Last Damascus barreled shotgun produced in America

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by orpington, May 8, 2021.

  1. orpington

    orpington Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2014
    Messages:
    813
    I know Parker produced at least one in 1928. Were there any American manufacturers who produced any later, or, I suppose, are there any known Parkers with Damascus barrels produced after 1928?

    We can probably limit this to the big 4 side by side manufacturers producing shotguns in 1928 or later. Parker has already been discussed. A H Fox never produced Damascus barreled shotguns. Which means the question really is, are there any Damascus barreled Parkers known to have been produced after 1928 and when was the last Ithaca and L C Smith with Damascus barrels manufactured?
     
  2. whughett

    whughett Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2008
    Messages:
    4,112
    Location:
    Rhode Island/Florida
    I have a 1894 Remington with two barrels. One is Damascus. By its serial number it was manufactured in 1905. The Damascus barrel was added later than that, a factory custom fit but no date to indicate just when.
     
  3. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Messages:
    14,634
    Location:
    Georgia
    There was also the Crescent Firearms company who made a butt load of shotguns from 1992-1932. They made guns and stamped various names on them sold in hardware stores etc. Many were bought via mail order.

    I have one that belonged to my great grandfather. I'm not sure when he bought it, but he was born in the late 1850's and died in the late 1950's just short of 100 years old. I think his gun was made 1898, but he may have bought it used later.

    My great grandfather's gun is stamped "Bridge Gun Company". That brand was sold by the Sharpleigh Hardware Company in St. Louis MO.

    A few years ago I spent several hours googling various stuff and researching great grand dads gun. This is one of the sources I located.

    Shotgunworld.com • Folsom, Crescent, American Gun Co. & Tradename Information

    101_0690.JPG 101_0689.JPG
     
    kcofohio likes this.
  4. orpington

    orpington Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2014
    Messages:
    813
    To maybe figure out the last Damascus barrel on an Ithaca I believe the New Ithaca Double came out in 1926. Are any of this model known to exist with Damascus barrels?
     
  5. orpington

    orpington Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2014
    Messages:
    813
    Further research reveals that the option of Damascus barrels on an Ithaca or L C Smith shotgun ended in 1918 or, at least, the literature for both these makers does not reflect a Damascus option in 1919. So, I think the answer to my own question is Parker, 1928. Please support, modify, or refute my hypothesis.
     
  6. orpington

    orpington Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2014
    Messages:
    813
    Just curious, but I discovered answers on my own. Few other responses strongly suggests there is little or no interest on Damascus barreled shotguns. Is my hypothesis true?
     
  7. George P

    George P Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2018
    Messages:
    7,557
    Old Damascus barrels are generally VERY IFFY as to safety, especially if they were shot using BP loads. IIRC, one fo the English makers and a few Italian ones are making modern Damascus barrels that are safe with modern proof loads.
     
  8. C.R.

    C.R. Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    307
    Location:
    south centeral Wisconsin
    George has it ! Damascus barrels are generally going to be a wall hanger because of the chance of damage if using modern loads, they were made for black powder loads
     
  9. orpington

    orpington Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2014
    Messages:
    813
    Okay. So, most Damascus barreled shotguns have little value? Best to pursue other vintage firearms, I suppose.
     
  10. George P

    George P Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2018
    Messages:
    7,557
    It isn't that older guns like those can't be fired with modern low-pressure designed for old guns. the issue is most folks do not know how to properly evaluate the integrity of them and thus there is a risk of things going bad.....
     
    DM~ likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice