Quantcast

Ithaca 37 questions

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by Parke1, Oct 19, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. kidaquarius

    kidaquarius Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2010
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Michigan
    Restoring Ithaca

    While my grandpa is in Florida, I figured I would do him a solid and fix up an old Ithaca 12-gauge he owns.

    A little history on the gun (according to my gramps)..

    It was produced in 1938 at Ithaca Guns (serial #5244) and he traded a few haircuts for it back in 1939.

    Him and my grandma (now passed away) "killed alot of game with that gun, son" (quote from him) and I wanted to fix it up because it holds a lot of sentimental value to him.

    Here's the problem, he let his son (my uncle) take it out in the field one day to hunt some bird and he carried it nose-down, plugging the barrel with dirt.
    Well, my uncle ended up firing the gun (not knowing it was plugged) and put a bulge in the barrel about 3/4 of the way down.

    I called Ithaca today and they wanted $405 to remove the old barrel, machine the receiver, insert an adapter and replace the barrel. They would re-blue the gun too.

    Sure with $405 he could go buy a new shotgun, but I really want to fix it up for him. I know he would love it.

    I want to take a few birds with it before he's gone.

    Here's a picture of the gun:
    DSC_0403.gif

    What does everyone think about the idea?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Deadbolt

    Deadbolt Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Kalifornistan, USSA
    Hey Kid. Sup - this is Deadend :lol:
     
  3. kidaquarius

    kidaquarius Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2010
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Michigan
  4. reckless carolinian

    reckless carolinian Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    218
    Location:
    Fletcher, NC
    Cut the barrel? Blasphemy, but perhaps the least expensive fix. Not knowing anything about the new Ithaca gun co., I would have a bit of trepidation about sending them my vintage Model 37. Even if the work was guaranteed to be within a gnat's backside, how are they going to make it right if they botch it? I'm not trying to be snippy about it, but I would think long and hard about sending off a 4 digit S/N M37 to the ministrations of an unknown machine shop.
     
  5. John Peddie

    John Peddie Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
    Messages:
    129
    Location:
    Toronto
    Ithaca experts

    You might want to contact Diamond Gunsmithing in Ithaca NY.

    I understand it's owned and operated by Les Hovencamp, the former long-time head gunsmith at Ithaca, before it relocated to Ohio.

    On these boards, I've heard much good-and no bad-about them.

    http://www.diamondgunsmithing.com/
     
  6. reckless carolinian

    reckless carolinian Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    218
    Location:
    Fletcher, NC
    Good thinking, John. I forgot about Diamond. I'd send my "Ethel" there before I'd send her to Ohio.
     
  7. kidaquarius

    kidaquarius Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2010
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Michigan
    Hey thanks for the heads-up guys.

    I've sent an e-mail to Les at Diamond Gunsmithing about it and he's already replied.

    His reasonable rates, along with his expertise, surely seem to be the way to go about it doing this restoration.

    I would love to get this gun restored. It seems to be a fine firearm and really built to last.
    Hell, the gun is a shade older than 70 years and aside from the bulge it's in great condition.

    I talked to my grandfather about it too and he was fully on-board with the idea.

    He was telling me how in the late 1940's (post WWII, once he was back from the Navy) he and my grandmother took that gun out west on his motorcycle to "live adventurously" for awhile.

    Now, as unbelievable as this sounds, on that trip my grandmother took down a mule deer while riding on the back of the motorcycle.
    Both the motorcycle and deer where in motion at the time.
    That may sound like a fish story, but my grandfather isn't the fish story kind of guy.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2010
  8. Southpaw 02

    Southpaw 02 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2009
    Messages:
    46
    Location:
    S. E. Va CSA
    Nooo, please don't cut the barrel.


    Here is another suggestion, talk to Frank at Sycamore Hills Design.

    www.sycamorehilldesigns.com

    He will be a little more expensive but he does good work. Don't get me wrong here. the work that Les does is first rate.

    To change the subject I have heard nothing but good things about the new Ithaca Gun co. I understand the new ones rival the supreme model That said, for a 1938 gun I might send it to Les knowing his background.

    Wow I didn't realize this was my first post. I must lurk to much!

    SP
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2010
  9. tactikel

    tactikel Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Messages:
    1,225
    Location:
    Northeastern Illinois
    Kidaquarius, Do not cut down this gun! You have one of the finest pumpguns ever made, with family history, and can restore it for a few hundred bucks? Please keep the gun, save the money, and have Ithaca restore it - for YOUR grandkids!
    I have my Grandpa's Rem Mod 17 (the same basic gun) made in 1930, and shoot it all the time, I take Pheasant, Grouse, and Woodcock with it-to remember and honor him!
     
  10. kidaquarius

    kidaquarius Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2010
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Michigan
    I do not plan on cutting it down.
    If it wasn't my gramp's gun, I might consider it.
    His gun though- never.
     
  11. WFR

    WFR Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2007
    Messages:
    43
    Need value on a Deerslayer quickly!

    95% Deerslayer with 20" barrel. Made in the early 80's I believe.
    Front sight is intact and bluing is very good.
    A few places on the wood are peeling but otherwise very nice.
    Guy is asking $350.
    Fair price or would $300 be more the norm?
    My Blue Book which is a few years old shows it @ $300 for 100% condition.
    \
    Also, I've seen both 20" and 26" versions. Which are more desireable?
     
  12. BerettaRacer

    BerettaRacer Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2003
    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    Sid Bell Edition?

