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Is There a Reason Primer Boxes Have Gotten so Big?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by barnbwt, Mar 4, 2013.

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  1. Fire_Moose

    Fire_Moose Member

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    Haha me too.

    Sent from my CZ85 Combat
     
  2. Drail

    Drail Member

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    I don't have a link but i remember back in the 90s when Federal redesigned their packaging. Supposedly in some tests they set off an entire pallet of primers (in the old small packaging) and people who lived miles away were calling 911 asking what the hell just blew up. I don't have any problem with their bulky packaging if it makes primers safer to ship. Deal with it. These things are very dangerous in large quantities and Federal primers ARE very sensitive. With things the way they are now I am amazed that you can load them onto a truck and ship them cross country. I used to drive fuel tankers and you couldn't pay me enough to drive a truck full of primers. No way.
     
  3. Fire_Moose

    Fire_Moose Member

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    I know there are limits to how much powder can go on one truck. I'd assume there is a similar limit for primers.

    Sent from my CZ85 Combat
     
  4. fguffey

    fguffey Member

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    R. Lee, in his book on modern reloading claimed Federal primers were more powerful, he spent a lot if time pointing out the perils of of getting them close to gather, then? When giving credits he claimed he did not test Federal primers, he said he did not test Federal primers because they did not donate primers to be tested. So, it could be said Federal, in an effort to give R. Lee something to complain about they started selling their primers in large primer trays to make it difficult to transfer primers from the large tray to the Lee automatic hand hand primer.

    My favorite primer is the ‘more powerful’ primer, I use a lot of Federal primers, moving primers from the large tray to a flip tray to any hand primer has never been a problem for me.

    F. Guffey
     
  5. Nalgi

    Nalgi Member

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    DUH!

    its because us Baby Boomers cant work with the little ones anymore
     
  6. Queen_of_Thunder

    Queen_of_Thunder member

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    What! Now I'm heaing this. Many people reccomended that I use Federal primers only and now I hear this. What gives?
     
  7. Triumph

    Triumph Member

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    Federal Primers

    Interesting!

    I purchased some Federal & CCI primers the other day & was wondering about the packaging. Ordered a bunch of CCI off Cabelas last night. Only have a few hundred Federal. I'll be sure not to look at the Federals wrong:eek:

    I was reading LEE's book last night and he is very anti primer tube (for any primers) & Federal primers for Lee primer system.

    I have a Dillon 550B on the way & now have a very healthy fear of a kaboom in the primer tube (have now seen 3 other threads on it). I know it's very rare but don't want to be the guy!!

    Guess I'll use save the Federal primers for my single stage & use the CCI in the Dillon primer tubes.
     
  8. Lj1941

    Lj1941 Member

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    Safety-Greater space between individual primers:)
     
  9. Trent

    Trent Resident Wiseguy

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    Has a Dillon primer tube ever gone off? With 6 spots of separation from the priming surface, from the tube, I'd think it'd be very difficult to get a Dillon tube to go during the reloading operation.
     
  10. fguffey

    fguffey Member

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    Today, 11:32 AM #32
    Triumph
    Member


    Join Date: October 19, 2010
    Location: Houston, TX
    Posts: 213 Federal Primers

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Interesting!

    I purchased some Federal & CCI primers the other day & was wondering about the packaging. Ordered a bunch of CCI off Cabelas last night. Only have a few hundred Federal. I'll be sure not to look at the Federals wrong

    I was reading LEE's book last night and he is very anti primer tube (for any primers) & Federal primers for Lee primer system.

    I have a Dillon 550B on the way & now have a very healthy fear of a kaboom in the primer tube (have now seen 3 other threads on it). I know it's very rare but don't want to be the guy!!

    Guess I'll use save the Federal primers for my single stage & use the CCI in the Dillon primer tubes.



    “I was reading LEE's book last night and he is very anti primer tube (for any primers) & Federal primers for Lee primer system”

    Trumphy, as a suggestion, keep reading, there is a gap between “anti primer tube (for any primers) & Federal primers for Lee primer system”, he gives thanks to all those companies that donated to his cause, he claims he did not test Federal primers because Federal did not donate primers to be tested. I am not saying R. Lee was not happy with Federal, I am not saying they did not respect him in his effort and as a results he did not respect Federal in his book, I am not saying he covered himself by making the claim “I did not test Federal primers”. I did not purchase Lee’s book on modern reloading, it was given to me, the person that gave it to me called a few days after giving me the book with a question. I ask him why he did not read the book before giving it to me. Seems there was something he wanted to know but had no interest in reading /researching so he gave me the book knowing I would.

    “I have a Dillon 550B on the way & now have a very healthy fear of a kaboom in the primer tube (have now seen 3 other threads on it). I know it's very rare but don't want to be the guy!!”

