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In memory of today 1941

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by jeepnik, Dec 7, 2018.

  1. jeepnik

    jeepnik Member

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    I know there are some relatively strict rules on post topics so I will post a photo that will keep this, hopefully, legal.

    12-7-1941 the US suffered it's worst naval attack. It brought us actively into WWII. The photo below is of a lamp my grandfather made out of a shell from the 3" gun that was onboard the USS Vestal. She was tied up alongside the USS Arizona.

    The USS Vestal though struck by two bombs and surviving the massive explosion that destroyed the USS Arizona. The USS Vestal grounded herself and continued to provide anti aircraft fire until the japanese retreated.
    KwC5Uk2.png
     
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  2. <*(((><
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    <*(((>< Luke

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    RIP all those that were lost on this day 1941. That's an awesome momento of the day and a testament to American Grit, even the equipment doesn't give up without a fight!

    The Commander Cassian Young deserves much respect! Saved countless lives with his heroism!
     
  3. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    Cool lamp. My father was a high school senior on this day in 1941. When he heard the news he knew where he was headed after graduation.
     
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  4. ontarget

    ontarget Member

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    God Bless America.
     
  5. Shae1324

    Shae1324 Member

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    Ooooh Rah! Thank you for your family's service.
     
  6. NIGHTLORD40K

    NIGHTLORD40K Member

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    My great uncle was lost aboard the battleship Oklahoma during the attack on Pearl Harbor, and both grandfathers served in the Pacific- truly the greatest generation.

    Grandpa Ray died before I was born, though I do have a few pictures, letters, and souvenirs he brought back. He spent most of his time as a supply officer well behind the front, much off it in the Philippines after they were liberated.

    Grandpa Mario wouldn't talk about his service much, but we know he fought on Leyte and Okinawa, and certainly suffered from PTSD when he got home. Grandma found him sleeping beneath the bed for months afterwards, and he would have night terrors as if grappling with an unseen enemy.

    He was a gifted artist and I have many sketches he made over there, and some paintings he made from the sketch book after the war, along with his medals and a stack of Army of Occupation "funny money".

    When I asked him about the weapons he used in the war, his only answer was, "I don't remember."

    It was only just recently that we found a photo of him in Basic with a Garand, though he was Corps of Engineers, so I suspect he probably carried a Carbine and/or Grease Gun once over there. A fine, kind, man- I miss him a lot.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2018
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  7. Mauser lover

    Mauser lover Member

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    My Great-grandpa was an old man when it started. He was 36 when Pearl was bombed. I believe he was in the army already, but he ended up training gunners on this thing...

    https://www.full30.com/video/fcd5165fd0f21f2cb76a9fff7c7c1603

    I was very happy when I saw that Ian found one and covered it! I have his training manual, somewhere...

    We asked him once, when I was very young, what the ear protection was for the soldiers being trained on it. He lifted his left hand and covered his left ear. Which probably explains why we always had to basically shout for him to hear us.

    He was also on Okinawa shortly after the fighting for that island to load/unload shipping. He was in charge of a unit of stevedores. As far as I could tell/remember, the only weapon they ever issued him was a knife. Which, again... is around here somewhere. Apparently nobody expected the crews unloading shipping to need a real weapon, and as far as I was ever told... they were right!

    He did his own funeral too! He had someone film him delivering a sermon (tough to call it anything but that) that he wanted played at his funeral. Not too many folks get to say that they preached at their own funerals!
     
  8. Carl N. Brown

    Carl N. Brown Member

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    jmr40 Post #3 "My father was a high school senior on this day in 1941. When he heard the news he knew where he was headed after graduation."
    The Japanese war party headed by Tojo believed that a stunning blow like the Raid on Pearl Harbor would have America on its knees suing for peace on Japanese terms.
    "Remember Pearl Harbor" became a rallying cry with the same effect as "Remember the Alamo", "Remember Fort Sumter", "Remember the Maine", and "Remember the Lusitania".

    Japanese Admiral Yamamoto in early 1942 after leading what turned out to be remembered as the Pearl Harbor Sneak Attack wrote a friend: "A military man can scarcely pride himself on having 'smitten a sleeping enemy'; it is more a matter of shame, simply, for the one smitten. I would rather you made your appraisal after seeing what the enemy does, since it is certain that, angered and outraged, he will soon launch a determined counterattack."

    My dad served in the 6th Inf Div in the Pacific, Battle of Lone Tree Hill in New Guinea, Landing at Lingayen Gulf and Luzon Campaign in the Philipines. In the 1950s me and brother Jeff dragged out of him the stories behind his Bronze Star and Purple Heart. In private talks he respected the Japanese soldier but hated the war leaders. During the fifties and later he was part of the Military Order of the Cooties dedicated to visting and entertaining veterans in VA hospitals.

    To make it gun related: he carried a BAR and according to the telegram Granma received over his Bronze Star he used it to great effect. He would use an M1 Garand if a BAR was not available, but had no use for the 1928A1 Thompson, M1 Carbine, or .45 Colt 1911A1. He did use grenades for fishing and shot wild boar with his BAR and traded the meat to natives of New Guinea for intelligence about the Japanese.

    ADDED: Years ago I found a family photo of Dad, home on leave, in uniform, on the family farm, with the same Brown family farm .22 rifle I believe he used to teach me shooting when I was six. Marlin bolt action tube magazine. I think my cousins have that rifle now. I would always seek it out when we visited my uncle.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2018
  9. Iroquois

    Iroquois Member

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    I believe I heard today that this was the first year that no WWII vets were able to attend the Pear Harbor Ceremony. I came in on the tail end of the discussion on the radio, so please correct me if I’m wrong. If so, a very sad day for those brave men.

