Intregal Revolver Locks

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Catpop, Jan 19, 2019.

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  1. zaitcev

    zaitcev Member

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    I have a Taurus that came with a lock from the factory. Unlike the S&W, the entirety of the mechanism of the lock was contained inside the hammer. I removed the lock and filled the void with molten lead. I think it helped with light strikes.

    taurus.jpg
     
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  2. 6.8KT

    6.8KT member

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    I remember reading something about it several years ago, and since my 442 has the lock, I 'googled' and found out that it does happen more than I'm comfortable with; and that also the lock could be deleted. So I watched a video or three about how to delete it.

    But I never actually got to the point of deleting it. (I'm kinda lazy). Also, I don't really shoot it much to check for function, but thus far it's been flawless. I just gamble that it won't fail when I do carry it and in the event I actually need it.

    I might delete it someday. Or just sell it. I don't know.
     
  3. dickydalton

    dickydalton Member

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    I have a Davidson's New vaquero 45 Colt that has a lock in the grip.
     
  4. Catpop

    Catpop Member

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    dickydalton
    Can you post a pic of under grip RUGER lock so we can ogle it? Thanks
     
  5. DPris

    DPris Member Emeritus

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    For a while, Ruger used an in-line key lock under the grips on certain single-actions.
    Those are long gone.
    Denis
     
  6. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    The Centennial J frames are all available with or without the ILS. That of course includes your M442. I bought one the first week they were available.
     
  7. 6.8KT

    6.8KT member

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    I bought mine circa 2009, on an impulse, and wasn't aware of the lock at the time.
    Normally I research anything I buy, but not that time.
     
  8. Styx

    Styx Member

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    It's also going to tick (to put it nicely), a lot of people off who spent $700-$1000+ on a current model revolver with a lock if S&W removes the lock in the future. Their firearms will lose hundreds in value overnight...

    The only S&W revolver I own is a 640 pro which does not have a lock. I want to pick up 627 pc snub, but the lock is one of the main reasons keeping me from doing so....
     
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  9. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    Massad Ayoob also has a first hand account of a failure that rendered the gun inoperable.
     
  10. SteadyD

    SteadyD Member

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    If you can find one, they did make that model prior to the lock, but it’s crazy expensive for the pre-lock model. Between $2000 and $3000 last I looked!
     
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  11. Waveski

    Waveski Member

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    A plugged hole is still a hole. Sell it.
     
  12. George P

    George P member

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    No locks are available on many models to us "regular civilians"; I own a 642 like that
    Worse come to worse, simply remove the lock and get the plug for the Hillary Hole
    Folks making WAY too much about this
     
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  13. alfsauve

    alfsauve Member

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    I'm with Drail. The S&W lock is so flimsy, even Rube Goldberg would shake his head.

    I've removed it from my main 686 competition gun.
     
  14. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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    Looking at the mechanism, I understand how recoil torque could flip the lock plate on.

    My 642 has a lock, and it took about 10 minutes to grind the lock nub off and polish it smooth. Now I don't have to wonder.
     
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  15. chicharrones

    chicharrones needs more ammo

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  16. milemaker13

    milemaker13 Member

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    I have a T85 with the hammer blocking screw built it. As has been stated it wont move unless i use the little 'wrench'.
    Is the S&W revolver lock different in that a spring can unintentionally snap it into 'locked 'position?

    If so... that sucks.
     
  17. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    But there is no tiny spring to break or dislodge where the lock can set itself. That lock has to be manually set with the key. Again, the S&W lock is always set and has to be turned off with a key and relies on a tiny spring to keep it that way.
     
  18. BSA1

    BSA1 member

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    I have a Taurus M941 with the internal lock in the hammer. I have not had any problems with light primer strikes and, as far as internal locks go, the best design.

    I am considering getting a S&W Model 69. I have no idea why I want a gun that serves absolutely no useful purpose for me so maybe that is why I want it. If I do get one I will replace the internal lock with "The Plug". As commented I consider the internal lock something waiting to fail just when you need your gun to work the most.
     
  19. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    ^^^This is where I am at. Since S&W started to put locks on their revolvers, I have heard tens of thousands of re[ports of them failing. When it come down to proof, it's always "well, it was a friend of a friend.....but my friends saw it happen!". With no follow up proof showing it was lock failure....or the reply is vague and incomplete. Can they fail? Sure. Do they fail? Probably. Again, they are another part. In reality, the rate of failure must be pretty low, and lower than other issues. Have yet to ever personally read or hear of an actual incident where the lock failed when the gun was needed....i.e., SD or hunting. Most folks know that S&W's lock is easily removed if not wanted, and thus, any amount of risk of failure is now gone. I have 5 S&W revolvers with locks on them. Probably have 20,000 rounds thru them. This include dedicated hunting revolvers shooting heavy recoiling hunting loads. While the extractor rods have loosened up after a long period of range use and locked up the guns, I have yet to ever have a IL lock 'em up. Maybe we need to eliminate extractor rods on S&Ws............

