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It's 1940, what's your CCW?

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by NIGHTLORD40K, Apr 17, 2018.

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  1. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    A shillelagh. And a Webley.

    And most likely a pint.
     
  2. tbob38
    • Contributing Member

    tbob38 Contributing Member

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    I suppose maybe a Mauser HSc. Brand new, just traded in my 1934 model.
     
  3. drobs

    drobs Member

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    Which S&W uses 45 acp and 1/2 moon clips?
     
  4. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Demi-human

    Sure you're a fine fellow and all and I can see the shillelagh (one out of blackthorn will do nicely), and the Webley (make mine a Bulldog if you please), but don't you think the local constabulary might have something to say about the pint your carrying?
     
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  5. Striker

    Striker Member

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    Not if it's single malt Irish in his pint flask.
     
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  6. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Striker

    Ah, there you have it! Can't have him wanderin' 'round the countryside with a pint of Guinness in his hand; might spill a drop or two should he be forced to defend himself!

    Now that's a fine choice if ever there was one! Might I recommend Bushmills 16 Year Old Single Malt Irish Whisky for this fellow's flask then.
     
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  7. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    That's why It's concealed.;)

    Though, I hear they can smell Whiskeybo like a pig can smell truffels!:D
     
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  8. Bama59

    Bama59 Member

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    1930s Colt .38 Detective Special
     
  9. Dr.Rob

    Dr.Rob Moderator Staff Member

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    Clothes were worn differently then. Dress belts, if worn at all, were skinny. Braces or suspenders were still very popular. So I'd wager a smaller pistol for ccw on my hip like a 1908 Colt 380.

    Colt 38 super would be my preference if I could sort a proper way of carrying it without looking out of place.

    New Service Colt belongs in the hidden glove box. That thing is way too big for ccw.

    Phillips Marlowe usually packed a Luger.
     
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  10. Chevelle SS

    Chevelle SS Member

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    5" N frame in 44 special
     
  11. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Dr. Rob

    I can certainly see the need for suspenders, especially with carrying some of the all steel handguns and all leather holsters around in your pants pocket! When I bought my Colt Pocket Hammerless Model 1908 it came with a Heiser Pocket Holster very similar to the one pictured here, only a bit smaller. Made from relatively thick leather it weighed more like it was two holsters rather than just one!

    It also had what I presume to be a tab for affixing the holster to a button in your pants pocket and a small metal clip on the inside of the holster to hold the trigger guard to possibly keep the gun from falling out of the holster. All very functional, albeit heavy, back in 1940.

    GvsfUds.jpg
     
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  12. Dr.Rob

    Dr.Rob Moderator Staff Member

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    When your waist band is up at your navel I think a New Service is impractical on your hip without braces.

    I've seen all manner of those pocket holsters, the button hole is to keep the holster in your pocket on the draw.
     
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  13. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    A shillelagh, I carry. But I partner it with an M1911.
     
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  14. Striker

    Striker Member

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    That would be alcohol abuse.
     
  15. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    To be certain, I'd love to have one of those fancy American pistols, but me family are savin' our shillings to get outta this shebang in Dublin and into a flat in Roscommon. They say the Germans have gone dÚsachtach and are bombing London to bits. 'Tis just me and the children, so I'm headed to the country. There's a hidden ammuntition factory there. At least I can send our boys lead, if'n I can't be there with them.

    An for sure, that was a compliment I made to me constables. As a helpful and sharing sort of man, I'm always willin' to give sample of me homemade!:)
     
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  16. mikey98e

    mikey98e Member

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    What he said. A New York reload. Just like I carry now. Except now I have the advantage of lighter weight. I carry a 642 and a 638.
    -mike
     
  17. kBob

    kBob Member

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    drobs,

    Just what was said..... the Model 1917. The US military called both substitute standard WWI revolvers, one made by Colt and the other by S&W, the Model of 1917. Confusing but hey it seemed like a good idea at the time. Both used half moon (three shot) clips to allow extraction of the .45 ACP rimless cartridge. Some of the first of the Colts had chambers basically bored through so the cartridges did not seat on the case mouth as is standard for the .45 ACP, but on the clip that was snapped into the set of three cartridges extractor groove. My understanding is that the S&Ws where properly chambered from day one and in an emergency (emergency, everyone to get from streets) individual rounds can be fed into the individual chambers and fired. I did this once just to see and it worked on my pistol.......on attempting to extract one cartridge case fell from the gun two came out with finger nails and the remaining three had to be driven out with a yellow Faber #2 pencil with a bit of force.

