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I would like a small revolver

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Orkanen, Oct 7, 2019.

  1. Tallball

    Tallball Member

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    I have not liked the two Ruger SP101's that I have owned. Their triggers were not good. I was told they aren't easy to lighten.

    Of my many snub revolvers, my 2" S&W Model 10 made in 1961 or so is easily the most accurate. I'm not sure if it fits the size and weight requirements. Mine has an excellent trigger, and I know that their triggers can be worked on.
     
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  2. Orkanen

    Orkanen Member

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    I take it many Americans don't find much use for a .22 LR. You can't hunt with it and you can barely defend yourself with it. Its only advantage is cheaper ammo. Reloading any center fire ammo here starts at quadruple the price. 6 times .22 price and you get the cheapest center fire ammo available. That said, I've been told that there's less recoil in .32 than in .22 Standard, so I've been collecting, cleaning and priming .32 shells for a while. If I get myself a .22 or .38 instead of a .32, I'll just sell them at shell and primer price.
    As long as I'm able to reasonably adjust the trigger weight and get a smooth pull, all is fine. I found a new one here. Let's see if I can test one somewhere.
    It certainly does. Thanks for all the links.
    And I thought it was just a matter of replacing the hammer spring with a lighter one and polishing slide areas. A quick browse through the Norwegian version of Brownells gave me a set of several springs. I take it you never tried.
    I got to test an old 10 in small revolver competition two years back. Owner was far from impressed with my results, but I had lots of fun, which is the most important part.
     
  3. bearcreek

    bearcreek Member

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    I'm not a revolver guy so can't help you much there. Just want to say that I'm impressed that they have 70 meter shots in a competition with snubby revolvers there. Nice. Lot of folks carrying handguns here in the US think that 25 yards is a long shot, even with a full or mid size semi auto.
     
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  4. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Sorry to tell you but it's not the guns that are not accurate out last 15 feet. Practice your trigger control.
     
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  5. Orkanen

    Orkanen Member

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    Double action revolvers are more difficult to handle than semi automatics and single action revolvers are slower, making them more fun to play with. Not mentioning percussion revolvers. No, I don't own one. Yet.
    Don't forget the time frame of down to 6 seconds. There's also a target spread of up to 60°, both vertically and horizontally. If it wasn't difficult, it wouldn't be fun.

    Oh, we shoot up to 200 m with full magnum loads, but with more time on our hands. Same competition, just different weapon.
     
  6. Orkanen

    Orkanen Member

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    I forgot to mention. We also shoot small pistols with sizes up to 185 x 125 x 35 mm and weight up to 800 g.
     
  7. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Not at all. I like shooting a .22 most and I use .22s for squirrel hunting and varmint removal. The .22lr is a great cartridge and I have both handguns and rifles in .22lr. I would not be without them.

    There is a major competition dedicated to the .22lr, it's the Ruger Rimfire Challenge. It's a super fun match.
     
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  8. Orkanen

    Orkanen Member

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    Then I take it you know how far down you can adjust the trigger weight on a .22 LR and which cartridges work best on tuned revolvers?

    I had a nice chat with the club foreman an hour ago. He let me know that there's no limit to target spread in competitions as long as there's enough room between participants and safety is upheld. He also told me that in order to participate in Scandinavian competitions, one is required to be a member of a Scandinavian club and having attended to and passed an approved safety course.
     
  9. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Sorry, I have not had work done to the trigger on my 22s. The revolver is single action and the semi-autos have good triggers already.
     
  10. Apuesto

    Apuesto member

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    Imagine that ...
     
  11. WheelGunMan

    WheelGunMan Member

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    The LCR model has an internal hammer and is only available in 1-7/8" (48 mm) barrel lengths... whereas the the LCRx has an exposed hammer and is available in both 1-7/8" (48 mm) and 3" (76 mm) barrel lengths in a variety of calibers. I recommended the LCRx 3 inch .357 caliber because it offers adjustable rear sights which are not available on the 1-7/8" models and a stainless steel frame and cylinder thus giving it a little extra weight (21 oz/595 g) that really helps tames recoil. Especially when shooting .38 Spcl as it allows you to get back on target quickly, which pays high dividends when involved in competitions. I picked one up this past summer and have been practicing with it and plan on using it in competitive shooting next year.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019
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  12. WheelGunMan

    WheelGunMan Member

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    Actually they are relatively easy to lighten. In my spurless SP101 I changed to a 10# hammer spring coupled with the 8# trigger spring. Also installed a set of hammer shims in less than an hour. That included taking a drill bit and cleaning the trigger spring tunnel by hand turning it to clean out left over manufacturing debris. The trigger now is light and glass smooth.
     
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  13. Pat Riot

    Pat Riot Member

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    If I read that website correctly it looks like an S&W 63 will cost about $1,200 (USD), correct?

    I am not really sure how to adjust trigger pull weight in that revolver but I am sure it will be smooth. All my Smith & Wesson revolvers have a very nice trigger pull with no adjustments.
     
  14. Tallball

    Tallball Member

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    Thank you for correcting me on possible SP101 trigger improvement. Apparently what a friend told me about it was completely incorrect.

    When I have the time and energy I will change out the springs on my 4" 327.
     
