It's not the gun, it's you

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by d31tc, Aug 8, 2022.

  1. d31tc

    d31tc Member

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    OK, accidentally posted without finishing the post, so here's the edit.

    Last year we ran this competition and had enough fun to do it again. A competition where everyone brings their gun with enough ammo for everyone else to shoot a shot group with that gun. The person with the worst group get's the beautiful traveling trophy to proudly display in their office. The traveling trophy moved on to a different person, and that person was not me. I shot the best again this year.

    This year, I actually got to shoot an M1911A1 that I got from the CMP, so there was lots of nostalgia. I shot the best group. The winner of the trophy shot a 22" group, which was reminiscent of how some of the soldiers would shoot.

    Why? The back story (from last year's post): Back in the day, every so often our platoon would be tasked with running the pistol qualification range for the battalion. Our sidearm for most tankers at the time were old(ish) 1911A1's, which had seen some use. The slides would rattle a little. Anyway, invariably we would have newer shooters who would shoot and shot gun 45 Cal at the target, coming no where near qualifying expert. Invariably, they would blame the gun. "How can they expect us to hit anything with these pieces of junk?". My platoon sergeant would grab a magazine, lock and load, and proceed to put them all in the black in rapid fire, and hand the pistol back to the private, with the only comment - "It's you."



    Another fun day at the range.

    Trophy.jpg
    It's You Scores.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2022
  2. stillquietvoice
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    stillquietvoice Contributing Member

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    Sounds like a fun day at the range.
     
  3. d31tc

    d31tc Member

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    OK, lot's of edits when I accidentally posted. I think the hasty edits gets to the point . And I don't post enough to be proficient so I screwed up my edits and had to edit my edits...o_O. Oops. And I have to edit the title.
     
  4. Reloadron
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    Reloadron Contributing Member

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    It's not the gun, it's you.

    Been wondering about that of late. Funny how the once clear and sharp sights on my 1911 and other guns including revolvers have become sort of fuzzy? How do sights do that anyway? Likewise my once sub 0.5 MOA rifle groups using the same loads in the same rifles are now over 1.0 MOA? Maybe the guns are just getting old? No way could it be me. Absolutely no way! :) On the bright side while things are not what they once were my love of shooting has not diminished. :)

    Ron
     
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  5. d31tc

    d31tc Member

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    Interesting note on my new to me 1945 Remington Rand M1911A1. I've been shooting it to see where it hits relative to point of aim. At 15 yards, I was consistently getting 2" to 3" groups. The goal for the competition was to set up at a distance that all shooters, regardless of skill, could hit their target to be able to measure the groups. Well, I went out to 25 yards and you would think that groups would be about 5". Well you'd be wrong. The gun wouldn't keep them on an 11x17 target. I agree with Reloadron - no way it could be me...:). Absolutely no way!

    However, if I have to be honest, I'm guessing the smaller sight picture had me focusing too much on the target and not the front sight and I was chasing the target. So 15 yards it was for the competition.
     
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  6. Reloadron
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    Reloadron Contributing Member

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    I have a Remington Rand 1911A1 1942 GI pistol also and picking up the sight picture and sight alignment with the low profile GI sights is a major project anymore for me. The same is true for any of my GI copies. I can do much better with any of my Colt Governet Series 70 guns, especially the Gold Cup versions verse the GI guns. I am due for new corrective lenses. I enjoyed great vision till around 50 but today at 72 the vision is a challenge. When I was young, real young, I never understood the need for a scope on a rifle, today scopes are my new best friends. Hopefully new glasses will help. :)

    Ron
     
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  7. Mars5l

    Mars5l Member

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    I'd do a competition like that, just to try different guns
     
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  8. d31tc

    d31tc Member

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    I have a pair of computer glasses which I also use when shooting at the range that focus pretty well on the front sights and allows decent enough vision on the target, . Not a very practical solution for shooting when not at the range though. I'm 55, which my daughter tells me is "elderly". She is 11. But I usually feel pretty young for my age.
     
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  9. d31tc

    d31tc Member

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    Yeah, it's fun. We were supposed to have 8 people, but life got in the way for 4 of them at the last minute.

    But the 4 who made it, also brought more guns. In addition to the guns used for the competition, I brought my S&W 3913NL which shot way better than my M1911A1. Another guy brought his Charles Daly 1911 and a Beretta 96. Another guy brought his 2011 and a competition bolt action 22LR which was super accurate and fun to shoot (I forgot the make and model). We went through a good amount of ammo passing them around after the official competition was done.
     
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  10. Remington1911

    Remington1911 Member

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    There is a clip from heart break ridge, the Clint eastwood movie where he does just that. I can't link it as it has naughty words in it.
     
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  11. Shanghai McCoy

    Shanghai McCoy Member

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    I like the trophy with the barn. Nice touch... :thumbup:
     
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  12. d31tc

    d31tc Member

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    Maybe SFC Wilson borrowed that line via a midnight requisition since it looks like Heartbreak Ridge was released in 1986. Our ranges would have been in the 1990 to 1993 timeframe - definitely post dates the movie. Would have been cool if the movie got it from SFC Wilson:cool:, but we were Army tankers, not gung ho marines. And we definitely weren't Hollywood material (well, I wasn't) :uhoh:.
     