    Thank you to all that have served.
     
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    <*(((>< Luke

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    I believe no veterans that survived the USS Arizona were there for the first time.
     
  11. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    ^ I heard that myself. I think there are only 5 left and none made it this year.

    Edit: these are the only living Arizona survivors, Lou Conter, Don Stratton, Ken Potts, Lonnie Cook and Lauren Bruner
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2018
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  12. Shanghai McCoy

    Shanghai McCoy Member

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    There are not too many WW2 vets still around these day.
    My dad joined the Navy right after Pearl Harbor. He was 44 years old at the time and our family legend had him as, probably,the youngest seaman recruit at the time. He was a MM-1 and served in the Pacific on LST's and LSD's. He passed away when he was 74 but was active in the American Legion and VFW after the war.
     
  13. If1HitU

    If1HitU Member

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    R.I.P.Soldiers, Sailors, Airman's & Marines at Peral Habor!
     
  14. WiTom

    WiTom Member

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    My father lives with us, and still blesses us with a story that we haven't heard every now and then, but at 95, the old age is taking it's toll. My dad remembers that day, and knew his future. He was Airborne. Thank you all, past and present, who served our country.
     
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  15. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    I have strong family ties to WWII. Both my grandfatheres served. As did most of my unclers, and several of my Aunts.

    Was poignantly reminded of much of that while watching the various ceremonies at my alma mater as George H.W. Bush was laid to rest there on Thursday.

    I for one, give thanks for my nation, and am humbled by the sacrifices made that I can enjoy my liberty.

    So count me proud to carry on the tradition of "...[A] rifle behind every blade of grass..."
     
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  16. redneck2

    redneck2 Member

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    I had an mint 1911 that my neighbor carried as a fighter/bomber pilot in the Pacific. I’m old enough that I’m getting rid of my guns. Gave it to my best friend’s son that’s a hard core shooter.

    Had a friend that drove a landing craft on D-day. Made five trips. He had been on a ship, got transferred and three days later his first ship hit a mine. Killed everyone on board.

    Some of the absolutely bravest had to be the first guys that did bombing runs over Germany. You had a 100% chance of being either killed or captured. They still line up to volunteer anyway. Probably 1/2 the guys that fought in Europe or the pacific deserved medals.
     
  17. Officers'Wife

    Officers'Wife Member

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    I had the honor and privilege to help care for a man that was assigned to the Arizona. Even though when he was alive he gave five different stories of where he was during the attack at his funeral the Chaplin read his commendation received that day. Even though his "position" was "made aware" to the enemy he continued to fire a heavy machine at the bomber and fighters even though he received two wounds.
     
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  18. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    To our greatest generation, and the global defeat and total and unconditional surrender of axis powers in less than 4 years.
    1941.jpg
     
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  19. Striker

    Striker Member

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    To absent companions.....
     
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  20. Texas10mm

    Texas10mm Member

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    My mother's oldest brother landed on White beach Leyte. Fought all the way through the battle. He never talked about it.
     
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  21. cheygriz

    cheygriz member

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    Lest we forget!

    20140520_wp_luxemborg_ABMC_0057.jpg
     
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  22. GEM

    GEM Moderator Staff Member

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    Actually the surrender of Japan was not unconditional. They were allowed to keep the Emperor as a figure head when many of the allies wanted him tried as a war criminal. The US strategists were convinced if they did not allow his continued existence, the war might have continued or we would have seen continued resistance even after a 'surrender'. The rest of Japanese royalty were made not royal, if that makes sense. No dukes, etc. Being a prince or princess was very limited in the line of succession.

    My uncle was a pilot and was there at one of the air field and told me about the attack and his comrades being shot down as they ran for their planes.. He was given a cosmoline covered Springfield and a bandolier of ammo as they were expecting to go into the hills for the invasion.

    This thread, while certainly worthwhile, is a touch off topic, so let it go - hate to close it. Most things have been said.
     
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  23. P5 Guy

    P5 Guy Member

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    My Dad quit high school at the semester's end in 1941 and went to enlist with a note from his father because he was 16. Recruiter sent him telling him wait to be drafted. So Dad went to the Philadelphia Ship yard and went to work. A couple years later the draft notice came and Dad went to Africa.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2018
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  24. Officers'Wife

    Officers'Wife Member

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    My Grandfather was in the mountains of Leyte when the Americans landed. His people broke into small teams and hit the Japanese rear areas. I guess it was "hit & run" harassment meant to entice troops away from the main fighting. Or as Dad would put it - "raise <expletive deleted> and cause accidents." The only thing he told me about the entire occupation was it was the only time the Christians and the Moros hated someone more than each other.

    I wish I could have gotten to know him better.
     
  25. JWF III

    JWF III Member

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    My great uncle was in the Army on the infamous day. He was stationed on the mountain overlooking the harbor. I never heard him speak of it, but he passed when I was 10. The only thing he ever told my dad of it was that the Japanese flew right over their station on the way in. But with it being Sunday, the armory was locked up. And the only thing that they could do was watch it as it happened.

    I would give anything for the chance to sit down and talk with him, and 2 other great uncles that served. Each of them flew in bombers. 1 a waist gunner in a B25, the other we’re guessing a tail gunner in a 17. The later was shot down over Cologne, Germany. He was the only 1 of the crew that didn’t make it out. That’s why we were guessing a tail gunner. Grandad also served, officer in Europe, another I’d like to talk to. I’m not sure he saw any combat. But he was stationed, in Frankfurt iirc, from 45 to 48 for the reconstruction.

    That entire generation of men, and women, was amazing. “Great” just doesn’t quite say enough of what they did, and endured.

    Wyman
     
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