    Hi,
    I've got a line on, what I'm being told, is an early 80's Sid Bell 37, chambered in 3", none of it verified yet, other than seeing the grip cap in a picture.
    My question is, what makes it a Sid Bell? What differences are there other than a grip cap? lol And how much more are they worth over a standard 37? etc etc?
    Thx
    Bill R
     
  13. Rob W

    Rob W Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Forestock removal?

    I'd like to remove the slide from the wood forestock. I see the typical sloted ring (for a flat tool) but it doesn't budge. I can see threads on the inner tube nearest the slide. Do I twist that end instead?
     
  14. Milkmaster

    Milkmaster Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Messages:
    2,156
    Location:
    Murfreesboro, TN
    The ring you speak of does indeed unscrew off the tube that goes up the center of the wooden forend. A spanner wrench is best to use, but it can be done differently. I will mention that you should not attemp to remove the wood unless you have already removed the forend assembly entirely from the gun. DOind this makes the process much easier and help you not to break the wooden piece by accident. After you remove the forend, you can use a flat piece of metal across the slots in the metal ring to unscrew it.

    When you reinstall the ring ...make sure the small indention is lined up with the barrel or you will have difficulties reassembling the gun barrel.

    good luck!
     
  15. Rob W

    Rob W Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    trigger disassembly

    Thanks Milkmaster, I've tried it again but I might have to leave it soak overnight cause I bent the piece of metal that I was using.

    Another issue that I need help with is the trigger disassembly. I imagine that I can get it disassembled but re-assembled?

    I've got a field maintenance manual for the model-37 which does go through the breech block dis and re-assembly but not the trigger.

    Anyone?
     
  16. Milkmaster

    Milkmaster Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Messages:
    2,156
    Location:
    Murfreesboro, TN
    I hope your are talking about the trigger assembly. If you are going to take the small miniature parts of the assembly apart, then you have my regrets. If it is working, then just spray solvent into the assembly and work it to get the crud out. Then lubricate it as an assembly. Finally, spray it out with compressed air to get the excess oil out of it and put it back into the gun.

    The trigger assembly can be removed as a whole by removing the stock and pushing out the side pins.

    Hope this helps!
     
  17. Rob W

    Rob W Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Yup, that's what I was talking about. Before this project, the trigger wouldn't pull and the safety was stuck in safe. I've managed to use a dental pick to get most of the crude out and it works now. I was hoping for a complete disassemble but we'll go with as is for now.

    BTW, got the ring off the forend. I did shed some blood and cused three times.
     
  18. Milkmaster

    Milkmaster Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Messages:
    2,156
    Location:
    Murfreesboro, TN
    I think the remedy is to say 10 Hail Mary's and put a 20 in the plate for that!
     
  19. Youngster

    Youngster Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2003
    Messages:
    987
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    Just bought a nice old 28" MOD choked '37, serial number is 704XXX, what's that make it, a 1958?
     
  20. Al LaVodka

    Al LaVodka member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,040
    Sure Granny and the Mule Deer were both moving. But the damned Muley shouldn't have been driving the motorcycle (at leat not so fast) and he got what he deserved in my opinion!

    And who really cares if Ithaca replaces the barrel or the bad one is cut? Is it that important to keep the unusable if not dangerous reminder of really irresponsible gun handling in the family for posterity? It is!? Then cut the barrel and keep both halves. The shame was in destroying the barrel in the first place and is not in salvaging it and the gun at this point if you still want "a shooter." All these actions are the things that make antiques more and more valuable over time. Sorry. The damage is already done. Move on.

    Al
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2010
  21. docnyt

    docnyt Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,284
    Location:
    HeArT of DiXiE
    Add me to the club!

    Local gun show find. Supposedly a WW2 trench gun, but the serial number traces it to 1949 manufacture. Has the heat shield and bayonet attachment. Came with a 1917 style bayonet with OD green sheath too.

    IMG_2789.gif

    There's a stamp on the receiver, "W B". Not sure what if it was the inspector.

    IMG_2773.gif

    There is an inscription partially hidden by the heat shield:

    IMG_2774.gif

    And no, I didn't "bubba" it. The AR grip bipod is just there to support it.

    IMG_2771.gif

    Serial number is 2563XX. Probably not used in any war, but who knows. The guy I bought it from didn't know anything about its history. The price was OK I guess - $750 - with the bayonet, leather sling and cheap NCStar soft case.
     
  22. Black_Talon

    Black_Talon Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2003
    Messages:
    863
    Location:
    Peoples Republik of California
    While it's not an original (or even a Vietnam version) it sure looks like it has some honest wear on it. Would probably be interesting to know where it's been for the past 60 years.
     
  23. Ryanjb01

    Ryanjb01 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2008
    Messages:
    2
    I have a Ithaca 20g mo 87 serial number 369672. I am trying to figure out what year it is. please help. I thought it may be a 1951?

    Thanks,
     
  24. monduconstruct

    monduconstruct Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2010
    Messages:
    80
    Location:
    Boston (unfortunately)
    Hey I in no way want to alter the course of this discussion - but I'm very unfamiliar with the Ithaca series of guns. I read through a lot of this post and am intrigued. They have the Ithaca Model 37 Defense gun ... does anyone have a clue how this would compare to a 870P for instance? Seems like most people are buying their older guns, are the newer ones not so desirable?

    Thanks!
     
  25. JNewell

    JNewell Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2003
    Messages:
    2,714
    Location:
    Land of the Bean & the Cod
    The newer ones are not as desireable because, among other things, Ithaca as a real company went out of business years ago and has been shot around the ice like a hockey puck as a brand name for a while. Sadly, this is becoming true of all of our gun manufacturers. The 37 is a great gun but as a HD tool it's really a niche item. Nomex on, flame away. ;)
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice