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Improving handgun skills and dry-fire practice

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by allank, Apr 30, 2009.

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  1. allank

    allank Member

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    I want to improve my handgun shooting skills. Partly due to higher ammo prices, partly to reduce my training time by not driving to range multiple times per week, and largely because of the lack of ammo availability I want to start dry-firing practice at home.

    Where should I start? What drill(s) would be effective? Any good websites or books I should be reading?

    Also I've also heard about the Front Sight Defensive Handgun Dry Practice Manual. At $39 it is not too expensive. Would it be worth getting that? Can it be followed without taking the matching Front Sight course?

    Thanks for your comments and suggestions.
     
  2. REAPER4206969

    REAPER4206969 Member

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  3. REAPER4206969

    REAPER4206969 Member

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    Right hand shooter:
    [​IMG]


    Left hand shooter:
    [​IMG]
     
  4. SigSauerIsBetter

    SigSauerIsBetter Member

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    Tracking & Drills

    There are 40+ drills available at http://www.rangelog.com . You can track your progress using the log book and see how you are progressing, good for tracking dry firing (draws, trigger pulls, etc.)
     
  5. WNTFW

    WNTFW Member

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    I did improve my handgun shooting with non firing practice. I did it all through web research.

    This involved dry firing and hand gun manipulation. Safety is an issue so be sure the gun is unloaded and take all precautions.

    Look up "Bump Drill". It is a good drill as you can practice it as dry fire & live fire. Work on establishing your grip, hand and arm position. Work on acquiring sights. Trigger discipline is a good area to work on.

    Establish a plan before going to the range. Make sure you have a goal or even a list of what you are going to do. I found the target carriers swing a lot at indoor ranges. If you can stabilize the targer it will be easier to assess your results.

    I also advocate getting a .22LR pistol - providing you can get ammo for it.
     
  6. allank

    allank Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions and links. Should keep me busy for a while :) Also thanks for confirming that dry fire / practice can help.
     
  7. VegasOPM

    VegasOPM Member

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    I can tell you that the top USPSA and IDPA shooters have done 10's of 1000's of hours of dry fire to get where they are right now. Draw, grip, stance, natural point of aim, index, sight alignment, transitions, movement and trigger control don't need a "bang" at the end. The only thing that live fire adds is verification of the above, recoil control and tracking the sights.
     
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