  13. murf

    murf Member

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    funny, i said that [it's never the gun] to my grandson last month when i gave him my mkI ruger pistol. i said that same thing to my brother when he got my mkIII a few years back. no sense in wasting time on baseless excuses.

    it's not the gun,

    murf
     
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  14. Remington1911

    Remington1911 Member

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    I was talking about this on another forum, and I would say it fits in here with this.

    If every other gun is fine, and you can shoot every other gun well, but one is just going to defy all reason, it could be the gun.

    Story time.

    I have bought two new 10-22 in my life. I don't currently own those, but one other I got on trade thinking I would move it down the road.

    The one in question would not hit paper. Could not for the life of me figure it out. To make a long story short a buddy that was playing with it said the barrel has to be bent.....the hell you say, how often have you seen that. Well never, but it has to be, I know I can shoot better then this. We are shooting at a full sized silhouette, on a white background. Flip it over and it is a big white nothing on it paper sheet. You could take a pen with the barrel flat on the paper and draw a line with the pen next to the paper....kinda trace the barrel, run it along the edge of the barrel. I hope I explained that well. You could look at the drawing and go....that is bent. Can't be, it must be the table we drew it....it is an 8' wood pick nick table. We took said gun back to the shop with a nice long bench and did it again, sure enough bent. Then if you looked down the length of it you could see it, and you could not unsee it. How could we have missed this....it was just that in your face. Back to ruger it went with a photo of said drawing, and a pic of the me holding the rifle shot from the business end. You could see the ) in the barrel.

    Ruger replaced the barrel no questions asked naturally, again that fantastic customer service we hear so much about, and I traded the rifle away vowing that with two brand new out of the box I was off the 1022 for life. First one had a visible crack in the receiver, back to wally world you go, This is what I get for assuming something new from the factory would have a visible crack in the reciever, thank god he never shot it, but what a upset little boy. Imagine that on your birthday, you finally get your very own rifle yours from brand new, and that is what it is out of the box. Yea never again.

    So I guess after that long story unless it is a ruger its not the gun its you :)
     
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  15. Pudge

    Pudge Member

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    I think it more likely, the movie borrowed from real life. Dad shared a similar story from when he and several other newly minted lieutenants (in probably 1967/8) were shooting very poorly with their 1911's. They all couldn't be that bad, had to be the gun. Lots of disparigment of John Browning's creation. Until the Sgt picked up one of their handguns, and proceeded to quickly produce a very tight group. The Sgt never spoke, and the officers quit their complaining.
     
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  16. starnbar

    starnbar Member

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    (I saw Joe Benner do that one tIme many many years ago.)
     
  17. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    The average Ruger 10/22 barrel is for the rock buster who never cleans their rifle. My factory barrel, you could rock the round in the chamber by pressing on the side of the rim . My Volquartsen barrel, on the same receiver, is a much more accurate tube. Still, the tube ought to be straight.

    Even custom barrels have their problems, on gundrilled barrels, the hole between the ends wanders. If you notice, barrel makers only guarantee their barrels are concentric as measured at the ends. A bud of mine purchased a expensive custom barrel for F Class and during zeroing he found the point of impact was so much (left or right I don't remember) that he ran out of scope adjustment. He sent it back to the smith for another. The smith told me another customer was willing to use the barrel, at a bargain price, if the gunsmith would rotate the barrel such that, instead of shooting off axis laterally, the barrel could be orientated to shoot high. As the customer was another 1000 yard F class shooter, not having to use a lot of elevation adjustments at 1000 yards was just fine. The customer was happy with the barrel accuracy and consistency.

    I do have a Swedish M1896 from the 1920's that looks absolutely new. Which is why I purchased it. There is a reason it looks hardly used, the point of impact moves within five rounds way the heck up. Like feet at 100 yards. As the barrel warms, it changes point of impact badly. Barrels were "straightened" at military arsenals, and I guess this is one with a lot of interior stresses.

    etv0fXo.jpg


    oof1tIG.jpg

    I got to play with one of those barrel straightening fixtures at Springfield Armory Museum. It did not take much pressure to see the shadow move inside the barrel. If you notice, the straightener has the middle of the barrel aimed at a target that gives a dark shadow in the barrel. If the lines are crooked, the hole was not drilled straight.
     
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  18. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    Give Jon a bat.
     
  19. Remington1911

    Remington1911 Member

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    I love how he is doing it by eye.
     
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  20. d31tc

    d31tc Member

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    This made me laugh hard, which isn’t good since I had hernia repair surgery on Monday:rofl:.

    But Mike A, the holder of the trophy for the last year, appreciated Jon’s horrible marksmanship.
     
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  21. BLACKHAWKNJ

    BLACKHAWKNJ Member

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    My Army experience was that on a scale of 1-10 marksmanship training came in at about 70, in my 4 years of active duty 1967-1971 after BCT I went to the rifle range THREE times and only fired twice. Dean Grenell said he had a well worn M911 that had "minute of washtub" accuracy, a new barrel and bushing solved that problem. I did not learn to shoot a handgun until I practiced Bullseye-weekly-with my High Standard Victor.
     
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