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Lantern question while hunting/camping

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by bhhacker, Jan 28, 2014.

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  1. bhhacker

    bhhacker Member

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    Hello all, was just wondering if anyone here uses lanterns. I have been looking into purchasing one for camping and just in general and have come across several people that say that old school lanterns are much better. Anyone have any advice/opinions on that?


    I remember reading about a high road member that was really into collecting lanterns and was hoping to pick their brain a little about them.
     
  2. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    I have a good sized collection of Coleman liquid fuel lanterns...and use them. The biggest downside to them is the cost of fuel. It's about 10 bucks a gallon, compared to being 3 bucks a gallon not that long ago.
     
  3. 41 Mag

    41 Mag Member

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    I have the Coleman white gas type one duel fuel and the propane type. It depends on just what I am doing as to which one I haul with me. The last couple I purchased, one was a double mantle which would run on unleaded gasoline and the other a single mantle one for a propane bottle. I haven't even taken the duel fuel one out of the box. they were both purchased expressly for hurricane season where I might be out of power for who knows how long.

    We used the single mantle propane during Ike and I have to say it lasted what time we used it, the whole 4-5 or so days we didn't have power one only a partial bottle of fuel. It put out more than enough light to do anything we needed done in the house and didn't put off much fumes. We did have about every window in the house open after the storm so there was plenty of cross ventilation. The little thing is only about 2 1/2" across with a neat little globe. We hardly ever opened it up much more than about 1/4 turn as it was simply not needed. I got turned on to those by a fishing buddy who had them down on the beach when we would do overnight trips there. THey give out plenty of light when turned up to see all you need to see. They aren't quite as good for lighting up wide areas, but for an area of about 20 or so feet they are great. Remember when it is dark a little bit goes a long ways.

    I have the other white gas type we use up in the country. These I use on my shooting range during the summer nights to illuminate the targets and the inside of my shed. We also use them if we have to look for a deer at night that ran off after being shot. For what ever reason the blood stands out a little better than when using a standard flashlight. Another thing we found was that hogs are evidently not afraid of that light either. We had a boar walk right to us out across a wide open pasture with us talking to one another one night. It was pretty weird to have this big black blob appear into the edge of the light and then proceed to walk right to us. While he didn't seem to mind the light, he did seem to mind it when we opened up with our revolvers. We lost the trail of the deer, but we ended up cleaning that hog. We have also taken them down for overnight trips on the beach where we wanted to light up a bigger area to be able to watch our rods. They are better for this use because you can use foil or similar for a reflector on one side to give your eyes a break and only light up what or where your wanting to see. These are the double mantle type and they give out plenty of light.

    It really depends on how much you want ot haul with you when you go. If your running light go with the single or double propane. They last a while on one cylinder and you don't have to worry about leaking fuel in your other stuff. Even if the bottle leaks it dissipates verses the liquid fuel saturating other things around it.

    When you get ready to purchase consider how much area do you ACTUALLY NEED to illuminate. If your looking at the whole area around your tent and fire, look for the doubles if your only looking for enough to cook and then possibly put enough light out to get around camp up close then the singles work great. Remember you can raise them up to get more spread as well.

    If you do a search on them you might see the Texsport single, that is the ones we have, and the dual fuel which will run on either the Colman white gas or standard unleaded. There are also double mantle propanes which are probably just as good as the liquid fuel but you have to also consider how much your wanting to carry. One gallon of liquid will go a lot further than two bottles of gas depending on which one and how long your running them. The downside to the liquid ones it you have to keep pumping them up as they use fuel where the others you simply crack the valve open and let it run till you ready to shut it down for the night.

    Hope this sheds some light for you,:D
     
  4. Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave Member

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    When I use a lantern, it's a candle lantern. An UCO Brand from REI, and they make a 3-candle Candle-lier if you need to triple the output, or for compact use of space one could use a Folding Candle Lantern from Garret Wade.

    The problem with liquid fuel lanterns is fuel leakage and or spillage, not to mention the weight of the fuel, and if you are worried about scents in the woods when hunting deer, a few drops of kerosene or white gas on your hunting clothes or shoes will probably impact your hunt more than a beeswax or parafin candle. If you're not looking for the light output of a pressurized Coleman lantern..., I'd suggest you consider a candle lantern.

    LD
     
  5. gonefishin1

    gonefishin1 Member

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    I have a couple of them but my favorite is the Coleman Northstar propane lantern. Its super bright. I like it for flounder gigging.
     
  6. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    Last I saw was about $15/gal.

    I've used the gas lanterns since HS, 1970's. I still have 2 as well as 2 gas stoves.

    But for a couple of reasons I've converted over to propane lanterns and campstoves. Propane is so much cheaper now, I can get a 20 lb tank refilled for around $10. I can use a splitter and run my stove and a propane heater off a 20 lb tank. You can also buy an adapter and refill the small 1 lb cannisters from the larger tanks.

    But I'm not selling the gas stuff either. Who knows what may happen in the future to propane prices.

    I'd recommend staying with Coleman either way. They work, some cheaper brands don't.
     
  7. jrdolall

    jrdolall Member

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    I have both but only use the propane lanterns now. They are plenty bright and much easier without the mess of refilling. Probably costs a lot more in the long run but worth it to me.
     
  8. d2wing

    d2wing Member

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    I use a rechargeable battery one and sometimes light sticks for camping. I have a gas lantern from younger days, still works, it is about 50 years old. I don't use it anymore. Had a propane lamp but haven't used it in a long time. For camping long term and up at might a lot a propane is handy. If you will have electricity after 2-3 days a battery lamp will work.
     
