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Is this going to be a good load? (45 acp)

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by mr_dove, Dec 27, 2007.

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  1. mr_dove

    mr_dove Member

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    I recently switched from a 1911 to an H&K for my concealed carry. I only shot lead with the 1911 and I had a "recipe" that I liked alot. Now, HK's can't shoot lead so I had to buy some copper bullets (230gr) and now I'm on the lookout for a new formula.

    I use titegroup powder and the web site says 4.0 to 4.8 grains for the 230gr bullet.

    I figured I'd start on the low end (4.0gr) but I'm interested in hearing other's opinions.
     
  2. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    That's fine to start, but I believe you will find it needs a bit more to function well. I personally don't like Titegroup for plated bullets, and especially not for lead, actually, and would recommend AA #2, AA #5, W-231, WST, WSF, N310, N320, or Competition, but Titegroup will work fine.
     
  3. buenhec

    buenhec Member

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    Why cant you use lead in an HK?
     
  4. Kimber1911_06238

    Kimber1911_06238 Member

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    hk's and glocks have polyagonal rifling. not supposed to use lead bullets in them.

    my favorite light .45acp load is a 185 grain berry's plated flat point over 4.6 grains of bullseye. light and cheap
     
  5. shadeecat

    shadeecat Member

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    smooth, accurate .45acp loads

    1/1/08--Tuesday

    These function well out to 20 yds. in 1911 A1s with 5" bl.
    But you would have to check them out to see how they work in your particular handgun. Different guns and shooters have their favorite/preferred loads.
    ..................
    200 gr. Rainier P RN bullets and 4.0 gr. of Titegroup (light recoil & accurate). Factory 16 lb. recoil spring. A stouter load is with the same bullet and 4.7 gr. of Titegroup. Both using a COL of 1.250 inches. And a very light taper crimp of 1/32 inch.

    Also, the Speer#4478 Gold Dot, 200 gr. JHP is good with the 4.7 gr. load of Titegroup. The Speer #4478 JHP is reported to open up the best among the hollow point .45 acps in ballistic gelatin. Use 1.200 inches COL and the light taper crimp for a close in, personal combat load.
    ...................
    Thinking John Browning had originally suggested 200 gr. bullets for the 1911. And the extra 30 gr. (230 gr. total) were to meet the "stop a horse" requirement added on by the army.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2008
  6. Steve C

    Steve C Member

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    Tightgroup is fine for lower velocity target loads as its a pretty fast powder. For duplicating full power mill spec ball or self defense loads use Unique, Universal or AA#5. A 230gr Remington FMJ on top of 6.0grs of Unique gives me 850fps from a Government model 1911.
     
  7. tjj

    tjj Member

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    I run 4.4 Titegroup with 230gr Berrys through my Sig P220. Fairly accurate but a bit dirty. Good practice round.
     
  8. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    5.5gr/5.6gr W231 under a 230gr Jacketed bullet will make you very happy IMO.
     
  9. Shoney

    Shoney Member

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    OOOOhhhhh!!!!!!! The continuing urban myth of “cant shoot lead in a polygonal barrel”. It started with kabooms in Glocks, because of their unsupported barrels and lack of frequent scrubbing. Glock’s research showed a build up of lead at the point of head-spacing caused the cartridges to be progressively set farther back in the chamber as more rounds were fired, and the design of the older Glocks allowed them to still fire (fire out of battery). The leading of the chamber in combination with the increased pressure of the lead in the barrel causes the case to rupture. I am unaware of this happening in newer Glocks and Glocks with better supported chambers.

    I have shot about 10,000 medium velocity loads with hard cast lead bullets in my HK USP40c polygonal barrel. I read my HK manual several times, it states reloads will invalidate the warrantee but cannot find a warning against shooting lead in the weapon. I shoot as many as 200 rounds before cleaning without any noticeable change in accuracy or performance, but prefer to clean after every 100 rounds to be on the safe side. I use the Frontier metal cleaner and am impressed by it, as it takes less than 30 seconds and I’m shooting again.
    http://www.big45metalcleaner.com/

    Try your pet load in the HK and watch for signs of leading, then clean.
    Good Shooting!!!
     
  10. SASS#23149

    SASS#23149 Member

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    FWIW,I"ve learned that starting loads are almost alwasy very anemic and now start with mid-level loads as my starting point.
     
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