    Loading two three shot clips is generally faster than trying to load six individual cartridges, but slower than a modern speed loader. There have been for a few decades "Full Moon Clips" that hold a full course of six rounds and those are very fast. The three rounders have a tendency to bend and then when reused bind up the action or at least give irregular trigger pulls. I have not managed to have this issue with the full moon clips....but those six shot clips were not around in 1940. Loading the clip is a pain in the gazoot and the Army shipped loaded clips as an option. UNLOADING the clips to reuse is a double pain in the gazoot! There are a number of tools on the market for these purposes. A few years back some folks made plastic full moon clips.....as an old fart I am uncomfortable with them as those I have tried seemed to hold the ammo very loosely.

    Both Colt and S&W M 1917 revolvers use the same clips.....as in my experience do the cut Webleys that should not be fired with full house .45ACP loads.

    There is also the M25 S&W Target revolver that uses the clips and .45 ACP in some models. (some Dash models are for .45 Colt (Yes other old guys I did not say Long Colt just to avoid conflict with folks that say no such cartridge exists. We know and will keep it to our selves , eh?))

    -kBob
     
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  18. drobs

    drobs Member

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    Thanks KBob - looks like I left the "M" off my original post.

    I had a S&W M1917 & M25-5 (IIRC) pass through my hands 15 or so years ago. Should've held on to both. This was few years before they skyrocketed in value. Both were pristine and bought for under $500 and sold for around the same. Sold the 25-5 to a friend and used the $ to buy a Vector Uzi right when the AW ban ended. The 1917 went to another friend.
     
  19. Dr.Rob

    Dr.Rob Moderator Staff Member

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    The advantage the big new service had was 38/44 heavy duty loads didn't phase it in 38, and the frame was a natural for the new .357 magnum as well as hot loaded 45 Colt. But even with a 4 inch barrel, it's a BIG gun. A six inch OP feels half the size, though it's still heavy.
     
  20. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    The New Service was the biggest cartridge revolver Colt ever made. Internet "experts" sometimes claim you need extra large hands to shoot it, but people with normal hands can handle it quite well.
     
  21. Sistema1927

    Sistema1927 Member

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    I think that most of us would have been disappointed, not in our choices, but in our ability to purchase what was available.

    The United States, and most of the world, was coming out of the Great Depression in 1940. Unless you came from a wealthy family or were a gangster, your purchasing power was quite small. The post-war boom of the 50's led to a situation where we could drive new cars, own our own homes, and have discretionary income to buy firearms and ammunition.
     
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  22. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    By 1940, the Depression was essentially over and there were manufacturing jobs opening up faster than they could be filled as wartime demand sparked the economy. On the other side of the coin, pawn shops were filled with fine handguns that sold for pennies on the dollar.
     
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  23. kBob

    kBob Member

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    What Vern Said.

    One of my high school buddies/ DeMolay Brothers got commissioned in the USMC and had the devil of a time making minimum with a 1911A1. His Colonel told him to "Get something you can shoot GI.45 Ball in!" As he was the guy whose Dad had the Victory model .38 Special I wrote about last week I said "Hmmm" and got him a pair of 1917s to try out.....one of each. I figured he would take one and I would be "stuck" with the other. Well he shot well with both and on return to The Corps after leave qualified with the Colt highly and with the S&W better than he had ever done with the 1911A1. He took them on a Med cruise and wore them both ashore, the Colt in a shoulder holster and the S&W on his belt and an old WWII first aid kit pouch full of loaded half moons. He wore his Randall #2 on the other hip which the Italians immediately called a Gladius. The two guns and BHK (big honking knife) were definite attention getters with the various host nations when ashore.

    Point being he was the smallest guy in my "gang" and the Colt 1917 was his favorite handgun and he generally shot classic one handed hold.

    BTW in the late 1970's both were under $200 a piece, the Colt going for close to that and the S&W about $40 less.

    -kBob
     
  24. Pilot

    Pilot Member

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    Commercial P-08 Luger.
     
  25. BobWright

    BobWright Member

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    As to the times, I heard many men say they bought guns, from individuals or pawn shops, for $8.00 to $10.00 apiece.

    My buddies Dad had an Iver Johnson he paid $8.00 for. An eldery aunt of mine (actually former aunt, she being my uncle's widow) had a Colt Police Positive she bought for $10.00 or so.

    This aunt of mine kept the gun on a drum table atop her Bible. She answered ever ring of the telephone, whether it was her ring or not. She was well informed!

    Bob Wright
     
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