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i HAVE HEARD THIS CALLED A "SLUG GUN", BUT KNOW NOTHING ELSE ABOUT IT

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by "DOC", Feb 12, 2018.

  1. "DOC"

    "DOC" Member

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    Belongs to a friend of mine. It is a VERY heavy piece, probably 50-60 lbs. Octagon rifled barrel with G R Douglas on the top rear under the long plate. Under hammer ignition. 60" overall length. 43.5" barrel. Hooded front sight. Guessing the plate screwed into the top rear of the barrel is some kind of scope mount? It also is stamped .50 Caliber on the top rear of the barrel. Any information will be greatly appreciated. Also trying to get some idea of the value as it is going to be for sale . I have tried everything I know to upload several photos, but have not been successful. I can email or send photos to a cell phone number if that would help.
     
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  2. Sistema1927

    Sistema1927 Member

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    Slug gun?

    Sure it isn't a "Punt Gun" at 50-60 lbs.?
     
  3. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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  4. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    You do know it is modern, don't you ? Douglas barrels of all types are well known.
    A local gunsmith builds ultra heavy benchrest muzzleloaders like that.
    I was surprised that they shoot benchrest with patched round balls, all I knew of in the category was the "slug gun" firing a heavy paper patched bullet.
    But his favorite NMLRA match calls for round balls. He loads his with Teflon coated denim patches.
    They have some strange rules on sights, "open" sights are required but are otherwise unrestricted. He has Redfield Internationals with slotted plates instead of peep apertures. Sounds like your guy's gun is missing the rear sight.
     
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  5. boom boom

    boom boom Member

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    That is just strange. Knew benchresters were wild and crazy but I never knew this secret about them.
     
  6. "DOC"

    "DOC" Member

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  7. "DOC"

    "DOC" Member

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    I was guessing the 1940's or 1950's, but being as I know nothing more about it than what y'all have told me, it's still just a guess. I did finally manage to figure out how to post some photos, but the one of the entire rifle wouldn't upload.
     
  8. "DOC"

    "DOC" Member

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    This is actually a rifled barrel. Are punt guns the same as those super sized 2 and 4 guage bow guns for geese hunting?
     
  9. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    Yeah. most of the punt guns were smooth bore, and had single-digit bores, and typically launched fine silk bags of ordinary shot in great clouds. Used for "market" hunting, back in the day.

    Yours is for sure unique. The trigger guard is the mainspring, it looks to me. Which is neat, but you have to rely on crimping the cap on the nipple stuck up there on the bottom of that monster.

    That bar with the sight is also a puzzler. Scopes were not common in percussion cap days. So, I wonder if that aft hole is for an aperture sight that is now long gone.
     
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  10. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Underhammer actions were and are popular for target and bench rifles. Mechanically simple and a direct flash into the powder. Very late rifles had primer adapters.
    The long bar to the rear is undoubtedly for a peep sight.
     
  11. "DOC"

    "DOC" Member

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    Maybe chunk guns and slug guns are different names for the same guns or describe the particular sport with similar guns,I don't know, but there are more pictures of similar guns when Googling "chunk gun". The Billinghurst rifles are very close to what my friend has. The research continues................
     
  12. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    No.
    The chunk gun is a heavy but rustic rifle meant for "shooting over a log" at moderate ranges.
    The slug gun was the highest refinement of the muzzleloading benchrest rifle. Calibers were large, rifling was relatively quick, and bullets were long and heavy. The projectiles were cast to rough shape and then swaged to eliminate voids and get exact diameter and nose profile. Many were made in two parts and swaged together to give desired hardness for bearing surface (under a paper patch) and nose.
     
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  13. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Just a WAG, but I suspect the Douglas barrel was a takeoff from another gun, put on someone's idea of a home made bench rest muzzle loader.

    Jim
     
  14. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    And what gun would you take a .50 cal 1 1/2" across the flats off of?
     
  15. "DOC"

    "DOC" Member

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    The piece doesn't look homemade to me...except for the Douglas barrel it closely resembles Billinghurst guns I have seen pictures of.
     

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