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I have finally joined the ranks of Glock owners....

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Rubber_Duck, Oct 31, 2014.

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  1. Rubber_Duck

    Rubber_Duck Member

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    I've never been a fan of Glocks. Early on in my gun hobby I jumped on the anti-Glock bandwagon, subscribing to and perpetuating such beliefs as "it has the ergonomics of a 2x4" and "they are as stylish as hot, blocky garbage." I did have experience shooting various examples of them and just didn't like them. The grip angle sucks. The trigger is bleh. Where is the safety? And all the Glock fanbois on various boards raving about it being the be-all, end-all of handguns for the zombie apocalypse, just when I was starting to become interested in Glocks, the Gaston kool-aid drinkers would turn me off to them.

    Well, I picked up a Gen 3 Glock 21 with dead night sights and a broken ejector for super cheap. I've installed a new ejector/trigger housing, Meprolight Tru Dot night sights, and mounted a Streamlight TLR-1.

    My 9mm needs are completely satisfied with my SIG Sauer P226 and P228, and I have a Colt Rail Gun and Colt LW Commander so I thought my .45 ACP needs were satisfied as well. But I realize now that the Glock 21 fills a need I didn't realize I had. A low-maintenance double-stack .45.

    The grip angle still sucks. But the more I hold it the more it grows on me and I don't think the grip angle will be a problem once I train myself to angle the pistol lower a little bit to compensate. Otherwise, I can't find any other faults with the design.

    I replaced the ejector/trigger housing easily, and have come to appreciate the simplicity of the Glock design. I've also noticed that I have a tendency to slightly overlube my guns, because I have been shooting AR-15s, SIG Sauer P226/8, and 1911s for years and they like to be run wet. Well, The Glock doesn't have long frame rails to put all the lube like a P226 or a 1911, only four small metal tabs in the frame for the slide to ride on. So I lubricated the barrel very lightly as well as the frame rails in the slide, everything else is pretty much dry. Time will tell how it runs but I don't expect any problems.

    I still need to add an extended slide release and install a magazine extension on one of the mags for nightstand duty.

    Here is the latest addition to the stable and my formal entrance into the world of Glock ownership:
     

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  2. CGRifleman

    CGRifleman Member

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    I love Glock haters, they're almost as much fun to mess with as the HK fanboy club. My personal favorite is when people claim they're inaccurate... I tell them they can fix that by replacing the operator.
    Congrats on your purchase, the G21 is a nice .45, and the TLR is a great addition. I had a 21C a few years ago, but sold it in favor of a Kimber Custom II. They're not perfect, but few guns really are. Currently my G19 Gen3 does just about everything I would use a handgun for.
     
  3. GBExpat

    GBExpat Member

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    Congrats on your new Glock.

    In September I bought my 1st Glock, a 30S. I have found it to be a nice-shooting, comfortable handgun.

    This month I purchased a Gen4 G19. I talked myself into that while I was firing test strings thru the Chrony in my backyard with my only full-size 9x19 pistol that I bought almost 30 years ago, a S&W659. Damned thing weighs 40 ounces, empty. The G19 weighs ~30oz full.

    BTW, the 30S sports a Gen3 frame and the 19 (obviously) a Gen4. IMO, if they all had the Gen4 grip, there would be a LOT more Glock fans. I find the grip on the G19 to be very comfortable.

    One thing that I really like about the Glocks is their simplicity. I can detail-strip one in just a couple of minutes ... detail-strip ... and put them back together in a couple of minutes more. And there is no magic required to put them back together, no special "tricks"/tools to get springs to behave, etc. Sweet! :)
     
  4. Vodoun da Vinci

    Vodoun da Vinci Member

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    Congrats!! :)

    I was a confirmed hater of "plastic pistols" and had a Glock aversion until I shot a G19 and a G26 a couple of years ago. Bought a Gen4 G26 and later a G42 that my Wife simply likes better than any other gun and now we are Glock freaks.

    Not a Fanboy....just realistic about them. They are great tools, no doubt about that.

