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I won this Krag - question about handguard

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by Bullseye, May 16, 2017.

  1. AlexanderA

    AlexanderA Member

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    I could have sworn from the picture that the last digit of the model number was a "4." Anyway, the stock is not an 1898 since it has the early bevel around the bolt handle. I'm anxious to see the more detailed pictures.
     
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  2. Dog Soldier
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    Dog Soldier Member

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    I prefer the .303 Brit brass for reloading. It has a thicker rim allowing a better lock up. These are a couple of early 19th century Cavalry fire arms. The Saddle Ring Krag and the C-96. Mauser 7.63 x 25. ;)

    IMG_0938[278].jpg
     
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  3. Bullseye
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    Bullseye Member

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    Okee doke ... I cleaned it up, the rifling is there but not strong, there are no pits inside the barrel. The bolt looks pretty good. I can't get the single shot selector to move. The stock was cracked badly. There are no cartouches or other markings on the stock visible, so I suppose if it is a good working rifle, a reproduction stock is probably the least expensive ( but not cheap ) conversion to get it back to closest I can to whatever this is supposed to be. It appears it is repaired bubba style with glass bedding material and I don't even think it cured right or was cleaned up.
    If it holds, well then it is what it is or if it's worth restoring further, I might restock it with a repro.
    The barrel measures 21 and 1/4 inches roughly from the point where it meets the receiver. How far in it goes, I don't know.
    It is not a 1898 .... It is a 1896 I think. That's what it looks like to me upon a close up photo below. The serial number looks to be 95101.
    That wood handguard section I am missing would measure roughly 8 and 3/4 inches. If the rear sight is not where it's supposed to be, then I have another issue. Here's a bunch of images I took tonight.
    That one near the bayonet lug where the wood looks silver is a strange thing why it looks silver. It looks like walnut wood to me without a camera. I don't know why it did that unless the oil I used is reflecting that way?

    I hope that I have not wasted anyones time. I have mixed feelings. I keep beating myself up over the stock. ( Like I cracked it beating myself ) for not seeing such an obvious problem. I didn't have my glasses on and the rifles was not in great light. This repair shown is enhanced some with the flash. It really jumps out with the camera and doesn't look as bad as the pictures but it's there.

    I do reload for Krag. Usually I shoot round nose cast gas checked bullets. I like my pet load with my sporterized Krag that I have.

    krag1.JPG

    krag3.JPG

    krag4.JPG

    krag5.JPG

    krag6.JPG

    krag7.JPG

    krag8.JPG

    krag9.JPG

    krag9b.JPG
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2017
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  4. Bullseye
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    Bullseye Member

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    krag2.JPG

    krag9c.JPG

    krag9d.JPG

    krag9e.JPG

    :mad: How did I miss this CRACK! ???
     
  5. AlexanderA

    AlexanderA Member

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    I think the crack in the stock can be made to look a lot better, with careful sanding, filling, and staining. It's an 1896 stock, to match the receiver. The rear sight, however, is the early M1892 / 94 version. It has the same footprint as the M1896 sight. The correct handguard is the long one, that covers the receiver ring. Adding the handguard would improve the looks of the rifle a lot.

    I see that it has an additional tapped hole (with a filler screw) in the barrel behind the rear sight. This tells me that at one time it had one of the longer sights, such as the M1898, M1901, or M1902. (This hole would be covered up by the handguard.) This supports my theory that the handguard went missing when the sight was changed.

    You should get the 3-piece jointed cleaning rod, and the chrome-plated oiler, to fit in the buttstock. Also, the proper sling.

    The shortening of the barrel, and the installation of the M1905 Springfield front sight, was well done. This was probably an armory alteration.
     
  6. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    The question is, whose armory?
    It is not the detail configuration of the PC (Girard College) it resembles and I have never heard of another government short rifle conversion.
     
  7. Bullseye
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    Bullseye Member

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    I am still wondering if I got the handguard figured out. From what I think I learned from you guys, I need the very top one on this page.
    http://partsforantiqueguns.com/Krag (Springfield) Upper Handguards.htm

    I have been having a exhausting but very good day. The coin sale went well. Not fantastic but I didn't take a beating at all.
    Then when I finally had a chance to get on here, I have a message from one of my very most favorite people on this forum who is going to hook me up with a stock for a song. I don't know which song I'll have to sing, but I will polish up on my Marty Robbins and Johnny Cash repertoire in the shower in the morning.
     
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  8. AlexanderA

    AlexanderA Member

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    Yes, that's right. Notice that it extends rearward to cover the receiver ring. That's a characteristic of the Model 1896.

    Honestly, I don't think you should replace the stock. Somebody went to a lot of trouble to shorten it, and they did a good job. What are you going to do, chop another perfectly good stock? Regarding the crack, what I would do is remove the epoxy to a depth of about 1/8" and fill it with melted stick shellac, colored to match the rest of the wood. (It's applied with a hot spatula and sanded flush when hardened.) This is the way restorations were done years ago. If you do this right, you will hardly be able to see the repair.
    http://homeguides.sfgate.com/use-shellac-stick-99395.html
    http://shop.brownells.com/gunsmith-...-080-528-025&gclid=CJ6S9L-GgNQCFRRMDQodQdkGGQ
     
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  9. Bullseye
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    Bullseye Member

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    I am not ruining a perfectly good stock, I'm upgrading my rifle, thanks to my good friend who is sending it to me as a gift for this purpose.
    This will be a very special rifle to me because of his generosity. I couldn't be happier just because of that. It will look very nice when I get it finished.
     
  10. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Did no one notice the big chunk of wood missing from behind the magazine on the right side? That stock is not just cut down, it is ruined. It might be fixed, but the guy who could do that right would charge more than you paid for the gun. Sorry, but it is just another one of many thousands of Krags that were fiirst "sporterized" (they were all of $1.50 from DCM in the 1920's) and then "restored" by someone with a bunch of scrap parts but no clue as to what an original Krag looks like.

    Jim
     

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