Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Issue with using powder measure and loading block

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by janobles14, Aug 21, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. janobles14

    janobles14 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,095
    so heres my problem...

    i use a standard 50 round loading block that one might get at any gun store. it is 5x10 round and i would guess about 7"x11". i was recently given a lee perfect powder measure and thought i would try it out. the accuracy of this thing is nothing short of exceptional! once i got a rhythm down i was able to really crank out the loads when i did them 10 at a time. here is where the problem surfaced.

    the stand isnt recessed enough to charge the rounds outside of the outer rows. has anyone figured anything out that will allow someone to freely move the entire block around and charge all the cases? maybe i just missed something and am blind in my frustrations!

    i really like the speed and accuracy of the lee measure but am annoyed that i cant use my full block.

    please help!

    thanks!
     
  2. T Bran

    T Bran Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2010
    Messages:
    920
    Location:
    Homestead FL
    janobles14
    I have never used that method of charging cases. Normally I use 2 blocks one to hold primed cases the other for completed rounds after charging a case I immediately seat a bullet then place the completed cartridge in the second block. I would be afraid of accidentally skipping a case if using a different method. However if you feel confident doing it that way get 2 pieces of angle iron and extend the bottom of the mounting bracket outwards or just bend a piece of .25x2'' flatbar to your desired setback.
    Best of luck

    T
     
  3. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    7,429
    Location:
    East TN
    I load that way all the time, although I usually have to turn the block around after charging three rows.

    I believe the answer to your problem is make a new stand for your powder measure or buy a new powder measure that comes with a stand with a deeper throat.

    All of my powder measures are mounted on their own free standing floor stand so that vibrations from the reloading bench do not upset the powder column. The last one I built has a throat large enough so that I can charge all five rows without changing the position of the loading block in my hand.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2011
  4. mbopp

    mbopp Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    919
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    My Redding measure is mounted on the edge of my bench. But the 2X4 support under the bench top only lets me charge 3 rows at a time, I just turn the loading block the other way and finish the last 2 rows.
    I charge 50 cases, the visually inspect the powder level under a good light. I tried mounting the measure on my turret press but didn't like the idea of not being able to verify the powder charge in each case before seating a bullet.
     
  5. res45

    res45 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    564
    Location:
    North Carolina
    I don't charge cases in the block,I place all my case both rifle and pistol in a separate container on the left side of the powder measure and as each case is charged with either my Lil Dandy or RCBS DUO Measure it is them placed in the loading block on my right side.

    It's the way I have always done it and it helps eliminate the problem of double charges.
     
  6. Steve C

    Steve C Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Messages:
    4,701
    Here is my procedure and quality control measures when using a single stage loader and a loading block.

    As re-sized and prepped cases are hand primed I place them all upside down in the block (primer up). Then pick them up one at a time and charge them from the powder measure and place them back in the block upright, this keeps track of what's been charged and what is left to charge. Every 10th throw is checked on the scale.

    Once all the cases have been charged and are sitting in the block they get a visual check under a good light for powder and level. Any charge level that looks off is checked on the scale and thrown again if necessary.

    Bullets then get seated and rounds go into a box.
     
  7. jcwit

    jcwit Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2007
    Messages:
    8,011
    Location:
    Great state of Indiana
    What Steve said.
     
  8. sage5907

    sage5907 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,282
    Location:
    Wild & Free Oklahoma
    I never liked the idea of putting powder in a large group of cases at the same time before installing the bullets. To me you're just looking for trouble. I personally weigh each charge, put the powder in a case, look into the case to confirm the powder level, and then go directly to the bullet seating die and seat the bullet. I have known more than one novice reloader who has seated bullets in a case without powder. Popping a bullet into the rifleing and then firing another bullet behind it is a good way to get a big surprise. The second problem is that if you're using a powder that doesn't fill up the void in the case you could double charge a case and get another big surprice. Safety comes first even it takes a little longer. BW
     
  9. dbarnhart

    dbarnhart Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2011
    Messages:
    527
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    I believe that the RCBS powder measure stand provides enough clearance to do what you are asking. RCBS used to make an 'extension bracket' (for lack of a better word) that provided even more clearance. Here is the one from Hornady:

    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/default.aspx?productNumber=828213

    You could easily fabricate something similar.

    I used to load 45 ACP this way. After charging, it was easy to set the loading block on the bench, scan the cases, and verify no double-charge.
     
