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I don't like serrated edges, change my mind!

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by jmr40, Sep 13, 2020.

  1. Obturation
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    Obturation Contributing Member

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    I don't like serrated blades much, I like razor sharp straight edges. Just my preference. I've had several serrated blades but never needed the teeth to get the job done. IMO even a high end good quality knife the combo edge screams gas station knife. If a knife will have a serrated section I'll take a fixed blade with a saw back.
     
  2. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    I traditionally have preferred plain edged blades. However, Sal Glesser of Spyderco points out that adding serrations adds cutting surface to a same-length blade. Also, at least one specific steel (H1) actually changes physical properties after being work- hardened by serrating. So you get two benefits: adding over 40% additional cutting surface, and making the steel capable of taking an extremely long-lasting edge. For knives with that steel, it seems a no-brainer.

    On other knives, it's personal preference. Sam and I are working on a knife that will probably just have serrations on the back, near the tip.
     
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  3. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

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    Some tasks require different blade styles, in a perfect world we’d carry two knives with two different blades.

    In the real world, I find it more convenient to just carry a slim knife with a combo blade, like the one in my EDC Kershaw Leek.
     
  4. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    Well, given the sort of things sold as beefsteaks, that probably ought have Spaulding written on them, using a serrated blade is near a requirement.
    Why a person would want to serve these tough as rubber 'maters, is beyond me.

    Now, serrated knives do have a place in a kitchen. Crusty bread is a good example, a serrated blade will cut the crust without crushing the loaf. Also, dense breads, and the vegetable loaves, will benefit from a serrated edge, for needing less pressure to slice them.

    Serrated edge is my go-to for corn on the cob (other than when removing the kernels, that's chef knife territory). But, for making a full ear into a partial one, where you cutting across the cob, that serrated blade is the cat's meow.
     
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  5. theotherwaldo

    theotherwaldo Member

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    Green beefsteak tomatoes are even tougher and almost require a serrated knife - but they sure taste great when battered and fried!
     
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  6. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    I don't own anything currently with serrations. But I may consider one that is at least partially serrated some day soon. I still think that most of the time I'm going to prefer a regular blade, but there are times where serrations can come in handy.
     
  7. HiDive

    HiDive Member

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    The trouble with the Kershaw Leek serrations is that they are virtually impossible to shapen without sending them back to Kershaw. At least the serrations from spyderco can be sharpened to a certain degree by most people. And even with the Spyderco serrations you can not get them back to perfect unless you have the right tool. These ceramic rods have the Spyderco serration profile made into them and will bring the edge back even when damaged. This Spyderco Autonomous has been used hard and put away wet, literally as it is my diving knife. I have damaged it quite a bit by cutting fishing line including metal leaders and have been able to get most of the nicks and gouges out of it. On normal sharpening it gets the edge better than factory sharp, but it is a lot of work. This is one reason that I do not like serrations. But the main reason is that they simply do not do a better job of cutting any material. They can be hard to drive through some materials and take longer to cut as well.

    Spyder%20serrations-XL.jpg
     
  8. HiDive

    HiDive Member

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    I thought that the serrations were cut into the blade prior to heat treatment. I have heard that the H1 is work hardened by normal use, however I still find that it is not nearly as tough as some of the other choices. The one big advantage that H1 has is it's corrosion resistance and that is why I own several knives that use it, since I work on the ocean and dive at work and recreationally. I cut a wide variety of materials, especially rope of various materials and my plain edge Pacific salt cuts better than the serrated models on every material, including rope. Just because the serrations give more cutting surface does not mean that it gets used efficiently. In my experience I will still take a plain edge on an H1 bladed knife or any other material for that matter.
     
  9. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    :scrutiny: Huh.

    Well, the manufacturer- famous for testing his knives, and honestly reporting the results- says differently.
     
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  10. lemaymiami

    lemaymiami Member

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    My daily carry, an old Benchmade Ascent folder in full size has a partially serrated blade and it’s been super useful long term since I’m either on my skiff or towing it up and down the road ( full time fishing guide). My skiff has lots of knives aboard - each one for a particular use - including a brand new never used Griptilian that’s also full sized - and stored on board for use as an emergency back up... But my daily carry still gets a lot of use, plus it’s a last ditch defender if ever needed.

    My daily carry is always on my person since at any moment a line on a skiff can turn into a real hazard whether it’s an anchor line or just the line a cast net is attached to...

    I never even try to sharpen those partial serrations, instead I keep the plain edge portion of the blade good and sharp -knowing I’ve got the serrations for rough work.

    Recently I had to use that daily carry to cut away the hard rubber treads from a blown trailer tire that was was wrapped so tightly around the trailer axle that there was no other way to clear it. After almost 20 to 30 minutes of really hard use... that serrated area is still ready to go...

    For my purposes that partially serrated edge has worked well...
     
  11. dh1633pm

    dh1633pm Member

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    I like half serrated. Work well in the data center for cutting zip ties and cables. Have no idea how to sharpen.
     
  12. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    I never had to sharpen them, I've used knifes for edc for years and they were still sharp. I would think a small diamond file could get in there. It can't cost much of you did send t in to kershaw.
     
  13. Drail

    Drail Member

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    In the Days of Olde we called serrated blades "saws". But then they became "trendy" and now everyone makes them and everybody buys them. I like plain blades honed razor sharp much better. I don't have time to stone between all those serrations. But I'm an old fart......
     
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  14. sparkyv

    sparkyv Member

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    I'm a plain edge guy. It's just too difficult to sharpen the serrated edged blades.
     
  15. Fiv3r

    Fiv3r Member

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    I would not call a serrated edge trendy nor a bandwagon short of a knife designed to be used hard with minimal care. My folks got some modestly priced steak knives when they got married back in '76. They have outlasted their marriage as they have been passed to my wife of 15 years and I have been using the newfangled things since the W administration back in '05 ;)


    I really only prefer them on a steel made for water carry like anything in H1. I have a weekend on the boat planned coming up in a couple days. I really like H1 with full serrations. I find the PE version to be pretty lacking. My new ARK will be aroumd my neck both as a snack opener as well as an emergency blade should anyone get tangled up.
     
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  16. ugaarguy

    ugaarguy Moderator Staff Member

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    You can sharpen a serrated edge nearly as easily as sharpening a plain edge on the Sharpmaker. Old video, but it shows how it's done:


    I'll start another thread where I'll post some pics of cardboard cut with a pair of freshly sharpened Spyderco Native 5 LW folders, one plain edge, one fully serrated. We'll see who can tell which knife cut which piece of cardboard.

    Well, I frequent this forum, and I now EDC a fully serrated folder. I switched to that fully serrated knife after reading the thread on the Spyderco forum that I linked to in my previous post, and giving the knife and the Sharpmaker an honest try over several weeks. The only thing PE does better for me is shaving cigar caps or copy paper more cleanly. However, the PE knives are also thinner blade stock and thinner behind the edge than the serrated Native 5, so that plays a role. There are guys who are better than me at sharpening SE knives, and they're able to get them to paper slicing sharp. I'm not there yet, but I'm working on it.
     
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  17. entropy

    entropy Member

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    They cut stuff. They are a PITA to sharpen. They still cut stuff when not very sharp. My EDC, a Gerber FAST 06, has a half serrated tanto blade. I keep the tanto front part very sharp, and touch up the serrations rarely. They see more use, and usually on boxes, wire, and other misc stuff.
     
  18. HiDive

    HiDive Member

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    Maybe they test them but don't do it for a living. Working on boats and submarines I cut many types of rope, fishing nets, many types of gasket material, fire hose, fishing tackle, fiber glass, deck material, delrin, UHMW, wire on and on every day above water and below. Whatever works for you is fine but a well sharpened plain edge works best for me.
     
  19. Fiv3r

    Fiv3r Member

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    @ugaarguy

    I very much appreciate your point. And yes a sharp maker makes it easy;) my point is that if i am out in the field and my knife edge finds the wrong end of a rock or an old embedded fence staple it will be a lot easier and more likely for me to have a diamond stone in my pocket to work the edge into something razor sharp if its a plain edge over a serrated edge. I know thats a big if and unlikely. Plus, I know me. At base camp im going to have my roll of maintenance tools that can sharpen and repair anything from a small SAK up to a 3lb khukuri and will have every stone and rod to fit the crannies and serrated teeth on a Spyderco, Cold Steel, or Kabar.

    At the end of the day, I dont like sharpening systems. Its a skill I have never gotten the knack for and mechanically sharpening a knife is not something I find enhances my enjoyment of the hobby. When I was 6 years old, I remember watching my grandpa use an oiled stone no bigger than his thumb keep his slip joint razor sharp. Sharp enough to remove a splinter from a little boy's hand with surgical precision. When i got into khukuris about 20 years ago, I learned the value of a mouse pad, sand paper, and a loaded strop. I quickly learned about why a steel is issued to keep an edge popping and why my preferred edge is a convex one.

    I like my serrated knives for what they are. There is a wisdom in them that I think does get glossed over because they do require a different technique and tools than most knives. I think a lot of what they can do, especially in a good quality high end or specialty steel, is the baby thrown out in the bathwater when compared to gas station garbage saws. Its one of the main reasons I was so quick to jump on the serrated ARK in H1.

    That said....I still don't like sharpening them and find it more of a chore than a loving maintenance:evil: Then again, I guess it's not such a rare thing to be curmudgeonly when it comes to what we like. There is a whole board of guys with plastic guns that have guys carrying 3lb 100 year old technology shaking their heads while the wheelgun guys wonder why anyone would put ammo in the bottom of their gun when side loading 5 instead of 6 got the job done back in the day while those practicing the Dark Art of Holy Black pause their front-stuffing and proclaim, "Hold my mead.."

    We all like what we like and I will always find use for a QUALITY serrated edge knife. I'll maintain it....but im not going to like it:rofl:

    edit for grammar
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2020
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  20. sparkyv

    sparkyv Member

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    Yes! I look forward to this.

    Well, this is unexpected. I would have expected your preference for your applications would be serrated. Good to know. Like I said, I'm a plain edge guy, but I don't work on the water.

    I 100% agree:
     
  21. dh1633pm

    dh1633pm Member

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    Nice video, but I don't have one of those. My solution was to send back to Benchmade. I have learned a ton by paying attention to the knife postings. Thanks.
     
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  22. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

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    Nothing new, a sleep away camp I attended as a kid in the 50's used serrated edges on their silverware knives. The quality of the meat they served demanded them. lol
     
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  23. Boattale

    Boattale Member

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    I have a Chicago Cutlery serrated bread knife, just so everybody knows I'm not prejudiced.
     
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  24. Drail

    Drail Member

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  25. 23tony

    23tony Member

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    If you use your plain-edge blade enough and don't sharpen it, you could end up with a serrated blade without intending to. But it may not cut all that well....
     
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