Identify this revolver by the lockwork picture.

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by unclenunzie, Feb 9, 2022.

  1. Monac

    Monac Member

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    I did not recognize it, even though I have a Rossi Model 89 (same as the 88 but 6 shot 32 Long) with a three inch barrel. I got the same Pachmayrs as unclenunzie did, and it's a good shooter.

    I've never taken the sideplate off, because I decided to stop doing that after screwing up two revolvers in a row that way. They were an EIG Miroku 38 Special (the cylinder latch spring got away, although it kinda-sorta still works) and a late-production RG 38 Special (trigger return spring flew the coop). I think they both had left-hand sideplates, instead of right-hand ones like this Rossi, so I'm going to blame it on that. :thumbup:
     
  2. unclenunzie
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    unclenunzie Contributing Member

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    Left hand side plates :)

    When I detail stripped my 88 I had to decide if the ejector rod was left or right threaded. Eventually I figured out it is right hand threaded. I wasn't sure how much torque to apply, ejector rod in a padded vise and twisting on the cylinder (with fired cases in place to prevent damage to ejector).

    The first time I ever removed a side plate was from my 686-6 about 11 years ago. The hammer block fell out (of course) and I thought OMG I broke my 686!

    For anyone who wants to peek under the covers never, ever pry or poke. Remove the grips, remove the screws (use proper fitting screwdriver only), and tap the exposed grip gently with a non marring tool like a plastic screwdriver handle. The side plate will vibrate itself off without damage. Keep a finger loosely on the side plate so it doesn't fall except onto a nice soft surface.
     
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  3. Jonesy814

    Jonesy814 Member

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    It is very similar to the S&W internal works with the use of a rebound slide
     
  4. lee n. field

    lee n. field Member

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    Older Taurus-s had that too. They haven't always used a transfer bar.
     
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  5. armoredman

    armoredman Member

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    Nice little snub. I heard the older 88/885s had a habit of breaking firing pins,. any ideas about that? Can it use a Smith "hammer nose" if need be? I think these have been out of print for a few decades. Buddy of mine has one.
     
  6. unclenunzie
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    unclenunzie Contributing Member

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    I saw a thread someplace where a person used an S&W firing pin but it had to be modified to fit. I don't know enough to comment on the quality of M88 firing pins, except on my sample it seems original and it (still?) works, unknown round count.
     
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  7. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Nothing made by Smith and Wesson.

    The only S&W revolvers I am aware of that use a coil mainspring are the J Frames. But that just does not look like a J Frame lockwork to me.

    I am pretty sure I have a photo of a J frame lockwork on my hard drive somewhere, but I am having trouble finding it right now.

    The rebound slide looks all wrong for a J Frame Smith too.

    If I find the photo of the lockwork of a J frame I will post it.
     
  8. PzGren

    PzGren Member

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    Taurus M86 Targetmaster
    aTaurus.jpg

    S&W K Frame
    a-SW-lockwork.jpg

    Sauer & Son Trophy
    a-S-S-Trophy.jpg

    MR73
    aMR73.jpg

    Korth Combat .357
    a-Korth-inside.jpg

    Colt OMM
    a-Colt-OMM.jpg

    Swiss 1882/29 7,5 Swiss
    Swiss.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2022
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  9. Archie

    Archie Member

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    I'm late to the party, so the answer has already been published.
    I would not have been able to identify the revolver correctly. The internal workings follow the Smith & Wesson (with the hammer block missing, as mentioned). The only S&W revolver with coil spring is the (old) Chief's Special, Model 36 and the variants thereof. The rear of the grip frame rule out the Bodyguard or Centennial version. But the spur (thumb cocking part) didn't look right. S&W hammers are either flat on the sides or the wide pad ones are shaped a bit more 'smoothly'.

    So all I could tell was it was a imitation - copy - of a S&W revolver of the five shot J frame family. Too many copies for me to remember them all.
     
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