  15. Orkanen

    Orkanen Member

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    My bad. I'll see if I can find it here somewhere. Not all models are available here in Norway.
    Something like that, yes. Some things are quite dear here. Other things are just downright expensive.
    There are usually 2 or more springs in any revolver trigger mechanism. One for the cylinder stop and the other for the hammer. Ignore the cylinder stop. There may also be a trigger spring, but many revolvers don't have them, as the trigger is usually linked to the hammer in some manner. One simply reduces trigger weight by reducing the force of the hammer spring. In some instances, by replacing the spring, in others, adjusting a spring tightening screw. The drawback is that the hammer impact force is also reduced, demanding softer primers. Since there are 2 adjustment screws in my MR-73, I can turn down the hammer weight screw so much the hammer doesn't ignite anything, and I can turn down the trigger spring so the trigger doesn't return upon release.

    Do rimfire cartridge brands vary in softness? If so, I'd like to know which ones are the softer, making the .22 a more viable option.
     
  16. drobs

    drobs Member

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    Last edited: Oct 12, 2019
  17. Pat Riot

    Pat Riot Member

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    Haha :)...yes, I know about spring replacement or reducing spring tension by modifying the spring. I was thinking ore along the lines of the old S&W trigger spring tension screws. ;)

    I have never heard of .22 ammo having a comparison done regarding “softest” to ignite the primer. I have heard of and experienced misfires while shooting cheap or questionable .22 ammo that wouldn’t fire. I would think that going with quality ammo that primer strike, in regards to the round itself, should not be an issue if the firing pin strikes it with adequate force.
    If you are shooting out to 70 meters I would be more concerned with accuracy.

    Here’s a piece of advice I give to all new Cowboy Action and tactical shooters that I meet; “Shoot the gun the way the factory made it. Get to know the gun. After a few hundred rounds then think about what the gun might need or what you need more practice doing.”

    This is a conversation in another forum about the trigger pull of a S&W model 63.
    http://smith-wessonforum.com/s-w-revolvers-1980-present/405470-new-model-63-dont-like-trigger.html
    I hope this is okay with the Moderators...

    I have 3 J-Frame revolvers. All three had slightly rough trigger pulls when new. After a couple of hundred rounds they smoothed out and felt lighter but I did not actually test their trigger pull with a scale.
     
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  18. rwilky78

    rwilky78 Member

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    Exactly what I did to mine. Along with some minor polishing. Very smooth.
     
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  19. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Actually the S&W site lists a price of $769 US. I'm not sure where you got that $1200 price. Online the price is under $650 USD.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2019
  20. Pat Riot

    Pat Riot Member

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    :) You are correct. The $1200 comes from the link he posted that had the price in Norway at 11,795 Krona, I believe. That equates to just under $1,200 (USD).
     
  21. Orkanen

    Orkanen Member

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    I use CCI Standard for practice and Aguila Match Pistol for events, believing the latter are more uniform. Both used in my Pardini Sp22. Aguila seem to drop around 20 - 30 cm at 70 m, being slightly weaker than CCIs. There are several other brands available here, like Winchester, Geco, Magtech and more. Don't think I've ever found cheap ammo here. I pay a minimum of NOK 350,- for a box of 500 CCI Standard.
    I admit I played with both springs in my MR-73 before it was fully "run in", it being rather heavy to begin with. It's getting better and better every day, also thanks to lots and lots of dry firing. I have however never touched the sights. No need. A mate bought himself a brand new Hämmerli Xesse with shortened barrel for use in small pistol category. He later modified the slide spring several times for some unknown reason, and now it requires CCI Mini-Mag to reload.
    I assume I'll have to find a well used one to find out if I like it or not, doubts have begun to arise.
    Every new revolver I've tried so far have been both rough and heavy. I also got to play with a pretty well used Walther P22, measuring the trigger weight to 2.4 kg. Ever tried hitting something with a gun that doesn't even remotely fit your hand, and one with a heavy trigger to boot?
    This is the price tag he was referring to, linking to a website in Norway, which is why I in a former post wrote that some things are quite dear here. Other things are just downright expensive. Of course S&W are a lot cheaper in America.
     
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  22. Armybrat

    Armybrat Member

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    The S&W Model 34 (.22 lr) would be an excellent choice. I gave mine to my grandson 10 years ago.

    C1B1336D-BC59-4BF2-9854-E72BDB6401F8.jpeg
     
  23. Orkanen

    Orkanen Member

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    I am, and very much so. Hunters House in Denmark is a well known shop among gun toting Norwegians. Another thread brought my attention to a Polish 9 mm pistol I'll be willing to examine for use in "military class" competition. I mentioned this to some Polish friends, incidentally owning a house an hours drive away from the factory. I do find it peculiar though, you pointing at the S&W 66 and not the MR-73 presently for sale there, being 199 mm long and perfect, not to mention, a far better revolver.
     
  24. Orkanen

    Orkanen Member

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    It seems tuning the trigger on .22 revolvers to my preferrences, according to people I believe know what they're talking about, is somewhat tricky, perhaps even impossible. Chances are, .32 or .38S are better options.
     
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  25. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Oh boy! That is one back of a markup. I'm lucky to be in the same country as S&W...
     
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