    FEAR/RESPECT: The thread from CALGUN.COM was spread throughout the reloading forums, there is a chance there was one instance repeated three different ways. Again, I would not grab for a tube of primers for any reason, as I said before it is not easy to do but when things go really wrong it is better to make that sound than do the wrong thing. Dillon is a manufacturer, they also do testing, Dillon can not set primers off with a discharge of electricity, they can fold loaded primer tubes in the center to crush primers. When folded the primers are crushed/pushed out from the center, if the primers can not exit fast enough the tube splits. It is not easy to crush a short tube, leverage is gained when the tube is supported on the ends. Again, If I should for some reason drop a tube of primers I will try and make that sound, that sound is made when someone is presented with a crises and does not react, they just make that sound. If they act they could kill themselves or others when an animal runs out in front of them and the worst choice is made as in swerving.

    Every winter, drivers are doing good, like “look at me”, “I can really drive good on ice”, then? The first reaction is ‘go for the brakes’, and it is all over, slowly. The best training is practice and knowing when to make that sound.

    F. Guffey
     
  11. Trent

    Trent Resident Wiseguy

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    Thanks fguffey, I did some digging between that post and now, and did find a LOT of blow up Dillon presses.

    Kind of backs up the "wear safety glasses" thing...
     
  12. Hondo 60
    • Contributing Member

    Hondo 60 Member

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    For 99% of us this doesn't need to be mentioned.

    BUT

    Don't forget, priming compound is a mechanical mixture of lead styphnate, antimony sulfide, barium nitrate, and other chemicals.

    DO NOT USE THE PRIMER TRAYS FOR CONSUMABLES. (like ice cubes) :uhoh:
     
  13. plodder

    plodder Member

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    Wow, I have been blissfully cranking out the rounds on my 650XL and blowing up the primers in the feed tube has not been at the top of my concerns. Now when I get back at it tonight or over the weekend I will be paranoid. Maybe a good thing??:eek:
     
  14. Triumph

    Triumph Member

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    That cracked me up. Thanks for the laugh today.
     
  15. SSN Vet

    SSN Vet Member

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    inflation :)

    gotta make 'em feel like they got something extra (air) if you're gonna jack the price
     
  16. BruceB

    BruceB Member

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    Re: Dillon primer tube

    Many years ago, gun-writer Ed Matunas did a "live-fire test" on the Dillon primer shield.

    He set up one of the Dillon steel shields at a safe distance with a full 100-primer tube inside it. A .223 bullet through the tube produced "an impressive fireball"....and that was all.

    A photo of the tube after the test showed distortion around the bullet hole, but that was the extent of the damage....the tube was otherwise intact.

    I would purely HATE to have my face near that explosion, but personal damage would mostly amount to a ringing in the ears. That column of primers is a VERY GOOD reason to always wear good safety glasses when handloading, though.
     
  17. GaryL

    GaryL Member

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    Well, if you don't mind a little educatin'....

    I do automation stuff, including camera inspection systems. I have done many applications ranging from microchips to car doors and candy, with inspection rates up to 1000 parts per minute. A smaller tray would be easier to inspect with automated equipment than a large one. You would get more resolution (pixels) per primer, not to mention the possibility of maybe a lower priced camera for the same capability. The lighting would also be slightly less challenging, as its usually easier to provide consistent illumination in a smaller area for a smaller inspection surface at a lower cost.
     
  18. Ike Arumba

    Ike Arumba Member

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    I accept the above-cited reasons for the larger Federal packages. Nevertheless, this reminds me of something that happened many years ago, when I worked for Hewlett-Packard. Management told us with great enthusiasm about how astute marketing had driven the new redesign of inkjet cartridge boxes. The old boxes had been small and rectangular, making efficient use of materials. The new design was much bigger, with the ends slanted 45 degrees to form a trapezoid when viewed from the top. It was much more wasteful of materials and shelf space. But, they so proudly noted, there was consumer resistance to paying such a high price for such a small box, whereas the bigger box made it look like one got more for the money. The diagonal ends also supposedly made the box look more visible on the shelf from more angles.

    That was when I realized that the HP culture was on its way downhill. Prior to that, the joke had been that if HP had sold sushi, it would be labeled "cold, dead fish".
     
  19. BBQJOE

    BBQJOE Member

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    Oh holy hell.
    Please forgive me. :banghead:

    I hate typing words and thoughts that may have been said or thought before, anywhere.
     
  20. GaryL

    GaryL Member

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    Tiny ice cubes for putting bad primers on ice. :neener:
     
  21. suzukisam

    suzukisam Member

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    I live a few miles from the lake city munitions plant. and every so often just to remind their employees of the dangers they work around, they take a brick of BMG primers and set another brick (can't remember the distance) a little ways away and detonate the first brick, and the second brick goes up shortly after..
     
  22. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    When I first started reloading in 1963 there weren't many options for primers, and you bought anything you could find. All this complaining about packaging size doesn't make any sense to me at all. Everyone should just be happy that components are available and stop worrying about the minutia.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred

    Whew! I feel better now..............
     
  23. rodregier

    rodregier Member

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    I'm happy. Preventing transport "incidents" helps ensure primers can still be shipped by common carriers. The alternative is very ugly to contemplate. Imagine what primers would cost if the transport vehicles were build like EOD transport trucks?
     
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