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I'm in Singapore right now..

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by twoblink, Jan 12, 2003.

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  1. twoblink

    twoblink Member

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    I can tell you right now, the cleanest airport I have ever been to... The buildings are all brightly painted, and everything is relatively clean; people smoke eccessively here...

    I'm staying with my penpal...

    Brave New World and 1984 was describing Singapore..

    Communism only WISHED it imposed this many laws..
     
  2. Sisco

    Sisco Member

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    Singapore was the only place the USN took me where I was paraniod of breaking some obscure law like dropping a gum wrapper.
     
  3. El Tejon

    El Tejon Member

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    Good luck, Winston!
     
  4. Coronach

    Coronach Moderator Emeritus

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    Hey, Twoblink, I recommend that you don't spraypaint cars while you're there.

    Mike :)
     
  5. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    My buddy went there right after college. He says Uzi armed cops were watching the luggage. No luggage theft problem in the '80s. Anybody watching luggage now twoblink?
     
  6. BerettaNut92

    BerettaNut92 Member

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    Last time I tried vising Singapore, they made me turn around, because I was on the list of prohibited items. I was surprised they even let me on the plane.
     
  7. Bruce H

    Bruce H Member

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    I was there twice when the now gone Raffles Hotel was a very nice watering hole. Had a great time both times I was there. Respect the local customs and rules and very little will happen to you.
     
  8. Inoxmark

    Inoxmark Member

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    They have garbage cans with ashtrays on the sidewalks every 100 feet. They actually help you NOT to break the law. If they fine my ignorant a** for still throwing cigarette butts on the ground I fully deserve it.
     
  9. Uncle Ethan

    Uncle Ethan Member

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    twoblink

    It would be facinating to have threads opened up by you regarding some of the laws they enforce rigidly and how they affect the freedoms and happines of the citizens. Good luck and have a fun time- drink a "sling' for me.
     
  10. BerettaNut92

    BerettaNut92 Member

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    Does your penpal like guns?
     
  11. Sisco

    Sisco Member

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    Are you implying that drunken sailors would intentionally break laws? :D
    I guess the point I was trying to make is that Singapore, like any country, has laws and customs one shoud make himself aware of before visiting. Mundane acts (good or bad) that are socially accepted here could land you in court there.
     
  12. stellarpod

    stellarpod Member

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    Sisco said:

    Actually, unless things have changed, it's actually against the law there to CHEW GUM - no joke. :uhoh:

    stellarpod
     
  13. Lord Grey Boots

    Lord Grey Boots Member

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    A friend of mine who was in Singapore for 6 months for work described it as spending all your time in a big shopping mall.
     
  14. alan

    alan Member

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    Don't forget to flush the urinal either.
     
  15. Bruce in West Oz

    Bruce in West Oz Member

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    WOT?? You have to flush three times??? :p

    Singapore is a very popular holiday destination for us here in Australia. Shopping used to be really good in terms of prices, but the fall of the Aussie dollar (Singapore and Oz now achieve parity, roughly) has lessened the attraction somewhat.

    The "rules" aren't all that odious unless you are a criminal .......
     
  16. Farmed Ship

    Farmed Ship Member

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    It's a freakingly suffocating dictatorship, with
    no political freedoms.
    Shopping was real good too in the XSSR
    for the foreigners.
     
  17. dleong

    dleong Member

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    Just for kicks, ask a local there how much cars and houses cost. Remember to pick your jaw up from the ground after you hear the answer...


    DL
    (A Singaporean living abroad)
     
  18. 4thHorseman

    4thHorseman Member

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    I was in the USN when I was there. It was one of the nicest places I've ever been. I loved it. Ofcourse, I may of viewed it differently 20 years ago and from a sailor's viewpoint.:D
     
  19. Inoxmark

    Inoxmark Member

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    I also heard that chewing gum was verbotten in Singapore. But then when I was there in Sept 2001 they were filming a chewing gum commercial in the middle of that wide sidewalk on Orchard Street. Bunch of hip-looking dancing teenagers. At the conclusion of dancing they would throw right hand forward while holding a pack of chewing gum in the hand. They did a few takes.

    Come to think of it, it may have been a commercial AGAINST chewing gum, I don't know. :confused:
     
  20. labgrade

    labgrade Member In Memoriam

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    I got to go play in Singapore on a business $ account.

    No place better for the food, IMNSHO.

    I had an absolute hoot there. Finest food, clean livin' (nothing I don't have here), but on an expense account. No worries, mate.

    The Wife too later & had a totally different take on the place.

    She thought it to be an oppressive ditactorship.

    Our following conversation went something like this.

    The Wife: :barf: dictatorship

    Me: Yes, Honey, but so are we. Only difference is they enforce their laws, we don't.

    & truly Singapore has some pretty draconian laws, but so do we. Only real difference is we just enforce them as we see fit, when we choose.

    We be so laid back. ;)
     
  21. twoblink

    twoblink Member

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    We are taking an "Oleg Poster Tour" :D

    Yep, she's very cool about guns, she said if she moved to the states, she'd buy one!! I have cool penpals.

    As far as Singapore; it's SimCity. Everything here is STERILE... I'm talking EVERYTHING...

    I am the happiest person in Singapore; the natives, they ... I don't know, are afraid of being caned if they are too happy or something (you know, thought police; that's why I have my tin foil hat on)

    The amount of laws that you will be fined for etc... is incredible.. But despite it all, everybody breaks quite a bit of laws when the cops aren't around, which goes to show, laws don't do squat...

    The food is great and very cheap; some of the best I've tasted, on par with Thailand and Taiwan definitely.

    I have been giggling all day... The laws as told to me by my host are too funny...

    Chewing gun is not illegal; GUM ITSELF is illegal..

    The Raffles Hotel is still around, the Westin is the one you are thinking of...

    It's a concrete jungle, and all the buildings are sterile white.. There are "big brother" signs everywhere... Things like "Treat this toilet as your own", "There is a Red Light Camera coming up so don't speed" they tell you about the laws you are about to break in hopes you don't break it.

    Singapore is a jail without walls. They regulate who can own property and how much you can own. They regulate EVERYTHING...

    So far, 2 days down, and 2 to go, and I have not been caned (yet). From personal count, I have broken about 4 dozen laws today alone...

    What cracks me up is there is a "Ministry" of everything. Ministry of environment, ministry of sewage, ministry of education, ministry of restrooms... ministry of everything...:cuss:

    My theory is, the senior minister sits and plays SimCity, and applies it the next day to Singapore... Either that, or 1984 or BNW..

    Huxley would be Singaporean if he were alive today...

    If you have a dental problem, they will prescribe gum to you.. but chances are, the dentist won't really care enough to give them to you...

    Me and the Merlion, we became good buddies today...
     
  22. matis

    matis Member

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    I used to live in the USA; now I find myself in th
    At least they TELL you what the laws are...

    Here we're going to ex-post facto law, as with political correctness and hate speech on campus -- and in this piece by Fred Reed:


    And Vindictiveness For All Evening The Score In The Evening Of Society


    The creeping lunacy creeps on, creepishly. It gives life a constancy comforting in an uncertain world. For this we should be grateful.

    In the GreeleyTribune* of northern Colorado I see that Mitch Muller, a boy of thirteen, has been expelled from school for a year. Yep. Gone.

    You might surmise that he committed some grave crime, that he assaulted a teacher perhaps or was discovered to be selling bulk-lot cocaine. No. He played with a small laser pointer-the sort that projects a red dot onto maps during lectures. It was, said the depressing drones who run the school, a "gun facsimile."

    This is fascinating, like a rare and aggressive tumor. Let us think about it.

    To begin, there is no substance to the charge. A laser pointer does not look like a gun, no more so than a ball-point pen or a lipstick tube. It isn't a weapon, doesn't look like a weapon, and is not intimidating, being less dangerous than, say, a fist.

    Further, note that we are not confronted by a somewhat overzealous application of a reasonable rule. If young Muller had disrupted class and gotten tossed for a week, that would have excessive but not absurd. (Excessive because unnecessary: When you have a male principal who has not been administratively neutered, he says, "Bobby, stop that. Now." That's all he says.)

    The child was suspended for a year, not for misbehavior but for possession of a legal and harmless object that was determined ex post facto to be gunlike. You see. Crimes carry harsh penalties, but you cannot tell what things are crimes until after you have committed them. That is, the authorities can find you guilty at will, whenever they wish to punish you.

    This isn't discipline. It's sadism-sexless, boring, mean-spirited bureaucratic sadism. The school's officials are seeking to hurt the child because they enjoy doing it.

    This Stalinism of the inadequate isn't a fluke. Across the country, time and again, little boys (always boys) are suspended for pointing chicken fingers and saying "bang," for drawing soldiers or the Trade Centers in flames. The schools are in the hands of sodden prisses, intellectual offal, who don't like male children. Mediocrity loves revenge, revenge on others for one's own mediocrity.

    "Passive aggression," if memory serves, means an attempt to hurt others while pretending that one's aim is pious. Passive aggression, and its cousin misdirected aggression, dominate American culture. Again and again, bullying is packaged as high principle.

    Consider the persecution of smokers-which is what it is. Yes, reasonable restrictions on smoking are, well, reasonable. To have a smoking section in a restaurant is an exercise in consideration, given that having a stream of smoke in one's eyes is unpleasant.

    By contrast, putting signs in a subway saying that "second-hand smoke" shortens the lives of children, which it doesn't, with a picture of a piteous, helpless, wide-eyed child, is sheer hostility. So are laws banning smoking within fifteen feet of governmental buildings. The intention is not to provide for the common comfort, but to make smokers as miserable as possible.

    The giveaway of a mean-spirited law is that it doesn't do what it pretends to do, yet makes people unhappy. Consider the agitations of the rabble opposed to guns. These vessels of rightness transparently are not concerned to prevent crime with firearms. You hear nothing from them favoring mandatory heavy sentences for using a gun in a crime. Nor do they criticize the drug dealer in the ghetto who kills his enemies. Their efforts are aimed at law-abiding men who own guns.