    VooDoo
     
  5. JRWhit

    JRWhit Member

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    I'm not a fanboy or a hater, but I have to disagree. There is no group more cult like and fun to mess with than the Religious Glock worshipers.

    They are great little pistols. But it is still fun to watched the fallout when you describe it as a slightly improved Highpoint, just to mess with em.

    Congrats on your score.
     
  6. ritepath

    ritepath Member

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    The glockers are the Iphone folks of the gun world. If not for the owners I'd have a 19 and 34 right now.

    I did have a G20 and plan on getting one in the next year.


    But I do love how the 41 shoots.....point and hit so easy. I may have to look into a CZ97 since I picked up a p220 earlier this year.
     
  7. JDGray

    JDGray Member

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    I like Glocks, just a tad under CZs!! Great weapons! Congrats on the good deal:)
     
  8. Fredericianer

    Fredericianer Member

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    Congratulations on your new Glock. I've yet to get one of my own, but I'm a big fan of them.
     
  9. mgmorden

    mgmorden Member

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    Congrats. As a fellow Glock owner I often don't understand the "fervor" surrounding them, but there's no denying that Glocks are very reliable and good guns. I'm sure it will serve you well.
     
  10. agent109

    agent109 member

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    One of the major causes of Glock consternation is the total departure from the Browning design. The Glock pistol does not utilize anything from previously designed pistols. It is totally unique from the ground up. Gaston Glock is a genius who formatted a totally new concept of how an auto loading pistol works and went on to further prove his genius by marketing strategies that were also unique.

    Gaston Glock followed no one but now just about every gun maker is following him and making polymer framed pistols up to and including Browning which has just released a poly framed .380 pistol. It is time to give Gaston Glock the credit his is due as an innovator and the man than changed the gun world forever.
     
  11. mgmorden

    mgmorden Member

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    Glock uses the same tilting barrel design Browning did. There are indeed some guns that have deviated from that (CZ-52 with their roller cam system, the Beretta 92 with their locking block, etc), but Glock's lockup is completely Browning in origin.

    H&K pioneered striker-fired guns using polymer frames a bit earlier with the VP-70.

    Yes, Glock's are good guns and their marketing was indeed brilliant, but they just as derivative from previous designs as any other gun.
     
  12. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    Uh...lolwut?

    John Browning's fingerprints are all over it. So are Dieudonne Saive's and Hugo Borchardt's and Georg Luger's and whoever the engineer(s)was/were who pioneered plastic injection molded frames at Heckler & Koch.

    It's basically a compilation of the ideas of many who came before him. He just put all of it into a single pistol.

    Oh, wait. He did put the "safety" on the trigger...and fixed it to disengage in the same direction as the trigger moves to fire the gun. That was unique...and memorable for too many.

    And that one is copied from Karl Walther's P38.
     
  13. Wanderling

    Wanderling Member

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    2OP: Congrats, now you're hooked.
     
  14. TomJ
    • Contributing Member

    TomJ Contributing Member

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    I wound up with 3. For me, the grip and the grip angle are not as comfortable as other guns I have, but I shoot them as well as anything else I own and they are reliable. I'm not sure I can ask for more from a SD gun than to be reliable and accurate.
     
  15. LockedBreech

    LockedBreech Member

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    Incorrect, sir. The Glock uses a modified Browning locking system.

    Glock also was the first commercially successful polymer framed gun, but HK had a polymer framed gun first.

    I like Glock, but it definitely builds on pre-existing design.
     
  16. agent109

    agent109 member

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    No it does not! Browning used a tilting barrel set on a hinged link with a pin that turns. Glock slides the barrel down a ramp. Not even close. There is nothing in a 1911 that is even close to a Glock unique design. There are no Browning Finger Prints on a Glock, that is a self serving myth only!
     
  17. agent109

    agent109 member

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    Once again totally false. The Browning breech lock is a tongue and groove set up in the slide. Glock uses and an external barrel block insert into a machined cut square opening in the slide. Not even close. I do believe that locked breech was developed by Luger long before Browning as well.
     