  10. beatledog7

    beatledog7 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    Messages:
    5,093
    Location:
    Tidewater
    I could charge the cases while they're in the block since my measure outlet sits below bench level and allows enough clearance, but much like Steve, I do one at a time.

    I start with 50 ready-to-charge in the block. I was not putting them in primer side up, but I will now. Good tip!

    For the first 5-10 rounds I weigh the case, throw the charge directly into it, and weigh it again to calculate the delta and thus verify the charge. If it's right, I place it in the block. If not, I pour it all back into the measure and try again, adjusting the throw as required. (Trickling is annoying to me.)

    After getting three or four in a row to throw just right, I continue but weighing only every fifth case (easy to keep track as I use a block that has rows of 5). I readjust if required, but my Hornady is very consistent once set. When all 50 are charged, I visually inspect the whole block to ensure no cases are empty or doubled then seat all fifty bullets before I leave the bench.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2011
  11. ranger335v

    ranger335v Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2006
    Messages:
    3,797
    I've charged most of my loads directly into cases sitting in the block for decades, then "eyeballing" the powder column for consistancy before moving on. Never had an over or under charge.

    I don't have that measure (or stand) but I believe it is a good rig. If you can't charge three rows in the block then you need a different stand or a smaller block.
     
  12. mahansm

    mahansm Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Messages:
    311
    Location:
    Panama City, Florida
    If you're using an electronic scale, just tare the scale with the fresh primed, uncharged case. After charging, the scale will read out the weight of the powder charge directly, eliminating the sometimes error prone calculation. My scale will perform the tare function in about 3 seconds.

    As an occasional added check, you can dump the charge and reweigh to be sure you see 0.0 on the readout
     
  13. beatledog7

    beatledog7 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    Messages:
    5,093
    Location:
    Tidewater
    mahanasm, sounds good, but it requires weighing every case and taring the scale 50 times for 50 rounds. If the goal is to make each round exact, as one would for target competition, it's a perfect way of doing so without any math.

    The calculation I do is quite simple as I know my measure throws within a couple tenths. All I have to do is figure out what the tenths reading has to be. For example, if the case weighs 66.3gr and I'm charging with 4.3gr of powder, I just look for the scale to read xx.6 and I know I'm good. Every five rounds I recheck vice every single round, and no retaring required.
     
  14. jcwit

    jcwit Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2007
    Messages:
    8,011
    Location:
    Great state of Indiana
    Not a good tried and true way to do it, way to much varience in case weight. But if you think it works for you then I guess you can do it.

    This is why you visiually check each case on the block with a hand held flashlight. Done it this way for decades with out a problem.

    I reloaded 500 rounds last night starting at 10:00, if I weighed each charge I wouldn't be done till 3:00 AM. This is why I own a powder measure and an Auto Disk for handgun calibers.
     
  15. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    7,429
    Location:
    East TN
    Yes, after charging all the cases in a loading block I verify that there is powder in every case and at approximately the same level. Any case that looks too full or not full enough gets dumped and recharged. This rarely happens though as I get great consistency with my powder measures.

    Like jcwit, been checking cases this way for decades.
     
  16. Cherokee

    Cherokee Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2003
    Messages:
    467
    Location:
    Medina, Ohio
    What "cfullgraf" said. Been doing it for 50 years.
     
  17. BADUNAME37

    BADUNAME37 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2008
    Messages:
    4,434
    I have the RCBS Powder Measure and RCBS PM Stand. Frankford Arsenal reloading blocks (blue) work perfectly, just enter the block under the PM from the two long-sides.

    No problems at all.

    I agree with others that, being able to visually compare the depth of powder in all 50 cartridges allows one to be sure the powder level is exactly the same. If loading only one at a time and putting a pill onto the case, there is really no way that I know of to compare each loaded case to every other loaded case!
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
  18. JimKirk

    JimKirk Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,899
    Location:
    Nicholls,GA South Georgia
    I've been doing the same for 40 + years ...

    Jimmy K
     
  19. algrayjr

    algrayjr Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Plant City, Fl
    Power Measure/Loading Block

    Try hanging your stand from a shelf above the bench. The power measure
    will be completely clear under the drop and you can touch every slot in a 50 or 100 slot tray. Cheers!:neener:

    Thats up side down for those that dont get it.!
     
  20. chrt396

    chrt396 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2010
    Messages:
    418
    Location:
    Tampa Bay
    RCBS makes a table top mounted stand that should work. You do three rows...turn block around and do the other two.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page