    As for the Bane and Ayoob references......from the "Lucky Gunner" lounge,

     
  20. dickydalton

    dickydalton Member

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    How many people have failure to feed on their autos? Jammed up, stovepiped or magazine fell out? Did you trash your auto? Or do you hope it never happens again?
     
  21. Styx

    Styx Member

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    They most certainly wouldn't carry that gun until the problem was fixed. If it was an inherent problem with the design (like it might be with the S&W lock), they most likely would trash that particular make/model or stopped carrying that brand all together... Plus, are you really comparing a malfunction that can be cleared relatively quickly during a self defense allocation or during competition to a malfunction that'll render the entire firearm inoperable?
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2019
  22. 18DAI

    18DAI Member

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    Check out the Kuhnhausen S&W Revolvers 5th edition for an honest opinion of the state of current production s&w revolver. ;)

    The fanboys of the wind up guns are aghast at what he has to say. :)
     
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  23. Styx

    Styx Member

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    Care to elaborate?
     
  24. DPris

    DPris Member Emeritus

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    These locks are a controversial issue & tend to get quite emotional in threads about 'em.

    Many specious arguments are raised as to why they're no big deal, and truly they MAY not be a big deal for recreational shooters where a gun that locks itself up at the range is merely a nuisance.

    There are, however, some facts to be considered.
    One is that they undeniably add complexity to a very good design that is NOT improved in the slightest by their inclusion.

    Another is that they DO fail.
    While most individual users don't call the S&W Lock Failure Hotline, or their local TV news department, to report lock failures to be included in the national lock failure database; totally dismissing any account of a failure that you did not personally witness yourself is fatuous.

    Another is that the percentages, as I noted earlier, ARE LOW, but THEY DO HAPPEN.
    The odds are in your favor that your lock-equipped Smith revolver will never lock up on you.
    But- there's always that small percentage that offsets those odds, and how can you guarantee you won't land among that group that falls on the wrong side of the odds?
    With a lock, you're vulnerable to the laws of chance.
    Without a lock, that particular vulnerability does not exist.

    Another is the inference that these locks only seem to fail at the range, and never when actually needed, as when hunting or for self defense.
    Consider, again, the percentages- a typical range session may involve anywhere from 50 to 200 rounds fired, whereas a hunt or defensive encounter may only involve one or two.
    Where, again, do the odds of lock failure point you?
    The range may be where the odds are greatest of a lock failure, due to sheer volume, but that in no way suggests that a failure won't happen after you've fired your first shot at a deer or attacker.
    Also realize that most of these locked Smiths are not used for hunting, which further diminishes the possibility of a failure in the field.
    And that in both of the cases we've been discussing, Bane's & Ayoob's, those happened to new guns.
    As in the possibility of a first-occasion failure does exist, which is directly applicable to a buyer obtaining one for home defense & not shooting it much before it might be needed.

    Arguments for & against a lock that nobody asked for & nobody needs, and which IS a bad design and which IS known to periodically fail, will continue as long as S&W continues to insist on using them.
    The odds are in your favor, but if the lock's there, so does undeniably exist at least the possibility of failure, if not the probability.

    We can bicker back & forth all day long, and there will be no consensus.
    It boils down to this:

    S&W took an unwanted position with these locks.
    They are maintaining (for the most part) that position, in the face of strong customer dislike.
    They are not admitting any fault with that lock.
    They show no signs of backing down.

    Many buyers today suffer from DK-DC Syndrome (Don't Know-Don't Care), until or unless they encounter a failure themselves.

    Since the only new Smith revolvers offered (excepting a handful of Js) WILL have that lock, if you want new & it's gotta be a Smith then you have no choice, you're stuck with the lock.
    You buy the horse, you also buy the horse manure that comes with it, and you deal with the downside.

    We all have to make a choice- we play the odds & buy a new Smith with lock, or we don't.
    Chances are we'll be fine if we do.
    Understanding that somewhere, sometime, somehow, somebody WON'T be fine, and a failure WILL occur.
    Whether that somebody is you, and whether it'll be at the range playing or in your hand fighting for your life, nobody can predict.

    Once again, all of this has been an extended answer to the original poster's question.
    Yes- the locks do fail.
    Not often, but yes, they do.
    Denis
     
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  25. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    I wonder what the mean time between failures of the S&W lock compare with the mean time between failures of other components in the firing control system in the revolver.
     
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