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Japanese captured Italian Weapons, were they marked??

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by indy1919a4, Jun 22, 2020.

  1. indy1919a4

    indy1919a4 Member

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    When Japan fought against and captured the Italian Garrisons in China during WW II, Does anyone know if those captured rifles were marked in any way by Japan. ??? For that fact what did Japan do with those rifles..???
     
  2. whm1974

    whm1974 member

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    I didn't know that any Italian soldiers were in China in WWII...
     
  3. Sovblocgunfan

    Sovblocgunfan Member

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    I do not believe the small arms were used by Japan, as Japan had their own calibers and chamberings that were pretty unique.

    However, they could have been used with captured ammunition in a reserve or home guard capacity.

    please note, Japan did contract for rifles from Beretta for general issue well before world war 2. These were chambered in Japanese calibers.
     
  4. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

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    Japan bought rifles from Italy. IIRC the IJN couldn't get Arisakas as all production of them went to the Army. I read somewhere these Carcano rifles went largely unissued. They were not captured.
     
  5. theotherwaldo

    theotherwaldo Member

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    I had heard that a number of weapons that had been captured by Japan early in the war were sold to Finland if they did not meet Japanese standards.
     
  6. AlexanderA
    • Contributing Member

    AlexanderA Member

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    Italy and Japan were technically allies at the beginning of WW2. Italy had a concession (outpost) in Tianjin, China, of about 114 acres. This concession was taken over by the Japanese on September 10, 1943, when Italy basically switched sides in the war. Presumably, the Japanese seized the arms of that small Italian garrison. The number could not have been significant.
     
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  7. tark

    tark Member

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    I just learned something.^ :)
     
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  8. indy1919a4

    indy1919a4 Member

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    When you consider those forces Tianjin and Beijing numbered about 700 and then you have the Italian navel submarines and Gunboats and consulates that has to push the number to at least 900+.. Now thats the number of armed men, the rub is always any firearms that were stored.

    Now you have to take some subtractions here because there were numbers of Italians who stayed in the fight for Fascist Italy. But did Japan mark these weapons as captured?? You also have Machine guns and artillery but thats more an NFA question.

    Another thought did any of the Fascist Italian units mark their rifles in addition to show their loyalties. If that did happen the number would be even lower..
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2020
  9. indy1919a4

    indy1919a4 Member

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    Sorry about that.. dup entry
     
  10. .455_Hunter

    .455_Hunter Member

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    Timely video here...



    The situation got interesting when Italy officially switched sides in 1943.
     
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  11. indy1919a4

    indy1919a4 Member

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    Fantastic I love the movin pictures.. Was kinda hoping they would answer the question, but they never got there. There is also a great story in WW II Magazine. It dates back to the early 2000s when they published it.. I will need to dig to find the correct date..
     
  12. mokin

    mokin Member

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    Thanks for the video .455_Hunter. I also learned something today!
     
  13. whm1974

    whm1974 member

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    Well I centrally learn two new things today:
    1. Italy was an ally of Japan during WWII.
    2. Italy had troops in China as well.

    How come I didn't learned this in School?
     
  14. Archie

    Archie Member

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    whm, you weren't paying attention.

    Japan was one of the Axis powers. Italy was one of the Axis powers. Therefore...
     
  15. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    Well, in some fairness, the topic of garrisoned troops in belligerent nations is considered too technical for grade school histories, and often too esoteric for collegiate history.

    If you are invading a nation and you find it occupied by a third nation's troops (at a legation or the like), you typically have two choices, intern them, or have them sling arms and board a neutral transport for home. This can be complicated if the nation involved is allied to your belligerents, then, they are really POWs.

    The Hague is filled with dusty tomes on what the letter of this ought to be. Down to the belligerents to comply.
     
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