  9. hartcreek

    hartcreek member

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    I have white gas Colemans, propane Colemans, Dietz Kerosene, antique oil lamps, and multiple style candle lanterns.

    What I use for a specific trip depends on that specific trip. On one back packing trip I packed in ten miles a single mantle Coleman white gas, a small Dietz kerosene and a candle lantern.
     
  10. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    I had two grill tanks filled with propane Saturday....$4.50 a gallon...They claiming there's a shortage. Of course the price will go down.

    If you ever sit down and figure the price per gallon of propane when buying those little green bottles, you might pass out from shock....To avoid that rip off, I have an adapter to refill the little bottles from a grill tank. Works great and is less than 20 bucks.
     
  11. wgp

    wgp Member

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    When I was younger and backpacked, I had a very small Coleman backpacking lantern that I carried occasionally. Now my camping is out of a pop-up camper where we use one big Coleman in a tree outside and one inside the camper, one white gas and one propane. The propane one is a bit handier and plenty bright but I seem to end up with a bunch of almost-empty propane bottles lying around. With the gas one it's easier to know how much fuel is left in it.
     
  12. JohnBT

    JohnBT Member

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  13. fguffey

    fguffey Member

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    I have collected Colman lanterns and stoves, all have date of manufacturing stamped on them, the lanterns are stamped on the bottom. The most unusual lantern by Colman I have is the military issued lantern from WW11, then there were the medical sterilization kits, I have one of those.

    And now I must get my stuff together and sell.

    I had the plastic carrying cases for the small one burner stoves and the lanterns, one day my daughter decided she was going camping with a few of her friends. Then? One day I missed the cases with camping equipment, I asked my wife "What happened?".

    My wife explained to me about things that are unexplained and make noises in the woods, anyhow, getting away from the camp site and loosing all that equipment was a small price for me to pay???

    The most convenient stove is one that screws onto the top of the bottle of gas.

    F. Guffey
     
  14. splattergun

    splattergun Member

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    Been using propane lanterns and stoves for 25 years. I've never had the appreciation for pumping and maintaining the gas appliances that some folks seem to have. A few years ago I bought a propane bottle refilling adapter at Harbor Freight on sale for about $15. I've bought very few new bottles since. I just refill a few from one of my 20# tanks and I'm good for a 10 day camp. Fuel cost using 2 lanterns and a stove is pennies. No worry about spilling smelly white gas, either.
     
  15. Vette

    Vette Member

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    pleas be very careful using any lantern in a closed space. My dad was fishing and wraped up loosley with lantern to stay warm. Came very very close to dying of carbon monoxid posoning. Never did compleatly recover
     
  16. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    I've stayed with the Coleman brand, both with dual-element Coleman fuel type and the propane-type. Indoors, IMO the propane type is safer. No real problem with the liquid fuel except there's more "Pay attention, stupid!" involved. :)
     
  17. witchhunter

    witchhunter Member

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    Guff, I found some old, I mean old Coleman mantles in a cardboard box. I think it was six packs of mantles in wax bags. On the back of the box it has an ad for a white gas iron for $2.50. I made a copy and sent it to Coleman, they dated these mantles to the 1920's. Off topic, sorry, just kind of a neat fact.
    OP, Coleman propane is the way to go in my opinion.
     
  18. bhhacker

    bhhacker Member

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    So much information! Thank you all. I have a few tiny, inexpensive LED lanterns but they dont last too long, i think i will go garage saling and see what older lanterns i can find.
     
  19. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    I had a propane Coleman years ago I bought for early spring Walleye fishing.

    It didn't like the cold weather so much, as the LP gas wouldn't when it got too cold.

    Are the new ones more cold tolerant?

    rc
     
  20. witchhunter

    witchhunter Member

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    RC the new ones are good to go, even real cold. Bad news is with this cold spell on the east coast, propane is 5 bucks here now and will go higher.
     
  21. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    We'll thats good to know.
    I will never have the need for a cold weather gas lantern again though.

    I have two kerosene lanterns in the garage, and a couple of Aladdin's in the gun room.
    Haven't used any of them in years though.

    Now days I just go for a Ryobi LED lantern that uses 1 of the 4 Battery 18v Lithium-ion drill battery's when the power goes out.

    I think it would run for days on one battery?

    rc
     
  22. JohnBT

    JohnBT Member

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    Here's what a reviewer said about the Ryobi lantern:

    "Ryobi claims a 22 hour runtime, but they don't specify what setting or which battery. If I ever get the time, I'll try setting the lantern on low with the larger battery and see how long it runs."
     
  23. jrdolall

    jrdolall Member

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    Ditto on the Ryobi. I only use the flashlights, older model, but it will run for over 18 hours on a fully charged battery. In a power outage I have turned them on and left them around the house to light up rooms and they do this admirably. If the power ever stays out for 3-4 days this could become an issue.
     
  24. Kayaker 1960

    Kayaker 1960 Member

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    I have a teardrop trailer with 12 volt lights so interior and kitchen area lighting are taken care of. I have an old Coleman propane lantern but I never use it anymore. I have found that I really don't need that much light and there are pretty bulky, especially when you add an extra propane canister. I have a small battery powered lantern that folds up to about 3" diameter and 6" long that I like.
     
  25. bhhacker

    bhhacker Member

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