JB Weld, screw holes and refinshing.....

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by dogsoldier0513, Nov 23, 2011.

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  1. dogsoldier0513

    dogsoldier0513 Member

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    My S&W 4563TSW is sans the rail, but the (2) screw holes in the dustcover remain. Would it be feasible to fill the holes with JB Weld? If so, will JB Weld accept finishes such as Cerakote, Melonite, etc? If not, can the holes in the dustcover be welded up w/o warping the dustcover? TIA
     
  2. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

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    JB Weld is an improvised repair.

    JB Weld is nothing more than hard plastic.

    If the part is going to be exposed to high heat, or shock, JB Weld is the wrong choice.

    Stainless steel can be welded.
    A welder competent to perform the task neatly on your pistol will charge you serious coin.
    This type of work is "gunsmithing," and will require a FFL unless you stand there the whole time while the welder is doing the work.

    The resale-value of your gun will be diminished, even if the job is done right.
    You already know what it will do to resale-value if the job is done wrong.

    Were it my gun, I would leave the holes alone.
     
  3. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    JB Weld might stand Cerakote, I don't know.
    But I doubt it, as it has to be baked on at 400 degrees or something I think

    It sure as heck wouldn't stand Melonite.
    Melonite is essentially a case hardening process that imparts a very hard finish to steel through nitrogen carburizing in molten salt baths.

    It is applied at a high enough temperature to turn JB Weld into a puff of smoke.
    As it probably would your Ti frame!

    I might consider filling the holes with flush aluminum rivits.
    Once finished with a spray & bake finish, they won't be noticable.
    Or, you could put the rail back on!

    rc
     
  4. BADUNAME37

    BADUNAME37 Member

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    Why not cut two screws of the same thread and insert them (with red Loctite) then carefully file the screws so they are flush with the area surrounding them.

    I did that to an old antique .22 where the front sight was removed. The plug screw was so large, it was catching on everything. Finally, I carefully filed it down flush with the barrel and then blued it and the surrounding barrel and it looks good as new!
     
  5. brickeyee

    brickeyee Member

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    Make some plug screws up and file them off flat (or whatever the shape is around the holes).

    Under any film finish you will not be able to see them.
     
  6. dogsoldier0513

    dogsoldier0513 Member

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    Thanks, guys. I REALLY love the gun and want to treat it to a new finish if possible. The holes in the 4563's aluminum frame are an 'eye sore', if you know what I mean....
     
  7. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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  8. brickeyee

    brickeyee Member

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    Use aluminum screws.

    If the pitch is not common you may have to cut threads on a lathe.
     
  9. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    I believe the 4563TSW has a Titanium frame as I mentioned in post #3.

    rc
     
  10. dprice3844444

    dprice3844444 member

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    se fla i love claymores 01/sot
    if it ain't broke don't fix it
     
  11. Mac's

    Mac's Member

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    We use JB Weld to fill to fill gouges, etc and then finish over it with our TG-1 finish. (Our TG-1 finish uses Gunkote 2400 Series resin) Once finished, it's invisible. Yes, the JB Weld holds up to application and curing heat with no issues. (150 to 350 degrees) I've used both, the slow curing and the fast curing kind.
    Now having said that, I have to add: It will not work well for filling holes unless there's enough support. I've filled holes by threading them, inserting a set screw and then concealing it all under the JB Weld. I've used that technique for filling holes in the sides of sheet metal AK type receivers with 100% success. Yes, it's noticeable from the inside. It's like doing "body work" on a car fender. Keep yer powder dry, Mac.
    Tuff-Gun Finishes. The Name Says It All.
    Mac's Shootin' Irons
    http://www.shootiniron.com
     
  12. brickeyee

    brickeyee Member

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    "We use JB Weld to fill to fill gouges, etc and then finish over it with our TG-1 finish. "

    You might swing by an auto body shop supplier.

    There are lots of better things to fill surface defects than JB Weld.

    Since scandium alloy screws will be very hard to find, aluminum should be fine.
    The actual scandium content is very small anyway.
     
  13. Mac's

    Mac's Member

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    "We use JB Weld to fill to fill gouges, etc and then finish over it with our TG-1 finish. "

    brickeyee...""You might swing by an auto body shop supplier. There are lots of better things to fill surface defects than JB Weld....."

    Yup, there are things that will "body-work" easier than JB Weld. It's pretty hard stuff once it's cured. However, there are a few special considerations when working with firearms and finishes. First of course, is that our Tuff-Gun finish is applied hot and then cured even hotter. (150 to 325 F) Automotive type body fillers (Bondo, etc) would never survive that process. JB Weld is fine at temperatures from minus 60F to over 500F. Also, I don't want the "body work" to fall out the first time it's fired. JB Weld has a tensile strength of almost 4000 psi. No, I don't own stock in that company. Keep yer powder dry, Mac.
    Tuff-Gun Finishes. The Name Says It All.
    Mac's Shootin' Irons
    http://www.shootiniron.com
     
  14. brickeyee

    brickeyee Member

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    "Automotive type body fillers (Bondo, etc) would never survive that process."

    There are numerous other auto body fillers for small repairs that are far better than Bondo, and many are very temperature stable.

    Most are single component and available in tubes.
    i am surprised you do not get enough thermal expansion of JB (or just about any epoxy) to create a bad finish.

    It moves a lot with temperature.

    We had to stop using it on hotter paces in aircraft to create cable fastening attachments.

    It would come of after only a few thermal cycles.
     
  15. Clark

    Clark Member

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    JB Weld is just another 2 part epoxy.

    The Army bought lots of guns; M55s, M110s, and M107s, that have lots of epoxy in them.

    Boeing makes super accurate and stable test fixtures with lots of epoxy in them.

    It is like concrete, just use it in compression.
     
  16. aminyard

    aminyard Member

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    Devcon makes a whole series of epoxy/metal fillers. They are far superior to JB in every sense. Look them up on the web (Brownells carries them).
     
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