Is a thumbhole or finger hole in the blade a good design for a food prep knife?

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by C0untZer0, Nov 14, 2021.

  1. C0untZer0

    C0untZer0 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    Messages:
    5,199
    Location:
    Illinois
    I have to think it is not a good design or professional chefs would use knives that had a finger hole in them right?

    I'm not necessarily talking about this particular knife which looks gimmicky to me, I'm just using the picture to illustrate my question. The ad says the knife "features a precision index finger hole for superior control."

    I'm just wondering if anyone has ever used a design like this...

    hole in blade.jpg

    I have Wüsthof knives that I've used for decades, but lately I actually prefer using a set of vintage Old Hickory knives that were given to me. The Old Hickory knives don't have a bolster like the Wüsthof and it is easier for me to do dicing pinching the blade, rather than holding the knife by the handle behind the bolster. Getting out in front of the bolster of the Wüsthof is also kind of awkward so I've been using the old Old Hickory knives for cutting vegetables.
     
  2. danez71

    danez71 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    Messages:
    5,599
    Location:
    CA,AZ,CA,TX
    No, I've never used a food prep knife with a hole like that nor would buy one. I could see how/why but those are so limited imo and it can't be comfortable on you finger for long.

    I rarely choke up on the knife past the bolster. For me, I just don't think it's needed and if it is, better to use a more fitting knife for the job.

    I generally prefer to use handle for what it's intended for.


    Side note, long pinky nail in knife ad?
     
    Boattale likes this.
  3. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    61,260
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    Avoid this new gimmick. Social media and Internet marketing has been heavy. Ignore it.
     
    JShirley and Boattale like this.
  4. Boattale

    Boattale Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,136
    Location:
    SWMO
    I have not. It looks awkward as all get out to me.
     
    danez71 likes this.
  5. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    61,260
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    Asia/Pakistan
     
    danez71 likes this.
  6. C0untZer0

    C0untZer0 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    Messages:
    5,199
    Location:
    Illinois
    Oh wow I didn't notice that. Kinda creepy...
     
  7. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    30,854
    Location:
    Florence, Alabama
    I don't understand the fashion of leaving whack marks on the blade.
    Just makes it harder to clean. Old Hickory and real custom alike.
     
  8. Atavar

    Atavar Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2021
    Messages:
    397
    Location:
    Bemidji, Mn
    The “theory” on the whack marks or other texture on the blade is less contact hence less friction or binding. Like the holes in a cheese knife.
    Personally I think it’s just marketing hype.
     
  9. Shanghai McCoy

    Shanghai McCoy Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Messages:
    5,040
    Location:
    The,sort of, Free state
    The Jeff Spivey Sabertooth belt knife has a finger hole but it is in a more practical location on the knife.
     
  10. goon

    goon Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2003
    Messages:
    7,264
    I have a Victorinox Forester with a hole for opening in the main blade. I’ve used it traveling as a steak / paring knife a few times because it’s sharp and it was there - but the hole grabs food and is harder to clean. I wouldn’t buy a purpose-made kitchen knife with an extra hole.
     
    C0untZer0 likes this.
  11. rust collector
    • Contributing Member

    rust collector Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Messages:
    3,798
    Location:
    Pierre, SD USA
    The "whack marks" in the illustration were stamped in the blade to give it a hand forged look. The Granton edge, made to reduce adhesion to sliced food, is a series of eliptical grind marks evenly spaced behind the edge. The finger hole is a mindless marketing feature that threatens to create hot spots if used and adds challenges to keeping the blade sanitary.

    If you have seen the knives used to break down tuna and other fish to produce those impressive steaks and other cuts, you will laugh at the clumsy knife-like object in the photo. ;)
     
    theotherwaldo and C0untZer0 like this.
  12. C0untZer0

    C0untZer0 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    Messages:
    5,199
    Location:
    Illinois



    These guys use a 6" Victorinox semi-stiff boning knife with rosewood handle.

    Victorinox 5_6606_15__s1.jpg

    I know the example I used is a gimmick knife. I was wondering about the design aspect of having a hole in the blade for "superior control."
     
  13. rust collector
    • Contributing Member

    rust collector Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Messages:
    3,798
    Location:
    Pierre, SD USA
    As you figured, marketing BS. Here's a glimpse of the knives used to carve tuna for sashimi. Cutting starts about 6 minutes in.
     
  14. C0untZer0

    C0untZer0 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    Messages:
    5,199
    Location:
    Illinois
    There are a bunch of different whale flensing instruments, but the "Blubber Knife" seems similar to what those chefs were using to carve the tuna:

    Flensing_blubber_Knife.jpg

    The "Tuna Cutting Show" is a popular attraction, this video has pretty decent subtitles:

     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2021
    rust collector likes this.
  15. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2008
    Messages:
    8,564
    Location:
    Flatlandistan
    Who knew it took 4-5 guys to process one fish?

    Talk about labor intensive. lol

    No holes in my kitchen knives, please.
     
  16. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2011
    Messages:
    12,848
    Yeah I noticed the coke nail right away too LOL!

    In answer to the question, it always seems if a knife that large needs a hole in it so you can choke up on the blade, you are using a blade bigger than you need. IMO a well designed knife keeps your hand close to the blade but protected. Pick the correct size for use, and have a variety. When you consider how inexpensive a well made knife is, and how long it will last if cared for, they are too cheap not to have many to choose from.

    I only welcome finger holes and finger choils on small knives that the designer was trying to keep under a certain length, but also create a little more room for your hand to occupy. Compactness sometimes drives the need for these types of modifications. A large chef's or butcher's knife? No thanks. Pick the right knife.
     
    danez71 likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice