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Lanyard to steady pistol

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by vincyr, May 8, 2016.

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  1. vincyr

    vincyr Member

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    I have stumbled across a couple of vague references to using a lanyard to steady a pistol, but I am having some trouble wrapping my head around the concept. Can anyone explain(or perhaps share pics) how this would work.

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  2. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    Not sure that it's the same thing you're talking about, but some owners of the AR and AK rifle based "pistols" will use a single-point sling which they run around their shoulders and then adjust so that when they push out the firearm to the appropriate extension for sighting and shooting, the sling is brought up tight. They can push out hard with their hands and the sling pulls back just as hard and they find they feel more stable than just holding it up by main strength.

    A lanyard might be a little different, but could work the same way.
     
  3. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Yup! In years now well passed this technique was often used with revolvers that were equipped with lanyard rings. ;)
     
  4. M-Cameron

    M-Cameron member

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    if you are making a shot where you need a lanyard to steady your pistol.......you should be using a rifle
     
  5. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Not necessarily. It depends on the circumstances. It may or may not be practical to be carrying a long gun (rifle or shotgun) and anything that will help steady a handgun that is easily portable is an asset.

    Rifles only become necessary when distance or the nature of the target demand greater cartridge performance or finite accuracy.

    Some folks get a great shock when they discover that a competent handgunner can hit a target about the size of a medium sized dog at a distance over the length of two football fields set end to end (200 meters). :eek:
     
  6. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    I always wonder what effect folks are expecting they'll produce when they make a statement like this.

    It doesn't answer the technical question asked.
    It doesn't speak to the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the technique described.
    It demands its own terms apply to all situations, any where, any time, ad infinitum, which is unreasonable and truly quite impossible.
    And it casts a tone of aspersion against anyone to whom those terms do not, might not, or cannot apply at any time or in any situation falling between the invention of the rifle and whenever this universe collapses back to a singularity. (Though, to be honest, as the possibility does exist for a multiverse, and/or an infinite loop of expanding and collapsing universes, the negative vibe may extend even further. Even MUCH further than that!)

    Is there some instructive upside?
     
  7. M-Cameron

    M-Cameron member

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    at least my statement is more useful than you complaining.
     
  8. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    Ok. Ok then. I don't know how it is, but I believe you if you feel that it was.
     
  9. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Ah... Why exactly is this so... :confused:

    If we presume for argument only that the handgun in question is sufficiently powerful and accurate enough to do the job? If a lanyard will add support to the platform what's the objection, especially if a rifle isn't practical given the circumstances or situation? ;)
     
  10. M-Cameron

    M-Cameron member

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    1) there are pretty much no practical civilian applications where you are going to make a 50-100 yd shot....certainly none in a SD role.....because if you have time to setup and steady your shot.....chances are you dont really need to shoot.

    2) if Military/ LEO need to make shots out to 100+ yds, they are going to use their patrol rifles.
     
  11. rskent

    rskent Member

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    I understand the sling on a rifle based pistol.

    But how would you use a lanyard on a service pistol?

    I'm just not sure how you would approach doing this.
     
  12. M-Cameron

    M-Cameron member

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    essentially the same principal behind usiing a "Shoestring tripod" to steady your camera

    145582-string_tripod_demo-b.jpg

    except instead of standing on the lanyard, you have it attached to your belt
     
  13. X-Rap

    X-Rap Member

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    Wrong style of landyard
     
  14. jeepnik

    jeepnik Member

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    Assuming you have a rifle.
     
  15. BobWright

    BobWright Member

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    Years ago someone advanced the idea of using a lanyard in the following manner:

    With the lanyard attached to a butt swivel on the revolver, the shooting hand held the revolver in a one-handed target type position, while the off hand pulled the lanyard taught across the chest. Imagine drawing a bow in archery. The resulting tension added to steadiness.