  18. LockedBreech

    LockedBreech Member

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    I respectfully suggest you do some further research. The external barrel block insert that locks the breech is an evolution/modification of Browning's design principles. Nearly every modern handgun uses some sort of derivative of that system, Glock included.

    http://rkba.org/guns/principles/operating-systems/short-recoil.html ("Linear or tilting locking motions rather than bore-axial rotary locking could perhaps be said to be one trademark of Browning designs.")

    And yes, Luger played a role. Both he and Browning played major roles that Glock built upon. You also didn't respond to the bit about HK polymers predating Glock polymers.

    Glocks are great, but Glock didn't revolutionize gun design. Rather, he successfully combined and evolved several elements of predecessor designs to revolutionize gun manufacture, marketing, and distribution. Still a very impressive feat, but not the one you're claiming. :)
     
  19. agent109

    agent109 member

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    Gaston Glock was a curtain rod manufacturer who already knew that polymer and nickel plated stamped parts have a natural lubricity when rubbed together. For a non gun designer to become the worlds leading and largest gun maker and seller is a monumental quantum leap away from Browning.
     
  20. LockedBreech

    LockedBreech Member

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    Again, Glocks commercial success has never been disputed. He orchestrated an impressive coup in the gun market. However, his design credentials are barely a footnote compared to Browning's achievements. Browning was the mind behind a massive number of firearm innovations.

    "[Browning] is regarded as one of the most successful firearms designers of the 20th century, in the development of modern automatic and semi-automatic firearms, and is credited with 128 gun patents."
    - American Society of Mechanical Engineers

    "Browning influenced nearly all categories of firearms design. He invented or made significant improvements to single-shot, lever-action, and slide-action, rifles and shotguns. His most significant contributions were arguably in the area of autoloading firearms. He developed the first autoloading pistols that were both reliable and compact by inventing the telescoping bolt, integrating the bolt and barrel shroud into what is known as the pistol slide. Browning's telescoping bolt design is now found on nearly every modern semi-automatic pistol, as well as several modern fully automatic weapons. He also developed the first gas-operated machine gun, the Colt-Browning Model 1895—a system that surpassed mechanical recoil operation to become the standard for most high-power self-loading firearm designs worldwide. Browning also made significant contributions to automatic cannon development.

    Browning's most successful designs include the M1911 pistol, the Browning Hi Power pistol, the Browning .50 caliber machine gun, the Browning Automatic Rifle, and the Browning Auto-5, a ground-breaking semi-automatic shotgun. These arms are nearly identical today to those assembled by Browning, with only minor changes in detail and cosmetics. Even today, John Browning's guns are still some of the most copied guns in the world."
    - Wiki (citing multiple sources)
     
  21. agent109

    agent109 member

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    Gaston Glock is the world leader in polymer guns that everyone now is emulating. I don't think that was an accident and H&K had their chance and failed at it!
     
  22. LockedBreech

    LockedBreech Member

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    ZERO argument with anything there. I totally agree with this. But that's not what you said, you said that the Glock was a totally unique design that didn't borrow from anything before it, and that's just not true. :)
     
  23. agent109

    agent109 member

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    The fact remains that Glock has sold more guns of his design than anyone else in history! Glock has earned a reputation of repeatable reliability second to non. Great Britain just scrapped all their Browning Hi Powers and rearmed their military with Glock 17 9 mm pistols.

    That is a little tough to ignore!
     
  24. LockedBreech

    LockedBreech Member

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    Glocks ~10 million sales figure is very impressive, but is tiny compared to the number of Browning designs sold and still used. Don't forget that Glock only makes handguns, whereas Browning designs included handguns, machine guns, and long arms.

    One could even point out that since Glock uses a Browning-derived locking system, those 10 million Glock sales themselves also count partially as Browning sales.
     
  25. agent109

    agent109 member

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    I say it is just pull apart a 1911 or any other design prior to Glock and show me the similarities! Where are they?
     
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