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Kimber 1911 First Shots :)

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by CarJunkieLS1, Jul 13, 2019.

  1. CarJunkieLS1

    CarJunkieLS1 Member

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    Today I got some range time and I took the opportunity to shoot my recently acquired brand new Kimber Stainless ii 5" barrel. It's completely stock just like it came out of the box. I did a field strip and cleaning prior to shooting.

    I shot at 10 yards at a standard 6" round bullseye target. I am definitely no expert pistol shooter, I shot 50 rounds of 230 FMJ made by Blazer Brass. 100% reliable function no jams or misfeeds of any kind. I couldn't be happier.

    I did however notice my shots were consistently 2 inches high and 2-3 inches right. I'm a left handed shooter, I had both eyes open. If I aimed low and left I'd hit the bullseye. It was consistent high right the pistol groups well and is accurate, but y'all think it's my technique or are the sights off? I need advice because I'm a rifle shooter mostly so this pistol is kinda new territory for me.
     
  2. Casefull

    Casefull Member

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    Have one or two other shooters shoot your pistol to see how it groups for them. Then you can decide if it's your technique or the pistol.
    Then you can adjust your sights or change your sight picture to one that hits the bull's-eye.
     
  3. CarJunkieLS1

    CarJunkieLS1 Member

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    I've got a friend who is a better pistol shooter than me, so I'll let him try it. The pistol grouped well and consistent though so I don't believe it's a "bad" barrel or pistol I just think I need to work on my technique or possibly move the sights.
     
  4. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Since you are left handed it seems you are "pushing" the trigger, possibly in expectation of the recoil. Maybe your finger it too far into the trigger so that it is wrapping around the trigger making it pull the gun to the right.

    I'm probably not putting this into words well, sorry. It's also very hard to guess what's wrong without seeing you shoot.

    I think it's a very good idea to have someone else shoot your gun before you make any changes.
     
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  5. CarJunkieLS1

    CarJunkieLS1 Member

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    I'm definitely gonna have someone else shoot it before doing anything. I'll try using less finger on the trigger also next time I shoot it. At least the pistol has been 100% reliable for the first 50 rounds.
     
  6. Balrog

    Balrog Member

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    Good to hear Kimber’s don’t jam as bad as they used to!
     
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  7. CarJunkieLS1

    CarJunkieLS1 Member

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    I had a Kimber several years ago and I sold it, wish I hadn't. It was great and 100% reliable back then. This new one I got has been 100% for the first 50 rounds so we will see as I shoot a few hundred more through it.
     
  8. Old Dog

    Old Dog Member

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    That was pretty quick … only the sixth post until someone got in a (underhanded) bash at Kimbers.
     
  9. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    As ArchangelCD said, you are probably pushing the trigger, or flinching. I tend to push on the pistol, which being a right hander, means the group goes left.

    Just shoot it enough to satisfy your self that the windage off set is real. If you are a rifle shooter you know that everyone's rifle shoots to a different point of impact, with the same sight setting. These firearms are dynamically moving, and how rigid you are, how rigid the grip, and how consistent your flinch (no joke!), affects point of impact.

    When I take a new pistol to the range, I mark the rear sight so I can have a reference point when I move the thing. Here I probably remarked it after zeroing. Just use women's finger nail polish, white works great, make a line once it is hard. Then loosen the sight screw, use a brass drift and something light, like a small block of wood, and tap the sight in the direction you want to move the group. Then lock it down, remove old nail polish, and remark with your established zero. If you ever have to take apart that Swartz safety, you can re establish your zero quickly.

    KdNllQ0.jpg

    In so far as shooting high, change your sight picture, or you are going to have to change either the front or rear sight. If shots are going high, you will need a taller front sight, or a shorter rear sight.
     
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