    Bob Wright
     
  16. MikeJackmin

    MikeJackmin Member

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    I saw an older gentleman win a local turkey shoot with a contender pistol and a lanyard. He had it looped over his shoulder in the usual way, and the length adjusted to let him hold it in a fairly close grip, both elbows bent. It seemed to work very well.

    It's no different than shooting off a rest, its the sort of advantage that you would use if you have it available.
     
  17. vincyr

    vincyr Member

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    Wow... Everyone always jumps to the conclusion that any discussion of handgun technique must stem from a SD/LE/Tactical viewpoint. Personally, I don't care about its practicality in those situations, my interest in the technique comes from my enjoyment of hunting squirrels with a .22lr handgun. It struck me that having a way of making steadier offhand shots might be of value, since it isn't always convenient to steady your shot against a tree. And I don't get how anyone can so easily dismiss any technique that could potentially aid accuracy. Regardless of whether you can foresee using it, that sort of knowledge has value.
     
  18. vincyr

    vincyr Member

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    OK, I think I get it. Thanks
     
  19. Mosbyranger

    Mosbyranger Member

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    I tried a lanyard on a revolver once. I never got to the point of shooting with it though. I found that the thing was excellent at hanging down and snagging every possible tree branch and shrub I managed to come across. I suppose it would maybe help keep your sidearm with you in a combat situation, but I found it frustrating when I was afield.
    MR
     
  20. BSA1

    BSA1 Member

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    A couple of my Eastern Bloc former Commie handguns came with lanyards along with a full flap holster. I assume the holsters are the correct ones actually used for duty.

    What puzzles me is if the lanyard is attached to the belt where is the lanyard cord carried? Folded or wrapped somehow inside the holster covered by flap?

    Or maybe something that was left in box and served no real practical purpose except to drive Americans nuts trying to figure out how to use them?
     
  21. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Such shots are improbable but have been known to happen. In one I'm thinking of shooting was necessary because an active shooter was being active. The one sure thing about social shooting incidents is that you can never be sure what the circumstances will be in advance.

    Presumably - but again I know of 3 incidents that were solved at between 80 and 100 yards (estimated) with a 1911A1 .45 pistol.

    In this current discussion I wasn't thinking in particular about self-defense or military combat situations. However no matter what the shooting is about, having what some might call "advanced skills" isn't a handicap. Lacking them might be.
     
  22. thewillweeks

    thewillweeks Member

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    So...I thought about this...and realized my Glock has a hole about the right place to attach one.

    See attached pictures. It seems to greatly increase one handed stability, and marginally increase two handed stability. I'll have to try it when shooting and see what kind of actual difference it makes shooting as opposed to just trying to hold it steady as I can.

    Don't mind the bailing twine, it was the first thing I came across.

    For those who've seen the real deal, is that about how it's supposed to work? As far as position on the firearm, dynamics with the arm etc?
     

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  23. BobWright

    BobWright Member

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    When I was in the US Army, MP's wore their .45's in a holster with a white braided lanyard attached to the ring on the butt of the pistol. The lanyard loop then was worn around the right shoulder under the epaulet. With white pistol belt, leggings, gloves and helmet liner, they looked pretty sharp. Uniforms were OD in winter or khaki in summer, in those days.

    Bob Wright
     
  24. Rembrandt

    Rembrandt Member

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    I've used the lanyard strap on a couple of handguns.....it works very well. Rather than strapping around the chest, found around the neck works best. Instead of a basic two hand hold you use the neck as a third point, bracing the firearm when arms are stretched out. Makes the gun more stable just as a sling does on a rifle.


    IMG_0431_zpsssh4vrlx.jpg

    002_zpspeu9on9r.jpg
     
  25. AJumbo

    AJumbo Member

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    I've seen pictures of Marine Recon troops using a coiled lanyard attached to their belts. In the firing position, the lanyard was pulled fairly taut, though I don't know how much resistance was offered. When the pistol is holstered, the the lanyard coiled itself back up and stayed out of the way. Aside from potentially being a shooting aid, I see great value in having a way to keep your pistol close to you if you should somehow lose your grip on it.
     
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