    It is personal hostility disguised as concern with crime.

    Similar spuriousness underlies the degrading searches at airports. The government's policy isn't rational. If we armed pilots, watched Moslems, and conducted searches, I might believe that security was the motive. But we don't. Taking nail clippers is ridiculous, like suspending a kid for having a laser pointer. The searches seem designed to humiliate. I have been searched by, among others, Israelis and Japanese. Neither had people undressing in public, and neither was staffed by hostile minorities getting even.

    There is in all of this, in so very much of American life today, a vindictive meanness enwrapped in moral pose-in hate-crime laws, in careers deliberately destroyed over imaginary sexual harassment, people destroyed over any trace of racial incorrectness, fathers prevented from seeing their children by vengeful exes and worse courts. Why?

    I'll guess that the cause is a confluence of two social currents. First, the United States is an angry, divided, unhappy country, twisted by unresolved conflicts that it refuses to face. Racial tension is ugly, powerful, and a forbidden topic. Women are grindingly angry at men. Men, angry at the divorce laws, avoid marriage. Universal divorce causes deep strains that we don't talk about. Children raised as half-abandoned mall rats turn into angry young adults.

    The recently acquired American habit of distributing emoluments by race and sex rather than merit rubs people raw. The decay of the schools into centers of indoctrination angers many. The inability to escape the filth that flows from Hollyork grates. Perhaps more so does the inability in a mass, centrally run, not particularly free society to influence one's surroundings, raise one's children in one's values, or escape ever-deepening regulation.

    Repressed anger seeks outlets.

    The United States is further, I think, a frightened country, or at least an insecure one. People are afraid of terrorists and crime but more importantly vaguely afraid of a life that isn't satisfactory, yet seems uncontrollable by them. There is a widespread sense that the country is sliding fast toward something undesirable yet hidden in the murk Insecurity breeds both meanness and a desire for control.

    The feminization of society plays its part. On average, men prefer freedom to security; women, security to freedom. Women, having climbed into a male world in which they don't seem comfortable, seek laws, laws, laws to control every cause of angst. Men, hemmed in, feel trapped. Much of the tightening control seeks security-helmet laws for kids on bicycles, fear of smoke, seat-belt laws, ever-falling definitions of drunk driving, warning labels stating the universally known, the neurotic fear of laser pointers, the hostility of a female-run school system to competition and rough games beloved of boys.

    The astonishing thing in the latter is that women, thought to be nurturing of children, will destroy, will permit the destruction, of boy children by an angry sisterhood in the schools. The instinct of motherhood is perhaps overstated.

    The answer? I suggest Cebu, Mexico, or Thailand.

    *Greeley Tribune, Jan 8

    ©Fred Reed 2002
    --------------------------------------


    Lately, I wonder if it's at all fixable. Fred, BTW, HAS moved to Mexico. Sometimes I think I should join him (and I'm only 1/2 kidding! OK, maybe a third.) Or maybe Singapore...? (Forget chewing gum, twoblick, can you own and carry guns there...?)

    Matis
     
  23. dleong

    dleong Member

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    Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe it was William Safire who described Singapore as "Disneyland with the Death Penalty."

    Few people smile in Singapore; there is really not much to be happy about there. If you are a tourist, the government will go out of their way to accommodate you, as they want your dollars. But just spend some time talking with the locals, away from the prying eyes and ears of the government, and you will soon discover that the people there are essentially graceless and soulless automatons who have become that way from decades of being told what they can and cannot do by a paternalistic and dictatorial government.

    DL
     
  24. twoblink

    twoblink Member

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    S'pore runs like a computer simulation; and the people in it have set routines..

    Thailand is growing as an out of US choice; food is great; people friendly; there's Muay thai; and gun ownership (I think)...

    Since the news that I got robbed last night; it served as a great example to my friends in Singapore; regardless; the government can't protect you 24/7; only you can.

    I seem to prefer (if I had to choose) the non-vague laws of Singapore to those of the PRK. You are right; at least I _KNOW_ when I've committed a sin in Singapore; in the PRK; you just don't know...

    Spore people are not happy; they work; work; work; and live in oppression... The toilets are clean; but the people are unhappy.. Clean toilets don't equal happiness...

    They say: the Sigaporeons work for "the 5 C's"
    Cash
    Credit card
    Condo
    Car
    Career

    "Caliber" doesn't seem to be one of the C's.. :D

    As a result; nobody is having kids here; and so the Ministry of Fertility (hehehe I just made that up, but I'm sure it actually exists) is trying to encourage families to have kids..

    And this piece of 2"x2" real estate exists in singapore WHERE??

    I'm going shopping (which is pretty much all there is to do in Spore, aside from eating..) and I'm going to keep looking for a local copy of 1984 and/or BNW.. If I am able to find one (which I doubt, sensorship is a national pasttime here) but if/when I do, I will take a picture of me, holding the book, in front of the Raffles statue.. :p
     
  25. BerettaNut92

    BerettaNut92 Member

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    I second the 'at least the Singaporeans know when they're breaking the law'.

    Twoblink, your penpal is female, right?
     
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