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Largest "common" animal that a pack of coyotes will attack?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by MCMXI, Jun 16, 2014.

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  1. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    I'm about to take ownership of a really nice 20 acre property that borders thousands of acres of hills, trees and mountains and was walking the property lines today with the current owner. He mentioned that coyotes come down to the property and he lost a dog last year. It was a small Dachshund but it got me thinking about my two Rottweilers and any other animals e.g. mini donkeys soon to be on the property. Am I going to have to provide armed security for my dogs during their late night bathroom excursions? Does anyone have any experience with packs if coyotes and the threat they pose to "common" pets and livestock?
     
  2. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    A pack of coyotes can kill even a large dog. They've also been known to kill young horses, goats, sheep and calves. Coyotes working in a pack will take mature deer in the wild.
     
  3. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    Crap!!! I'll be taking a suppressed AR15 with flashlight mounted out with the dogs at night then. Maybe I'll need to invest in some NV optics.
     
  4. JohnSkiS

    JohnSkiS Member

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    Whenever I let the dog out to eat, I always take my pistol out. I have heard of a friend of a friend who's Chihuahua was snatched up by coyotes in his yard as the dog sat at his feet. And I have seen a pack of coyotes take down a small cow, really small, for a cow and injured by her limp. No herd nearby, which was weird, but still, a cow. They are enough of a problem in some areas that ranchers have a bounty on them.
     
  5. MtnCreek

    MtnCreek Member

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    I doubt you'll have problems with them attacking a pair of rottweilers. A lot of people around here put a donkey in their pasture just for yotes, but I'm not sure how a miniature would hold up.

    How often do they hunt in packs? When I see them they are alone.
     
  6. CarJunkieLS1

    CarJunkieLS1 Member

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    The place that I have permission to deer hunt has a problem with coyotes...its 60 acres that has cows on part of it. The landowner has problems with coyotes injuring or killing his newborn calves. He told me that if I see a coyote to kill it on sight no questions asked. I happily ablige :)
     
  7. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    My Boykin spaniel is rather territorial and ran out in the front pasture last year and literally rammed into a female? coyote that was out there with a larger male. She knocked the female over with the impact and chased both of them 1/8 mile to the fence boundary.
    She only weighs 32 lbs.

    I think your rottweilers will be just fine. :D
     
  8. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    Coyotes generally hunt alone or in pairs but will on occasion pack up and hunt larger game.
     
  9. sage5907

    sage5907 Member

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    I think the common time for coyotes to hunt in packs is in the cold winter months. That's when they are a danger to livestock if other food sources aren't available. They will kill and eat naive dogs and domestic cats any time of year. Farmers where I live will place a donkey in a pasture to keep coyotes out. A donkey has sharp teeth and fights with all four feet. I wouldn't think they would be a danger to two large dogs, and the dogs would tell you if they are having a problem. Have you ever seen a rottweiler that was pissed off?
     
  10. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    A single coyote would not be an issue for a big aggressive dog. A pair or a pack is another story. A pack of canines even small canines attacking in a coordinated manner is just about impossible to deal with. Think African wild dogs against large game or even lions. Think wolf packs against moose or running a grizz off a kill. Think hounds baying and holding a bear or a mt lion. Two 20 lb Jadgterriers will stop and hold a large mature boar hog.

    Most coyotes even in a pack however are not going to take on a large aggressive dog like a rott. Predators look for the easy kill it's a basic survival instinct.
     
  11. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    ^^^This. Odds are, the former owner's small dog had been observed many times before it was taken, and may even have been patterned by the 'yotes.

    'Yotes will hunt in larger packs also in the spring after the pups are born, because members of the pack help to feed all of the pups within the pack. They are also in larger bachelor groups at this time due to pups being born to mated pairs. 20 acres does not give one much control over the 'yote population in the area. You do not state if you can hunt predators or even roam those thousands of acres around you. Any one with any kind of outdoor knowledge should be able to see if there is enough 'yote activity/density in the area to warrant being concerned about the welfare of two adult Rotties going to the bathroom. Making those 20 acres and the immediate area around it a bad place for 'yotes to roam is the most effective form of protection. Two adult Rotties would seem, IMHO, to be able to take care of themselves against 'yotes if they stay within their 20 acres. If they tend to roam far and wide on their nightly bathroom breaks......all bets are off.
     
  12. Sol

    Sol Member

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    You have Rottweilers, not Pomeranians.

    Rotts are big and sometimes mean, they should be able to hold their own. The only problem is they may chase them and you got to get them back. Also, coyotes are wild and kill for their food, they have an edge if there is enough of them.

