gun on their dime.

    Now since this thread was supposed to be about Colt’s, maybe we can return to the original subject, and possibly do some serious thinking about what caused they’re downfall as a major handgun manufacturer.
     
  20. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,346
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    It wouldn't take much to do a heck of a lot better than they do with regards to polishing. (since they do ZERO)

    And I doubt a 13 lb trigger is required for reliable ignition.

    The OP WAS a Colt guy, now Ruger.

    This is not a thread hijack
     
  21. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,346
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
  22. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2005
    Messages:
    11,274
    Location:
    TN
    I'm a "Colt Guy" and have actually purchased some Rugers and S&W handguns. If you are a "Colt Guy" now, that typically means you're a collector or hoarder of fine Colt handguns. Guilty as charged!

    In the last couple of years, Ruger has introduced new products that are taking the market by storm. Ruger listens to the public. Don't be surprised if you see a LCR-22M (Mag) in the future as mentioned in another thread.

    I still prefer S&W products overall to Ruger. But my last two firearm purchases have been Rugers. But I still drool over Colts.
     
  23. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,346
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I just said it might make a good show.

    I can't find a decent gunsmith in Austin to save my life.
     
  24. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    14,252
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    I've never been able to find a decent local gunsmith. In FL or TN. Have had to be satisfied with the long wait times of the nationally recognized `smiths. In which case, I'd rather wait for something good than get my guns ruined by somebody closer.
     
  25. Remllez

    Remllez Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    980
    No worries Guillmero,

    It is a Ruger thread, don't know how it could be interpreted as anything else. As far as Colts downfall, wasn't nothin but bad management. Colts management was the poster child for how not to run a business, from their problems dealing with their employees to antiquated machining/manufacturing methods to ignoring the very people that bought their guns, from Government contract M-16's to their double actions.

    There's no mystery to their downfall, arrogance and an overt unwillingness to change with the times that's about it! Colts management fought change tooth and nail, and they bit off more than they could chew, happens all the time. In a word they caused their own demise. Some would say Colt got exactly what it deserved, now, their a small time player in a world economy.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page