    Now if there was a pack of wolves, or hyenas or as somebody else mentioned wild African cape dogs, I would be more concerned.
     
  13. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    According to the owner his Dachshund was killed by a "pack" of coyotes. This will be a learning experience for me and my dogs. I'll hope for the best but plan for the worst. Here's a recent photo of my Rotts after a hike. The male (left) is smart and gentle but his sister is a natural born killer. They're both fit at 86lb and 70lb but I worry less about her than him. They do stick together though so if they're surrounded they'll be fighting side by side.

    Thanks for all the feedback.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. frankiestoys

    frankiestoys Member

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    I live on a 100 acres and have 23 cows, on a rare occasion I have lost small calves to them during the night hours .I also have two large American Bulldogs that works as a team and keep them from getting to close ...WTS there's no guaranty that they won't sneak in when my gaurd is down if your local laws allow a good bolt action or what ever you choose can be just as effective .
     
  15. wyohome

    wyohome Member

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    If you can't hunt them, can you call a government trapper? They trap here quite a bit.
     
  16. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    Not knowing where you live (or will be) in Montana, it's not possible to say you wouldn't have problems with other predators like mtn. lions, wolves, or even bears.
    Wolves kill all coyotes they encounter and your dogs wouldn't stand much of a chance against them. Lions will run from dogs but not miniature donkeys. And bears ... well, bears will just do what they want, especially grizzlies.
     
  17. PistolPete45

    PistolPete45 Member

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    You should be fine with 2 rotties and from what I have seen on the net donkeys will kill or run off Coyotes. your place would be last on a list of places to hunt food for a Coyote.
     
  18. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    Wile E. doesn't usually travel or live in a pack. He's more solitary. Even in breeding season.
    Llamas are being used in some places to deal with coyotes and wolves who hunt sheep.
    The two eating machines in the huge picture(big pictures slow the page loading) won't have much trouble from Wile E.
     
  19. aarondhgraham

    aarondhgraham Member

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    Llamas versus Coyotes?,,,

    I live in north central Oklahoma,,,
    Every day I pass a field that has a ton of goats,,,
    There is a Great Pyrenees dog out there but also a pair of Llamas.

    Are you saying they are for coyote protection?

    I'm not arguing with you at all,,,
    it's just that I would never have guessed that.

    We do have coyotes all over this place.

    Aarond

    .
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2014
  20. jrdolall

    jrdolall Member

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    I've always seen singles or pairs. I have never seen them kill a calf but I have seen the leftovers. Did they kill a calf or eat a stillborn?
    I wouldn't worry a bit about those rotties.
     
  21. Blue Brick

    Blue Brick Member

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    ??????????
     
  22. Blue Brick

    Blue Brick Member

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  23. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    Yes...around here folks use both donkeys and Llamas to protect sheep and milking goats from coyotes. But Rotties are much more capable of defending themselves than sheep or goats, and in most cases, are less vulnerable because they stay closer to human habitation.

    I have seen as many as 5 coyotes working as one in attempt to drive wild turkeys to one another, taking turns being both standers and drivers. This when turkeys are flocked up and have been in a location long enough to be patterned by the dogs.
     
  24. nmlongbow

    nmlongbow Member

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    The Rotties wil be fine. I owned Rotts for 20 years and never had a problem with yotes.

    I have a couple of Pyr's now and they have a natural hate for coyotes more than any other animal. Also had a couple of llamas for several years and they would work together to drive off coyotes and even black bears. I have no doubt that my llamas could put the hurt on my Pyrs anytime they wanted. I gave my llamas to a neighbor to protect his Alpacas and he hasn't had a problem since. Llamas are also easy to take care of and don't require much feed, especially if there is natural browse.
     
  25. Davek1977

    Davek1977 Member

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    I live in SD, and we have PLENTY of yotes around. Having said that, we've had dogs on our ranch basically the entirety of my 36 years, mainly labs or beagles. These dogs are "ranch" dogs, meaning they are free to roam the property during the day, aren't put indoors at night, etc. We've had exactly zero dogs killed or even attacked by coyotes during that time. Its not due to no coyotes around, as we've actually had them in our yard at various times. I'm not saying a coyote attack isn't possible, but theres no damn way we'd ever concern ourselves with providing a Rottie an armed escort to do his business at night. Others experiences may vary, but by and large, the dogs we've had have managed to hold their own against any other wild canines in the vicinity to the point of it being a complete nonissue in our minds. For that matter, we've raised a few hundred yearlings and 350 +/- pairs of cows and calves, and have never lost a calf to coyote depredation as far back as I can remember.
     
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